Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes: Delivering new productivity, performance, and stronger standards support with its latest sprint release

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes is a collection of cloud-native application runtimes that are optimized to run on OpenShift, including Eclipse Vert.x, Node.js, Spring Boot, and WildFly Swarm. In addition, OpenShift Application Runtimes includes the Launch Service, which helps developers get up and running quickly in the cloud through a number of ready-to-run examples — or missions — that streamline developer productivity.

New Cache Booster with JBoss Data Grid integration

In our latest continuous delivery release, we have added a new cache mission  that demonstrates how to use a cache to increase the response time of applications.  This mission shows you how to:

  1. Deploy a cache to OpenShift.
  2. Use a cache within an application.

The common use case for this booster is to cache service result sets to decrease latency associated with data access as well as reduce workload on backend service.  Another very common use case is to reduce the data volume of message send across in distributed system.

Continue reading “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes: Delivering new productivity, performance, and stronger standards support with its latest sprint release”

#RHSummit: A Random Sampling of Awesome Sessions and Events Throughout the Week

There are around 500 sessions crammed into a speedy three day schedule — so it is impossible to catch everything. (That’s one reason that I’m promoting things like theCube streaming channel and recorded sessions on our Youtube channel — it’s a way to catch all the things you can miss, even if you attend something every hour.)

If you haven’t already mapped out everything to see and do, the trailmaps are a great place to start to get the cream of every topic area.

I have created my own, unscientific list of the app dev and middleware-related sessions that caught my eye in the session catalog.

Stuff to Do

There are after-parties most nights, some on site at the Moscone Center and some at the conference hotels. Keep an eye on the signs in the lobbies — there are lists there. For those passionate about app development, middleware, and application architecture:

  • There will be a press panel including Mike Piech (VP of middleware) and Harry Mower (Red Hat Developers) in the Intercontinental Hotel Ballroom A. Space is limited, so it will also be broadcast live on theCube at 11am.
  • There is a rockstar cocktail hour on Wednesday evening, starting at 5:30 in Moscone West.
  • Also on Wednesday, Mike Piech and Mark LIttle will do an interview with theCube. Along with streaming live online, you can see it in person in the Moscone West lobby.
  • The Red Hat Summit wrap party is Thursday night at the Armory, starting at 7pm.

Integration

Trailmap: Integration

Distributed API management in a hybrid cloud environment
Tuesday, 10:30am, Moscone West 2003
Why it’s cool:
This is a real customer story on how they used API management with 3scale to manage thousands of services across a hybrid environment.

Practitioner’s guide to API strategy
Wednesday, 3:30pm, Moscone South 207
Why it’s cool:
Anything with “strategy” in it catches my eye. This session goes over why and how an API initiative should be structured to be successful.

Introducing AMQ streams – data streaming with Apache Kafka
Thursday, 11:15am, Moscone West 2014
Why it’s cool:
Microservices — or any kind of distributed computing system — comes down to a question of managing data. This looks at some new technologies in AMQ so that the messaging platform can span a variety of data architectures, from IoT to enterprise integration to (also) data streaming.

Decompose a monolith with microservices
Thursday, 3:00pm, Moscone West Level 2, Discovery Zone
Why it’s cool:
 Another session hitting the same point — distributed architectures are complex. You need a clear understanding of interdependencies, integration points, and data (among many other things), and this session breaks down what you need to know and best practices for addressing it.

Future Technologies

There are a lot of separate, and separately interesting, technologies on the horizon. The ones that seem to stick out at this Summit revolve around serverless computing or Istio Service Mesh.

Containers, microservices, serverless: On being serverless or serverful
Tuesday, 10:30am, Moscone South 207
Why it’s cool:
Burr Sutter presenting plus serverless and microservices in the title.

Istio: Solving the challenges of hybrid cloud
Tuesday, 3:30pm, Moscone South 208
Why it’s cool:
 This goes over how Istio can be used in an infrastructure that spans OpenShift containers, Kubernetes, and virtual machines. Managing data across environments effectively is a major challenge as applications and services need to be able to scale.

Low-risk mono to microservices: Istio, Teiid, and Spring Boot
Tuesday, 4:30pm, Moscone South 207
Why it’s cool:
This looks at how to break a monolith — fully recognizing that there are no clear-cut boundaries in a monolith and the interdependencies get messy.

An eventful tour from enterprise integration to serverless computing
Wednesday, 10:30am, Moscone South 207
Why it’s cool:
This looks at the different architectural designs and choices for event-driven computing, microservices, messaging, and data management. There isn’t a single perfect solution that works for everyone — each infrastructure has its own priorities and needs, and those have to be reflected in the architecture.

Internet of Things

Trailmap: IoT

Making IoT real across industries
Tuesday, 11:45am, Moscone West 2007
Why it’s cool:
Tell me a story. IoT is essentially a highly complex integration story, integrating not only applications but physical devices. Three different industries — technology, petroleum, and transportation — highlight different aspects of IoT as it was done in real life.

Internet of Things: Open, integrated, managed, and secure
Thursday, 3:00pm, Moscone West 2016
Why it’s cool:
How do you take a cool idea (or a business necessity) and make it happen in real life? This section includes common reference architectures for industrial IoT deployments.

Cloud-native and App Dev

Trailmap: Cloud-native apps

Containerizing applications — existing and new
Wedneesday, 1:00pm, Moscone South 155
Why it’s cool:
Anything practical is immediately appealing. Most organizations aren’t dealing with a greenfield of applications, and this looks at how to move both cloud-native and legacy applications into a container.

Using machine learning, Red Hat BPM, and reactive microservices
Thursday, 11:15am, Moscone West 2004
Why it’s cool:
Business process automation, decision management, event processing — these tend to be treated as commodity actions. The things you have to do to get an application to be more responsive with less intervention. I like the approach of adding machine learning to process management, giving more intelligence to the overall architecture.

Java Awesomeness

Eclipse Microprofile and Wildfly Swarm
Tuesday, 11:45am, Moscone West 2011
Why it’s cool:
There isn’t a ton of Java on this lit (I don’t really know why), but this is definitely a don’t-miss session for Java developers. Wildfly Swarm is a way to create cloud-native, container-native Java applications. So … all your Java expertise, in a tiny container.

EE4J, MicroProfile, and the future of enterprise Java
Wednesday, 3:30pm, Moscone South 215
Why it’s cool:
 There are probably a dozen think-pieces a year on the imminent death of Java — yet it continues to evolve across new architectures and to take on new technologies. This session takes a more optimistic (realistic?) view of the future of Java.

Microservices data patterns: CQRS and event sourcing
Thursday, 11:15am, Moscone South 208
Why it’s cool:
Microservices (as Christian Posta is fond of saying) represent a data challenge. The more distributed the data is, than the more structured and clear the data architecture needs to be.

Crossing the chasm between traditional and agile planning
Tuesday, 1:45pm, Moscone West 2103
Why it’s cool:
Teams are people. Technology has to be developed and executed and maintained by people. Making any kind of shift, whether changing the planning structure or the infrastructure architecture or something else, requires an understanding of how to manage and inspire teams.

 

#RHSummit: Plug in (whether you’re here or not)

Red Hat Summit — the unofficial start of summer technology discussions and the official conference for all things open source — begins tomorrow. For attendees, there are a handful of links to keep handy so that you can hit the sessions, booths, demos, and after-hours events that make Summit so awesome.

Even if you can’t attend this year (or since, realistically, no human being can attend everything going on at Summit), here is a round-up of social media channels and people to follow so you can dip your toe into the Summit experience.

**NEW** Interesting Personal Accounts

A lot of the people presenting at Summit or working in the DevZone and Partner booths have a social media presence all their own. It’s definitely worth tracking what they’re doing at Summit, and after. A handful:

Live-streaming Summit

All of the Red Hat Summit general sessions will be live-streamed on theCube, along with interviews and round tables throughout the day. Previous years’ Summits are also available in theCube archives or on our Red Hat Summit YouTube channel.

Live streams of note:

  • Morning general sessions, Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30am
  • Press conference, with live Q&A, Tuesday, 11am
  • Afternoon general sessions, Tuesday and Wednesday, 1:45pm
  • The Future of Java interview with Mike Piech and Mark Little, Wednesday
  • Closing general session, Thursday, 8:30

Summit-Specific Accounts

Follow the #RHSummit hastag — use it to be part of the conversation.

Middleware-Related Social Media

Main Red Hat Sites

Jakarta EE is officially out

Jakarta EE is officially out! OK, given the amount of publicity and evangelising we and others have done around EE4J and Jakarta EE over the past few months, you would be forgiven for thinking it was already the case, but it wasn’t … until today!

I cannot stress enough how important this is to our industry. The number of Java™ developers globally is estimated at over 14 million. The Java EE market is estimated at a high multi-billion dollar value to the industry. Yes, there are other languages out there and other frameworks but none of them have yet made the impact Java™ and Java EE has over the years. Of course, Java EE was not perfect for a variety of reasons, but if you consider how much of an impact it has had on the industry given known and debated limitations, just imagine how much it can bring in the years ahead if it were improved.

With the release of Jakarta EE, we all have a chance to collaborate and build on the good things it inherits, whilst at the same time working to evolve those pieces which are no longer relevant or perhaps never were quite what was needed. Working within the open processes of the Eclipse Foundation vendors, Java™ communities, individuals etc. are all able to interact as peers with no one vendor holding a higher role than another. We’ve seen this exact same process work extremely well in a relatively short period of time with Eclipse MicroProfile and I believe Jakarta EE can do at least as well.

When talking about Java EE and now Jakarta EE some often focus only on the technologies. Fortunately, those of us who have been in the open source world long enough appreciate that the community is just as important. With Jakarta EE, all of us involved in working towards the release hope that we can use it as a catalyst to bring together often disparate Java™ communities under a single banner. Too often, Java EE has been a divisive topic for some vendors and some communities, resulting in fractures and often working on the same problems but pulling in different directions. If Jakarta EE does only one thing, and that is bringing everyone together to collaborate, then I would still deem it a success!

I’ll finish by discussing why Red Hat® has been helping to lead this effort along with others. I can summarise this pretty easily: enterprise Java™ remains critical to our customers and communities, and we believe that despite the increase of other languages and frameworks, it should remain so for many years to come. Red Hat, and JBoss® before it, has contributed to J2EE™, Java EE, and Eclipse MicroProfile for years, and we believe that sharing our experiences and working on open source implementations is important for the industry as a whole, no matter what language you may be using. We believe it’s important to leverage Jakarta EE in the cloud and to a wider range of communities than in the past. We’re here to stay and will continue to help lead!

Onward!

To learn more, join these upcoming live sessions:

Red Hat makes Node.js a first-class citizen on OpenShift with RHOAR, by Conor O’Neill, nearForm

Red Hat’s offering in cloud-native application development has just taken another step forward with the announcement of supported Node.js. Conor O’Neill from our partner nearForm shares his thoughts on the role that Node.js and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) will take in Red Hat’s market leadership in Cloud-Native application development, modernization and migration.

Read more here: Red Hat makes Node.js a first-class citizen on OpenShift with RHOAR, by Conor O’Neill, nearForm

Luis I. Cortes. Senior Manager, Middleware Partner Strategy – @licortes_redhat

Learning Process Driven Application Development with JBoss BPM

Are you interested in an introduction to the concepts of process management (BPM)?

Do you want to learn how your business can leverage process driven application delivery?

Are you looking for an easy to understand guide to mastering Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite tooling?

Do you want a step-by-step introduction to setting up JBoss BPM Suite, then coverage of practical and important topics like data modeling, designing business rules and processes,  detailed real world examples, and tips for testing?

For the last few years I’ve been working on putting years of working with JBoss BPM Suite, community projects Drools and jBPM together in one easy to understand book.

In 2017, Red Hat put the first chapter online for free and literally thousands downloaded it starting their journey on the road to delivering process driven application with JBoss BPM Suite. Many of you have reached out over the years to ask about the completion of this book and where you can get it.

The good news isthat the book is available and Red Hat’s providing ebook downloads for free!

Let’s look at how this works, shall we?

Continue reading “Learning Process Driven Application Development with JBoss BPM”

Cloud Native Application Development – Adopt or Fail

In today’s digital world, software strategy is central to business strategy. To stay competitive, organizations need customized software applications to meet their unique needs — from customer engagements to new product and services development. Drawn-out development projects are no longer acceptable, given business demands. Therefore, the need to speed up application development, testing, delivery, and deployment is no longer optional but a must-have competency.   

At the same time that developers are confronting this challenge to deliver solutions more quickly, they are also facing the most diverse technology ecosystem in the history of computing.  To address this challenge, development teams must modernize architecture, infrastructure, and processes to deliver higher-quality applications with greater agility.

Cloud native development is an approach to building and running applications that fully exploits the advantages of the cloud computing model.  Cloud native development multidimensionality involves architecture, infrastructure, and processes based upon four key tenets:

  1. Services-based architecture: could be microservices or any modular loosely coupled model for independent scalability and flexibility of maintenance and polyglot language runtimes.
  2. Containers and Docker image: as the deployment unit and self-contained execution environment with consistency and portability across cloud infrastructures.
  3. DevOps automation: implementing processes and practices and instrumentation of development to test deployment of applications.     
  4. API-based design: The only communication allowed is via service interface calls over the network. No direct linking, no direct reads of another team’s data store, no shared-memory model with an outside- in perspective.

Continue reading “Cloud Native Application Development – Adopt or Fail”

Announcing Red Hat Fuse 7.0 Technical Preview 3

On November 2, 2017, we announced the technical preview of a new low-code integration platform called Red Hat Fuse Online. This technical preview provided a first chance for users to experience the new platform and provide feedback.

Building on the feedback we’ve received with the  Red Hat Fuse Online technical preview, we are happy to announce the Red Hat Fuse 7.0 technical preview 3 (TP3).

Continue reading “Announcing Red Hat Fuse 7.0 Technical Preview 3”

A DevOps approach to decision management

Sometimes we would like to change the behavior of an application fast. I mean, really fast.

Traditional development cycles for enterprise applications take weeks if not months for a new version to be ready in production. Even in the world of DevOps, containers, and microservices, where we can spin up new versions of an app in days, or even hours, we need to go through development cycles that are too far away from the business users.

Welcome to the world of business rules and decision services, along with low code development.

Continue reading “A DevOps approach to decision management”

“Micro-rules,” event-driven apps, and Red Hat Decision Manager

As we described in an earlier blog, microservices are mini-applications which are devoted to a single, specific function. They are discrete (independent of other services in the architecture), polyglot with a common messaging or API interface, and they have well-defined parameters.

As application development and IT operations teams have started streamlining and speeding up their processes with methodologies like Agile and DevOps, they have increasingly begun treating IT applications as microservices. This breaks up potential bottlenecks, reduces dependencies on services used by other teams, and can help make IT infrastructure less rigid and more distributed.

One area where we are seeing this looser, more distributed approach to service development is with business rules.

“Micro-rules”

Business rules and processes in a traditional structure tend to be centralized, with the complete set of functionality defined for all workflows. The problem with centralization is because there is a single, centralized collection of business rules, any changes to one set of rules can affect many other sets, even those for different business functions.

Micro-rules essentially treat each functional set of rules as its own service — well-defined, highly focused, and independent of other rules.

Figure – Function rule sets as micro-rules

Continue reading ““Micro-rules,” event-driven apps, and Red Hat Decision Manager”