New Documentation with JBoss EAP 7.1: Performance Tuning Guide

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 (JBoss EAP) is optimized for performance out-of-the-box. However, a frequent request that we receive from customers is for advice on how to further monitor and tune their JBoss EAP environment for even better performance.

To meet this customer demand, the JBoss EAP Customer Content Services team has produced a new Performance Tuning Guide that is now available with JBoss EAP 7.1.

We have worked with multiple teams inside Red Hat to produce this guide, including software, performance, and quality engineering, as well as Red Hat consultants, solution architects, and support engineers.

The new guide covers high-level JBoss EAP performance advice, including:

  • Monitoring JBoss EAP performance
  • Diagnosing performance issues
  • Tuning JBoss EAP subsystems and components, including:
    • JVM tuning
    • EJB subsystem
    • Datasources and resource adapters
    • Messaging subsystem
    • Undertow subsystem
    • IO subsystem
    • JGroups subsystem
    • Transactions subsystem

We’d love to know what you think of this new guide! The best way to send us your feedback on documentation is to create a new discussion on the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Summit Notes: Tuesday Morning General Session

If you missed it, the keynote speeches are available on the Summit page or on YouTube.

“You don’t need to focus on technology. You need to empower your developers.”

There are certain patterns in the middleware / application development tracks for Red Hat Summit this year, and they revolve a lot around microservices. That makes a certain kind of sense (microservices are the new hotness in app development), but it’s also reflective of a larger current in technology, a continuing push toward … something.

In his opening keynote, Red Hat EVP Paul Cormier noted that one of the themes of Summit 2016 was “dev and ops coming together through common architectures, processes, and platforms.” This echoes major trends in technology — DevOps and architectures, process, and platform as a unifying IT strategy — and yet none of these concepts are really new. Two decades ago, there were developers and operations, there was enterprise architecture, application platforms, and internal processes. So what’s new and what is bringing the urgency now?

I think the difference comes down to speed (and eventually differences in degree become differences in kind). Twenty years ago, an application was released yearly, sometimes even every couple of years. A patch or security update could take a few months to move in the pipeline from development to testing to production.

Now customers expect patches for security vulnerabilities within hours of them being detected, and the expanding number of applications (from consumer mobile apps to internal systems to IoT devices) means that enterprises have potentially dozens of touchpoints and hundreds of services to maintain.

The “modern” part of modern application development isn’t in the app — it’s in the speed.

This year’s Summit kicked off with three interlocking demos, each showing the different paths and progressions that an IT environment will face as they juggle modernizing existing applications and creating new ones within a heterogeneous (and dynamically changing) ecosystem.

 Lifting and Shifting (Windup)

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