Red Hat partners guide your journey to cloud-native development

The big question is always, “Do we car manufacturers learn to become tech companies more quickly than a tech company learns to be an automotive player?”

That is quite a statement. When a leading car manufacturer worries about being disrupted by a technology company, you know something big is going on. No wonder so many companies are talking about disruption these days.

There is a big transition taking place. And it is not just about competition. Or innovation. Or value migration. Or the creation of new markets. It is about the fact that every company is becoming a technology company, and only those that embrace this will survive, thrive, and shape our world. Software is at the core of this change, and increasingly it appears that the cloud is where much of this is going to take place.

Customers often come to us asking, “How can I be faster? How can I innovate and lead, instead of repeat and follow? How can I do that with enterprise-grade security, reliability and resiliency?”

A good part of the answer lies in using the cloud to power business models and help run, migrate, or scale existing applications, or develop new cloud-native ones. Red Hat has offered platforms to run customers’ applications and infrastructure in the cloud for a number of years. Today, we are taking another step forward by offering cloud-native application runtimes and frameworks, fully supported and enterprise grade.

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes offers a curated selection of popular cloud-native application runtimes and frameworks that are well-suited for enabling cloud-native application development.

In the words of Joe Dickman, senior vice president of Vizuri, “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes establishes a foundation for building services for hybrid and multi-cloud application and systems […] in a myriad of environments using their preferred tools.”

With Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, organizations can innovate directly in the cloud, from inception to production; running in the industry’s most comprehensive Kubernetes platform, Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, and in a cloud provider of choice.

James Chinn, CEO at Shadow-Soft, adds: “With Red Hat’s latest support of Wildfly Swarm, Spring Boot, and NodeJS, our customers can feel confident building and scaling containerized workloads on OpenShift. Openshift deployed in a public cloud gives our customers the flexibility and agility to deploy an enterprise and container framework quickly and easily.”

When customers develop an application strategy for moving to the cloud, they have to choose the right runtimes, based on factors such as existing skills or the right framework for the application they need to create.

“Historically, one of the biggest challenges has been the roadmap necessary for change in legacy environments,” says Chris Hart, chief technology officer of Levvel. “OpenShift Application Runtimes helps simplify that transformation and lowers the effort and risks to getting started with cloud-native development.”

They need to decide which applications to move to the cloud and how to keep evolving and innovating. What applications get a lift-and-shift (rehost) versus reshape or re-architect? Should they create “fast monoliths” or decompose them, totally, or partially, as microservices? If so, what is the right framework for the job?

Erik Melander, EVP of solutions at Kovarus, expands on this: “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes […] reduces friction by packaging and supporting a curated set of open application runtimes and letting developers make the right choice for cloud-native development.”

It is also important for them to learn about containers and how to implement DevOps methodologies and culture. Development and operations teams may need to learn new skills and change the way they work.

We are happy to have a large network of partners around the world with the expertise to support our customers along the exciting path of going to the cloud. From the top level strategy and innovation consulting, down to the most detailed testing and infrastructure set up. From defining and helping implement an application modernization strategy, to helping implement and deploy a microservices architecture.

Red Hat solution systems integrators and solution providers can help select the right option based on the technical objectives, existing skills or strategy. They can also help customers prepare for the challenges of complex microservices architectures and equip an organization to adopt DevOps practices and culture.

Start your journey here!

Supporting quotes:

“For our customers that are developing applications to create and sustain competitive advantage, developer productivity is an ever-present challenge. We are excited to see Red Hat addressing this problem with the launch of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, which reduces friction by packaging and supporting a curated set of open application runtimes and letting developers make the right choice for cloud-native development.”
Erik Melander, EVP of Solutions at Kovarus

“We’re excited about Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes because it simplifies the adoption of beneficial technologies for our enterprise customers. Many companies know they need to achieve higher release velocity and improved reliability using approaches like microservices architecture and more modern development and operations tools. Historically, one of the biggest challenges has been the roadmap necessary for change in legacy environments. The OpenShift Application Runtimes help simplify that transformation and lowers the effort and risks to getting started with cloud-native development. We’re looking forward to seeing this accelerate our customers’ success.”
Chris Hart, Chief Technology Officer, Levvel

“We are excited about the announcement of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes as it signals Red Hat’s continual commitment to meeting our customers where they are today and positioning them for success in the future. With Red Hat’s latest support of Wildfly Swarm, Spring Boot and NodeJS, our customers can feel confident building and scaling containerized workloads on OpenShift. Openshift deployed in a public cloud gives our customers the flexibility and agility to deploy an enterprise and container framework quickly and easily. And like any public cloud deployment, you can start small and scale elastically as workloads demand.”
James Chinn, CEO, Shadow-Soft

“Organizations that are investing time and resources in cloud-native architectures must look at leveraging containerized workloads to provide a robust, flexible and reliable infrastructure that can respond quickly to changing customer needs. Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes establishes a foundation for building services for hybrid and multi-cloud application and systems in a programmable way that provision and decommission infrastructure and applications resources in a myriad of environments using their preferred tools.”
Joe Dickman, Senior Vice President, Vizuri

 

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes + JBoss EAP for fast, lightweight, Java EE cloud applications

Have you read the announcement of the alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR)? We also posted an introduction to the component in RHOAR earlier.

Red Hat Intends to include entitlements for the JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) as part of a Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) subscription.  The reasoning for this is dead simple, there is still strong demand for a Java application platform the implements the Java EE specification. JBoss EAP 7 fits that requirements with certified full platform and web profile support for the Java EE 7 specification. Best of all, JBoss EAP offers Java EE 7 capabilities in a small, fast, cloud ready footprint. It has been available on the OpenShift Cloud Platform (OCP) since version 6. JBoss EAP is cloud ready and deserves to be included as a RHOAR component.

I want to believe. Prove that JBoss is small and fast!

First lets agree on what a Java EE application platform is. I propose a minimalist definition. That being, a Java EE application platform is verified to have implemented a specific Java EE specification. The current Java EE 7 specification is extensive and runs 290 pages long. Implementing the details is no trivial task. As of the date of this article, there are eight products that have been verified by Oracle to be Java EE 7 full platform compatible implementations. Red Hat JBoss EAP 7 is one of those products. However, Apache Tomcat, JBoss Web Server, and Pivotal tcServer are not on the list. Those products are not Java EE application platforms.

Continue reading “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes + JBoss EAP for fast, lightweight, Java EE cloud applications”

Reactive architecture for hybrid cloud environments: Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7 is now available

Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7, now available, introduces a new reactive architecture, with an enhanced broker, a new interconnect router, and expanded client support. This new architecture is more responsive and increases both throughput and performance for messaging services.

The JBoss AMQ broker, based on Apache ActiveMQ Artemis, manages connections, queues, topics, and subscriptions. Using innovations from Artemis, the broker has an asynchronous internal architecture, which can increase performance and scalability and enable it to handle more concurrent connections and achieve greater message throughput. Additionally, the high availability topology for AMQ has been redesigned for a “share nothing” architecture — this removes the need for a centralized database or storage location and uses a distributed, highly available topology instead.

The new interconnect router allows unrestricted redundancy. The router automatically reroutes messaging traffic between data centers, cloud services, and geographic locations. As with the broker’s distributed data topology, the interconnect router is the core for distributed messaging services, which allows operations to have redundant, secure, and reliable connectivity and to optimize messaging between services.

JBoss AMQ 7 expands its support of popular messaging APIs and protocols by adding new client libraries (on top of its existing MQTT and AMQP support):

  • Java Message Service (JMS) 2.0
  • JavaScript
  • C++
  • .NET
  • Python

By creating a more distributed topology and broad protocol and language support, JBoss AMQ is a more reactive messaging platform and can support dynamic microservices and other application architectures.

JBoss AMQ is a lightweight, standards-based open source messaging platform designed to enable real-time communication between different applications, services, devices, and the Internet of Things (IoT). It also serves as the messaging foundation for Red Hat JBoss Fuse, Red Hat’s lightweight, flexible integration platform, and is designed to provide the real-time, distributed messaging capabilities needed to support an agile integration approach for modern application development.

Additional resources

Five Links: Band of Brothers Edition

Happy Friday, everyone.

Red Hat has a lot of corporate blogs (worth reading!), but a huge part of our culture as a company is collaboration and meritocracy. As in … letting our opinions be known. There’s a reason we actually made a t-shirt to commemorate our corporation-wide mailing list.

happy-friday

From Pinterest

A lot of Red Hatters have personal blogs (or active LinkedIn postings) precisely because of the value that we as a group place on transparency, defending ideas, and innovation.

This week, I want to highlight some of the blogs by Red Hatters that I’ve read recently. I’m not even going to call this a “top 5,” because we have a lot of prolific and interesting writers on a million different topics. These are a random sampling of the blogs that I hit periodically.

Continue reading “Five Links: Band of Brothers Edition”

Five Links: All My Friends Are Dead Edition

Happy Friday, everyone.

The end of the year is often a season of reflection. This year, that reflection seems to have taken a nihilistic tinge, as a lot of people are declaring things dead. Change can feel like death, I guess, but I think it’s easy to conflate something evolving with that something going away. This week, I want to look at some of the technology deaths which, like Mark Twain’s, are greatly exaggerated.

dec-friday

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Five Links: Make Me Feel Safe Edition

Happy Friday, everyone.

The last few weeks have seen a series of DDOS attacks taking out major services through vulnerabilities in IoT security, outages from human error, and data breaches from major players like Yahoo and less reputable ones as well. There are a lot of different attack vectors and different types of information that is vulnerable — and this highlights the thin line between security and risk. Security is not exactly a buzzword and it doesn’t get a lot of attention until (like insurance, a warm coat, or a full tank of gas) you really need it. That’s this week’s theme — data security and privacy.

funny-memes-safe-risky

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Red Hat Summit Preview – Discovery session series

When we go to the Red Hat Summit this year in San Francisco, we have planned to attend sessions, labs, evening events and even maybe a few good seafood restaurants. Little did you know that there is a gem you might want to fit into your busy schedule, as it is a chance to meet some of the rock stars that are backing the  Red Hat Open Innovation Labs.

There will be a series of sessions hosted by experts to showcase use of Red Hat technologies and demonstrate the best practices with interactive white boarding. That is a personal touch session where you can interact with the storytellers and will be taking place in the West Lobby of M0scone Center on level 2.

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App Dev Cloud Stack – Open interoperability critical to success

This series started with the statement, what do you mean by “Can’t ignore the stack anymore?”

When your background is application development, you have spent many hours, days and years perfecting your craft. You have not only mastered languages and concepts, you have made it a point to learn to make good architectural decisions when pulling together the applications you develop.

The problem is, we tend to ignore the stack we are working on as much as we can. Well it’s time that we as application developers broadened our horizons a bit, expanding our understanding of the stack we work on with the introduction of Cloud, Platform As A Service (PaaS) and containers to our toolboxes.

Our tour of your Cloud stack continues, from our previous article in this series where we talked about our PaaS interface for our application delivery, onto how open interoperability is critical to the success of our Cloud stack.

Continue reading “App Dev Cloud Stack – Open interoperability critical to success”

Containers, cloud, and Java apps: A new video on development stacks

DevOps methodologies are core to a (modern) IT environment because they focus on strategic business demands: resilient design, rapid scale, and reliable service delivery. That last characteristic is the critical for effective DevOps environments.

The goal is for you to move through the total dev stack, as fast as your development team can code. Our new video shows how a Java app goes from being developed on an OpenShift container to launching on a production cloud instance in under five minutes.

Continue reading “Containers, cloud, and Java apps: A new video on development stacks”

Messaging: The Underappreciated Element of Integration

Many people take integration messaging for granted, and many organizations assume that any messaging platform is as fully featured as any other. But in today’s increasingly connected world, with the emergence of major trends in consumer and enterprise technology like mobile, cloud computing, big data, and the Internet of Things, your organization needs to carefully review its messaging platforms and capabilities if you hope to continue to reliably serve your customers and deliver and maintain critical advantages over your competition.

To illustrate how vital and varied messaging platforms can be, let’s explore what exactly messaging is and compare several different approaches to meeting your organization’s messaging needs.

Continue reading “Messaging: The Underappreciated Element of Integration”

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