Six typical integration challenges that agile integration can solve

Red Hat conceived the agile integration concept to help our customers tackle integration challenges more effectively. As we described in an earlier post in detail, agile integration is an architectural approach centered around application programming interfaces (APIs) and API management. At its core, this concept resides on the following three pillars: distributed integration for greater flexibility, containers for the ability to scale better, and managed APIs for re-usability and hence speed.

When we started designing this concept we actually started from two premises:

  1. Agility today is the most important business capability — especially for incumbents in traditional markets.
  2. Every organisation has integration problems.

Typically in most companies nowadays the integration function is centralized and hence technically as well as organizationally a bottleneck. Our two premises contradict each other and we set out to design an integration concept that can solve this contradiction.

In order to come up with a solution that really helps our customers solve their integration problems in the best possible way, we first analysed the market to understand what actually are the problems that users are trying to solve. Although there are of course a very wide variety of often very fine-nuanced problems, it turned out that we could classify all the problems into six typical integration challenges. The following diagram summarizes these challenges and we then discuss each of them in more detail.

Agile Integration: Six Challenges

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Red Hat present at EclipseCon France 2018

EclipseCon France is taking place this week in Toulouse, France (June 13-14, 2018) and it’s offering a great lineup of top-notch sessions on nine different tracks, from IoT to cloud and modeling technologies. This year, there is even a dedicated track for “Microservices, MicroProfile, EE4J and Jakarta EE,” which is covering topics such as Istio, 12-factor apps, geoscience, machine learning, noSQL database integration, cloud-native application development, security, resilience, scalability, and the latest statuses of the Jakarta EE and MicroProfile open source specification projects. Under this track, we are hosting two sessions:

But we are also delivering other interesting sessions under the “Reactive Programming” track:

Under the “IoT” track:

Under the “Eclipse IDE and RCP in Practice” track:

And, under the “Cloud & DevOps” and “Other Cool Stuff” tracks:

For those of you that will be at the conference, we invite you to attend the sessions above and to stop by the Red Hat booth to learn how Red Hat can help your organization solve your IT challenges (and get your swag too!). And for those of you that would like to learn more about Red Hat offerings in relation to the topics above, please visit the following links:

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes: Delivering new productivity, performance, and stronger standards support with its latest sprint release

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes is a collection of cloud-native application runtimes that are optimized to run on OpenShift, including Eclipse Vert.x, Node.js, Spring Boot, and WildFly Swarm. In addition, OpenShift Application Runtimes includes the Launch Service, which helps developers get up and running quickly in the cloud through a number of ready-to-run examples — or missions — that streamline developer productivity.

New Cache Booster with JBoss Data Grid integration

In our latest continuous delivery release, we have added a new cache mission  that demonstrates how to use a cache to increase the response time of applications.  This mission shows you how to:

  1. Deploy a cache to OpenShift.
  2. Use a cache within an application.

The common use case for this booster is to cache service result sets to decrease latency associated with data access as well as reduce workload on backend service.  Another very common use case is to reduce the data volume of message send across in distributed system.

Continue reading “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes: Delivering new productivity, performance, and stronger standards support with its latest sprint release”

The Role of Agile Integration in Open Banking

In the mid 90s, Bill Gates famously said that “banking is necessary, banks are not.” There is certainly a lot of truth in this statement. We all need banking services in some shape or form. But who delivers these services to us is secondary. In fact, Accenture concluded in a study conducted in 2016 asking over 30,000 people in 18 countries that if the tech titans like Google, Amazon, or Facebook would offer such services, 31% of the respondents would switch to them. This clearly imposes a significant threat on traditional banking institutions.

Another challenge that banks are facing worldwide are the increasing demands for regulatory compliance with respect to openness. Such regulations include, for instance, Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2) in Europe, the Amendment Bill to Japanese Banking Law in Japan, the National Payments Corporation of India (NPCI) with the Unified Payment Interface, UK’s Open Banking standard by the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), or the Open Banking Regime by Australia’s Federal Government. Banks approach these regulatory challenges in many different ways. Some see it as a serious business threat and only do the bare minimum for compliance; others see it as an opportunity and with smart investment start building banking platforms for the future.

Our suggestion for building the banking platform of the future resides on the principles of agile integration, which is an architectural approach centered around application programming interfaces (APIs) and API management. At its core, agile integration resides on the three pillars: distributed integration for greater flexibility, containers for the ability to scale better, and managed APIs for re-usability and hence speed. We described the details in an earlier post.  

Continue reading “The Role of Agile Integration in Open Banking”

How to Address the Challenges of a Pervasive Integration Strategy

Earlier this months at the Gartner ITxpo event, Massimo Pezzini presented the challenges that must be addressed by a pervasive enterprise integration strategy. In summary there are four types of hybrid challenges (see Massimo’s diagram below).

Gartner-HiP

Continue reading “How to Address the Challenges of a Pervasive Integration Strategy”

Go Anywhere API Management: 3scale API Management adds a Fully Containerized On-Premises Version

Today is a special day for the 3scale team at Red Hat. It’s been just 10 short months since the company joined Red Hat in the summer of last year and there has been a buzz of activity for the entire time.

One of the biggest new goals was to add a fully on premise version of the 3scale API Management product to the line up alongside the existing Software as a Service (SaaS) version. Hence the team is very happy to announce the availability of that new version which is now generally available. Get started looking at 3scale’s customer portal page.

Launching the on-premise version is special for two reasons. First, because increasing numbers of customers are now running large numbers of public and private APIs – often deep in their internal infrastructure. Deploying API Management in their own data center or in a cloud environment they own is often a key part of succeeding. Second, it is special because of the way on-premise is being delivered. Specifically the new product is shipping entirely on Red Hat’s powerful container management platform, OpenShift.

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Enhanced containerized integration services on OpenShift: Red Hat Fuse Integration Services

Updated and enhanced integration services are now available on Red Hat OpenShift. A containerized, formatted version of Red Hat Fuse 6.3 is now available for simplified deployments on OpenShift instances.

Technology is shifting so rapidly — from cloud-based architectures, Internet of Things and a variety of devices for interaction, new data streams, and mobile apps, to name a few — that organizations have to be able to create and deploy applications and process data quickly. Traditional, monolithic systems and top-heavy ESB-style integration approaches tend to be too slow and rigid to enable this level rapid innovation.

That is where an agile integration framework like Red Hat Fuse can be a foundational element in your IT and digital strategy. Agile integration has three core capabilities: distributed integration, containers, and an API-based architecture.

  1. Red Hat Fuse uses the lightweight distributed integration patterns of the underlying Apache Camel project.
  2. As part of the JBoss middleware services on OpenShift, Red Hat Fuse is available for rapid deployment within container and cloud environments. Red Hat OpenShift is based on Docker and Kubernetes. Container architectures allow developers to build and integrate traditional and microservices-based applications at scale quickly.
  3. Red Hat Fuse can be used together with Red Hat 3scale API Management Platform as an engine to develop and deploy APIs, both internally to development groups and externally for customer and partner ecosystems.

Integration technologies help organizations build on their existing infrastructures even as they pivot to new cloud-based and service-based architectures.

Features (and Benefits) at a Glance

  • Spring Boot support
  • Custom-developed, containerized applications based on Apache Camel 2.18
  • Integration with Hystrix and Zipkin microservices frameworks
  • An optimized integration environment for microservices applications on Red Hat OpenShift
  • Path to transition off existing Apache Karaf-based applications to cloud architectures
  • Consistent hybrid integration platform across their enterprise

More Information

Five Links: A Little Bit of This Edition

Happy Friday, everyone!

I’ve still been running through year-end retrospectives and new year predictions, and I haven’t hit on a theme yet. (The character of 2017 is still enigmatic.) As always, though, there are lots of good things on the interwebz, and this week covers the gamut — containers, big data, machine learning, and Alexa.

happy-friday-quotes

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Bringing Containerized Services and DevOps Closer to (Your) Reality

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For more than 10 years, Red Hat JBoss Middleware has been a successful business that deeply represented the Red Hat DNA: open source software. We expanded our product portfolio with projects created and imagined by the open source community; we decided to support other projects with contributors; and we also opened the source of technologies we acquired. Somewhere along the way, Linux containers, Kubernetes, and docker happened which made us realize that containerization of applications is the base for your next 20 years. The caveat in this is that a platform is only as important as the applications you run on top of it. In other words, a platform not running applications is not realizing its value. With that in mind, we made an important decision and investment to evolve our application portfolio in similar ways that we ask our customers to do to theirs: let’s take our Red Hat JBoss Middleware products, commonly deployed on Linux and Windows machines, and make them available as containerized deployments.

With the announcement of the availability of JBoss Data Virtualization for OpenShift we now have 100 percent of our Red Hat JBoss Middleware runtime portfolio containerized and available in Red Hat OpenShift, an enterprise-ready Kubernetes distribution with value-added capabilities that go from deploying your already packaged container images, to delivering a DevOps pipeline for an iterative development process.

Continue reading “Bringing Containerized Services and DevOps Closer to (Your) Reality”

Containerizing an application for the cloud: A journey of settings, state, and security.

Red Hat Developers and author N. Harrison Ripps have just begun releasing a ten-part series in which Harrison describes the process of deploying an application using containers into a clustered environment on the cloud.

Using the ZRC IRC client as a sample application, Harrison demonstrates each step in the process of containerizing software, dealing with issues like statelessness, security, and robustness that are typically architectural hurdles for most development teams moving to a cloud infrastructure.

Parameterizing application settings is a common requirement of applications that end up deploying to any environment, and containers have only heightened this need — with the emergence of on-demand environments, scriptability and configurability of the application images being deployed is a must.

Harrison suggests that containerizing applications should happen later, while development should happen first. This might seem intuitive, but his point is that containerizing an application actually need not introduce many development-time changes that would affect the architecture of your system — it can, but it need not. For a small sacrifice of startup performance, container images can be made more configurable and flexible, supporting DevOps procedures and deployments.

Once configured, the series also demonstrates how to host the application on a private instance of the OpenShift Container Platform, including clustering, via either the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), or binary download of OpenShift. Harrison goes step-by-step through the process of starting the private cloud, deploying the application, and using Kubernetes to cluster the application.

Using attached storage, Harrison introduces a window of statefulness into our container environment. This produces an application that runs on the cloud in stateless containers, but maintains its internal state throughout the lifecycle as pods are brought up and down.

Follow along and learn some of these core cloud concepts as the series is published:

Title Date
That app you love, part 1: Making a connection 2016/09/27
That app you love, part 2: Immutable but flexible – What settings matter? 2016/09/29
That app you love, part 3: Every setting in its place 2016/10/04
That app you love, part 4: Designing a config-and-run container 2016/10/06
That app you love, part 5: Upping our (cloud) game 2016/10/11
That app you love, part 6: Container, meet cloud 2016/10/13
That app you love, part 7: Wired for sound 2016/10/18
That app you love, part 8: A blueprint for “that app you love” 2016/10/20
That app you love, part 9: Storage and statefulness 2016/10/25
That app you love, part 10: Long live “that app you love” 2016/10/27
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