Insights about tuning an Apache Camel application deployed into Spring Boot

Introduction

Tuning is a very interesting topic in the field of Software Engineering. Everybody can agree that it’s important but I have  rarely seen people actually doing it. This can be especially true when people have spare computational resources to spend, or if they are following these mantras: “the load won’t reach at this point” or “let the cloud scale it.”

The goal of this post is to share some insights regarding tuning an Apache Camel application deployed into Spring Boot. This is not an ultimate guide for tuning and performance tests in Spring Boot applications, but more of an experience sharing during a tuning process.

When talking about tuning and performance tests, one thing that needs to be clear is the requirements, or what do you want to achieve by tuning an application. For example, one could say that with the computational resources they have, they aim for a 10% increase of requests the application can handle.

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Building an API-Based Connected Healthcare Solution: Q&A Followup

Christina Lin (a technology evangelist for Red Hat) and Sameer Parulkar (middleware product marketing manager for Red Hat) conducted a webinar earlier this week about data integration challenges which specifically face healthcare providers. As promised, this is a brief roundup of the major questions that came out of the webinar and pointers to more detailed information about the demo. (If you would like more background on integration challenges in healthcare, we do have posts on integration architecture for healthcare and another on how to overcome integration challenges.)

A Quick Summary

The recording of the full webinar is available here, but I’ll summarize it briefly if you can’t watch it yet.

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Upcoming: Architecture Designs for Camel Developers

Bilgin Ibryam, a senior architect with Red Hat, will be conducting a webinar about design patterns for new architectures like microservices, IoT, and SOA — which Apache Camel developers can use to be more effective in their coding.

Apache Camel itself is based on defined set of design patterns for messaging and integration. This makes Apache Camel a natural framework for designing microservices and IoT applications, which are inherently distributed computing systems. However, developing applications in Camel requires layers of design decisions, because effectively isolating computing components requires a clear understanding of how they will be interacting. This webinar will call out commonly used patterns and design principles for Camel application development, based on real-world examples. This covers a variety of principles, from error handling to complex, multi-route applications, scalability, and high availability.

Registration is open. The webinar is Tuesday, June 7, at 11:00am Eastern Time (US).

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Fun Follow Up: Webinar Q&A

I will collect any questions asked during the webinar, and I’ll do a follow-up post on Friday, June 10, to try to capture the most interesting (or confounding) questions that arise.

Overcoming Healthcare Integration Challenges

Healthcare companies face many challenges as they seek to transform their organizations and remain competitive while managing patients’ health, complying with evolving regulations, and achieving interoperability with the rest of the healthcare community.

At the heart of the healthcare revolution are IT leaders charged with catalyzing rapid innovation. Technology is an important part of the solution for overcoming these challenges and evolving healthcare for the good of both the patient and the business. An open and interoperable IT infrastructure can help stimulate innovation throughout the organization, while creating greater IT efficiency, stability, scalability, and security.

In this post, we will explore the key integration challenges that healthcare companies are grappling with today and discuss both old and new solutions to these challenges.

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Java EE: Onward and Upward!

For many observers, I believe the take-away from this year’s JavaOne was: “business as usual.” In some important ways, business as usual here is a good thing.

Is Java (EE) dead?

There have been rumors and pontifications regarding a supposed demise of enterprise Java. There certainly are many areas and drivers of disruptive innovation in enterprise software development: microservices, event-driven programming, and the Internet of Things (IoT) are just a few. And yes, for a new project beginning in isolation with no constraints or requirements of backward compatibility, legacy integration, or management at scale, there are many new platforms and frameworks that may seem at first to be well-suited for any one of these new areas. But how many enterprise projects have that luxury?

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