Eclipse Glassfish 5.1 RC-1 Release

Today the first candidate release of the Eclipse Glassfish server targeting the new Jakarta EE 8 release is available. This was a huge effort to move the Glassfish source repositories over to the Eclipse github organization. It was accompanied by the move of TCK project as well. You can read about the details in Dmitry Kornilov’s blog here.

Red Hat’s Support of Jakarta EE

Red Hat is committed to supporting the evolution of enterprise Java at Eclipse and has been focusing on development of the Eclipse Jakarta EE specification process as well as helping with getting the migrated projects and TCK projects running under the eclipse CI infrastructure.

The new specification process is a replacement for the Java Community Process (JCP) used to develop the Java EE specification through Java EE 8. It provides a fully open source based process that includes specifications, APIs and TCKs. The Eclipse Jakarta EE specification process will be used to develop the next generation of the EE4J specifications. Mike Milinkovich has written about the current process draft status in detail here. The initial draft is in public review, so I recommend you take the opportunity to browse through it and make comments on the draft document provided in Mike’s blog post.

Introducing Technical Reports

RHAMT 4.1.0 Is Released!

The 4.1.0 version of the Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit has recently been released, and with it is a new report that I’d like to highlight.

If you’re not familiar with RHAMT, check out my previous article introducing the product.

Technology Reports

One of the RHAMT features mentioned at this year’s summit were the Technology Reports.

This report provides an aggregate listing of the technologies used, grouped by function, for the analyzed applications. It shows how the technologies are distributed, and hundreds of applications can be simultaneously compared after analysis has been performed. In addition, the size, number of libraries, and story point totals of each application are displayed, allowing you to quickly determine each application’s type from a single report.

Examining application_13 in the above list, we can see that this is likely a secured frontend application with a cache for performance. It contains several libraries, most of which pertain to security in some form.

Each application can be further examined to identify the technologies in use. For instance, drilling down into application_13 shows:

Here we can see that the precise libraries in use within each category. As previously noted, this application uses a large number of security libraries, and we can precisely identify the technologies in use.

Regardless of how you use the technology reports, I’m certain it will be useful in your migration and modernization efforts.

#RHSummit: A Random Sampling of Awesome Sessions and Events Throughout the Week

There are around 500 sessions crammed into a speedy three day schedule — so it is impossible to catch everything. (That’s one reason that I’m promoting things like theCube streaming channel and recorded sessions on our Youtube channel — it’s a way to catch all the things you can miss, even if you attend something every hour.)

If you haven’t already mapped out everything to see and do, the trailmaps are a great place to start to get the cream of every topic area.

I have created my own, unscientific list of the app dev and middleware-related sessions that caught my eye in the session catalog.

Stuff to Do

There are after-parties most nights, some on site at the Moscone Center and some at the conference hotels. Keep an eye on the signs in the lobbies — there are lists there. For those passionate about app development, middleware, and application architecture:

  • There will be a press panel including Mike Piech (VP of middleware) and Harry Mower (Red Hat Developers) in the Intercontinental Hotel Ballroom A. Space is limited, so it will also be broadcast live on theCube at 11am.
  • There is a rockstar cocktail hour on Wednesday evening, starting at 5:30 in Moscone West.
  • Also on Wednesday, Mike Piech and Mark LIttle will do an interview with theCube. Along with streaming live online, you can see it in person in the Moscone West lobby.
  • The Red Hat Summit wrap party is Thursday night at the Armory, starting at 7pm.

Integration

Trailmap: Integration

Distributed API management in a hybrid cloud environment
Tuesday, 10:30am, Moscone West 2003
Why it’s cool:
This is a real customer story on how they used API management with 3scale to manage thousands of services across a hybrid environment.

Practitioner’s guide to API strategy
Wednesday, 3:30pm, Moscone South 207
Why it’s cool:
Anything with “strategy” in it catches my eye. This session goes over why and how an API initiative should be structured to be successful.

Introducing AMQ streams – data streaming with Apache Kafka
Thursday, 11:15am, Moscone West 2014
Why it’s cool:
Microservices — or any kind of distributed computing system — comes down to a question of managing data. This looks at some new technologies in AMQ so that the messaging platform can span a variety of data architectures, from IoT to enterprise integration to (also) data streaming.

Decompose a monolith with microservices
Thursday, 3:00pm, Moscone West Level 2, Discovery Zone
Why it’s cool:
 Another session hitting the same point — distributed architectures are complex. You need a clear understanding of interdependencies, integration points, and data (among many other things), and this session breaks down what you need to know and best practices for addressing it.

Future Technologies

There are a lot of separate, and separately interesting, technologies on the horizon. The ones that seem to stick out at this Summit revolve around serverless computing or Istio Service Mesh.

Containers, microservices, serverless: On being serverless or serverful
Tuesday, 10:30am, Moscone South 207
Why it’s cool:
Burr Sutter presenting plus serverless and microservices in the title.

Istio: Solving the challenges of hybrid cloud
Tuesday, 3:30pm, Moscone South 208
Why it’s cool:
 This goes over how Istio can be used in an infrastructure that spans OpenShift containers, Kubernetes, and virtual machines. Managing data across environments effectively is a major challenge as applications and services need to be able to scale.

Low-risk mono to microservices: Istio, Teiid, and Spring Boot
Tuesday, 4:30pm, Moscone South 207
Why it’s cool:
This looks at how to break a monolith — fully recognizing that there are no clear-cut boundaries in a monolith and the interdependencies get messy.

An eventful tour from enterprise integration to serverless computing
Wednesday, 10:30am, Moscone South 207
Why it’s cool:
This looks at the different architectural designs and choices for event-driven computing, microservices, messaging, and data management. There isn’t a single perfect solution that works for everyone — each infrastructure has its own priorities and needs, and those have to be reflected in the architecture.

Internet of Things

Trailmap: IoT

Making IoT real across industries
Tuesday, 11:45am, Moscone West 2007
Why it’s cool:
Tell me a story. IoT is essentially a highly complex integration story, integrating not only applications but physical devices. Three different industries — technology, petroleum, and transportation — highlight different aspects of IoT as it was done in real life.

Internet of Things: Open, integrated, managed, and secure
Thursday, 3:00pm, Moscone West 2016
Why it’s cool:
How do you take a cool idea (or a business necessity) and make it happen in real life? This section includes common reference architectures for industrial IoT deployments.

Cloud-native and App Dev

Trailmap: Cloud-native apps

Containerizing applications — existing and new
Wedneesday, 1:00pm, Moscone South 155
Why it’s cool:
Anything practical is immediately appealing. Most organizations aren’t dealing with a greenfield of applications, and this looks at how to move both cloud-native and legacy applications into a container.

Using machine learning, Red Hat BPM, and reactive microservices
Thursday, 11:15am, Moscone West 2004
Why it’s cool:
Business process automation, decision management, event processing — these tend to be treated as commodity actions. The things you have to do to get an application to be more responsive with less intervention. I like the approach of adding machine learning to process management, giving more intelligence to the overall architecture.

Java Awesomeness

Eclipse Microprofile and Wildfly Swarm
Tuesday, 11:45am, Moscone West 2011
Why it’s cool:
There isn’t a ton of Java on this lit (I don’t really know why), but this is definitely a don’t-miss session for Java developers. Wildfly Swarm is a way to create cloud-native, container-native Java applications. So … all your Java expertise, in a tiny container.

EE4J, MicroProfile, and the future of enterprise Java
Wednesday, 3:30pm, Moscone South 215
Why it’s cool:
 There are probably a dozen think-pieces a year on the imminent death of Java — yet it continues to evolve across new architectures and to take on new technologies. This session takes a more optimistic (realistic?) view of the future of Java.

Microservices data patterns: CQRS and event sourcing
Thursday, 11:15am, Moscone South 208
Why it’s cool:
Microservices (as Christian Posta is fond of saying) represent a data challenge. The more distributed the data is, than the more structured and clear the data architecture needs to be.

Crossing the chasm between traditional and agile planning
Tuesday, 1:45pm, Moscone West 2103
Why it’s cool:
Teams are people. Technology has to be developed and executed and maintained by people. Making any kind of shift, whether changing the planning structure or the infrastructure architecture or something else, requires an understanding of how to manage and inspire teams.

 

#RHSummit: Plug in (whether you’re here or not)

Red Hat Summit — the unofficial start of summer technology discussions and the official conference for all things open source — begins tomorrow. For attendees, there are a handful of links to keep handy so that you can hit the sessions, booths, demos, and after-hours events that make Summit so awesome.

Even if you can’t attend this year (or since, realistically, no human being can attend everything going on at Summit), here is a round-up of social media channels and people to follow so you can dip your toe into the Summit experience.

**NEW** Interesting Personal Accounts

A lot of the people presenting at Summit or working in the DevZone and Partner booths have a social media presence all their own. It’s definitely worth tracking what they’re doing at Summit, and after. A handful:

Live-streaming Summit

All of the Red Hat Summit general sessions will be live-streamed on theCube, along with interviews and round tables throughout the day. Previous years’ Summits are also available in theCube archives or on our Red Hat Summit YouTube channel.

Live streams of note:

  • Morning general sessions, Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30am
  • Press conference, with live Q&A, Tuesday, 11am
  • Afternoon general sessions, Tuesday and Wednesday, 1:45pm
  • The Future of Java interview with Mike Piech and Mark Little, Wednesday
  • Closing general session, Thursday, 8:30

Summit-Specific Accounts

Follow the #RHSummit hastag — use it to be part of the conversation.

Middleware-Related Social Media

Main Red Hat Sites

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Availability

The release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 (JBoss EAP) is now available. JBoss EAP is Red Hat’s middleware platform, built on open standards and compliant with the Java Enterprise Edition 7 specification, which includes a modular structure that provides service enabling only when required, improving startup speed, memory footprint and performance. Included in this minor release are a broad set of updates to existing features. In addition, the release provides new functionality in the areas of security, management, HA, and performance, such as a new additional security framework that unifies security across the entire application server, CLI and web console enhancements, and load balancing profile, respectively. Also included are additions to capabilities related to the simplification of components such as a new additional EJB Client library, HTTP/2 Support and the ability to replace the JSF implementation as well as the JBoss Server Migration Tool to migrate from previous versions of JBoss EAP to JBoss EAP 7.1. With these new capabilities, customers can continue to reduce maintenance time and effort, simplify security, and deliver applications faster and more frequently, all with improved efficiency.

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Availability”

Introducing OpenShift Application Runtimes Public Beta

Executive Summary

  • Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes is now in public beta, meaning you can try it!
  • Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes includes a collection of supported application runtimes.
  • Each runtime is designed to simplify cloud-native development by using Red Hat OpenShift capabilities in a manner natural to the language runtime.
  • Try it! Go to developers.redhat.com/rhoar. Choose an example and runtime, and watch it get forked to your github account and deployed to OpenShift. Feedback welcome on StackOverflow.

Continue reading “Introducing OpenShift Application Runtimes Public Beta”

Swagger/OpenAPI for Enterprise Java microservices

On June 13, 2017, SmartBear joined the Eclipse MicroProfile project, an open source community specification for Enterprise Java microservices.  As someone interested in microservices, why is this news important?

Microservices and microservice architectures have been in vogue now for a couple of years and IT organizations are rushing to implement (or re-factor) their applications using these new ways of architecting and developing solutions because they are digital transformation enablers (together with CI/CD and containers, among others) that allow them to deliver solutions to the business at faster speeds than ever before. In addition, Java is still ranked as #1 or #2 in programming language use and Enterprise Java, in the form of Java EE specification and implementation, has been used to implement enterprise-grade applications for many years by developers, who can now apply their vast Enterprise Java experience to the implementation of microservices.  The Eclipse MicroProfile open source project fulfills the need in the market for a specification for microservices for Enterprise Java that can mature and evolve commensurately with digital business requirements. Eclipse MicroProfile, as a specification for Enterprise Java microservices, leverages some of Java EE, such as CDI, JAX-RS, JSON-P (no need to recreate the wheel), and adds new APIs1 (config, fault tolerance, security, health check, metrics, etc.) for a complete specification to implement enterprise-grade microservices in Java.

As microservices are leveraged across business applications, consumed across organizational/departmental boundaries, or offered for external consumption (outside the firewall), their management can become unwieldy. Microservices enabling technologies, such as Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, provide an integrated registry (OpenShift Container Platform can integrate with external registries as well) that ameliorates this situation.  Another management option for microservices is an API management solution. The only entry/exit point in/out of a microservice is its API and an API management solution can manage APIs by applying policies (security, management, throttling, load balancing, etc.) to them, keeping track of them in an internal catalog and giving insight into their usage.  This is why there is a strong synergy between API Management and microservices.

SmartBear Software, the company behind the popular Swagger/OpenAPI framework for defining and creating RESTful APIs, has a long history open source API testing and development tools. There are many REST API description languages in the market, such as RAML, WADL, API Blueprint, WSDL 2.0, but Swagger/OpenAPI is widely recognized as the most popular open source framework for defining and creating RESTful APIs and has become the market de-facto standard, which means that any successful API-related solution must be either based in or provide support via translation to Swagger. As an example, a very successful API management solution is Red Hat 3scale, which supports Swagger/OpenAPI.

The success of any new technology hinges a lot on the ecosystem that surrounds it (or that it is part of).  If it is diverse and rich in options then the technology will thrive and adoption will follow. By definition, microservices and microservices architecture encompass a large ecosystem of programming languages (they are language and technology agnostic, in fact), such as Java, Java EE, Go, PHP, Python, and platforms, such as Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). However, a variety of microservices-enabling open source technologies have also come about in recent years, like WildFly Swarm, Vert.x, Node.js, OpenAPI, MicroProfile, Istio. So, the microservices ecosystem is growing and will continue to grow as businesses continue their digital transformation.

As mentioned above, there is a strong synergy and relationship between API management and microservices and SmartBear joining MicroProfile is bringing OpenAPI, the most popular REST API description language, into the MicroProfile ecosystem.

For more information on JBoss EAP, please see: https://developers.redhat.com/products/eap/download

For more information on RHOAR, please see: https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2017/07/06/openshift-application-runtimes

For more information on Red Hat 3scale, please see:

https://www.redhat.com/en/technologies/jboss-middleware/3scale/get-started

1 – New APIs are currently Work-In-Process or part of Eclipse MicroProfile roadmap

New Open Source Project for Agile Integration in Low Code Environments

At Red Hat Summit this week, Paul Cormier, executive vice president and president, Products and Technologies, demonstrated three stages of application modernization:

  1. rehosting / refactoring a monolithic app
  2. extending that app with OpenShift.io
  3. demoing how to manage applications and services in an integration platform as a service (iPaaS)

The iPaaS demonstration was the first public view of a new open source project focusing on low code integration capabilities on OpenShift.  The new project is available in open source as http://syndesis.io, and community members are encouraged to become involved in the project over the next several milestones.  

iPaaS provides a low code capability that supports non-technical users, that can quickly build integrations between common systems and data, but which is also built upon technology that supports full scale, mission critical enterprise integration projects.

What It Is

  • Syndesis provides an iPaaS implementation built on  Red Hat Fuse and Red Hat OpenShift technologies
  • The easy-to-use cloud-native integration toolset allows a low-code web interface to:
    • Create, connect and manage integrations quickly (no installation needed)
    • Create and connect APIs (using web based tooling)
    • Point and click tools to build, test & deploy integrations
    • Pre-built connectors to connect multiple apps and services
    • Build simple to complex connections
  • Built on Red Hat Fuse and Red Hat OpenShift, allowing the same underlying technology proven for large scale or sophisticated deployments

Why This Is Different

  • Syndesis is a curation of multiple open source communities, focusing on providing a fully open source iPaaS, low-code environment based on Apache Camel, Red Hat Fuse, etc.
  • Focused on supporting the agile integration methodology
  • Fully integrated with Kubernetes and Linux containers (Docker/Moby)
  • Enables ubiquitous integrations: API-based hybrid integrations across on-premise, private or public cloud
  • Can be extended  with additional capabilities like Red Hat 3scale API Management, Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite, Red Hat JBoss BRMS and Red Hat JBoss Data Grid

What To Do Next

Announcing: Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.1 GA Is Available

We are proud to announce general availability of Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.1 (RH-SSO). RH-SSO is a standards-based, out-of-the-box authentication, web single sign-on, and authorization service, which mediates between your enterprise user directory or third-party identity provider for identity information and your applications via standards-based tokens.

Documentation and downloads are available in the Customer Portal. RPM packages are available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7 systems through Red Hat Subscription Management.

Features and Highlights

OPENID CONNECT CERTIFICATION

The Keycloak version included in Red Hat Single Sign-On (RH-SSO) 7.1 conforms to the 5 OpenID Connect profiles: Basic, Implicit, Hybrid, Config, and Dynamic. Certification was achieved in Keycloak v2.3 (http://openid.net/certification/). Future RH-SSO versions will remain compatible with these profiles, unless documented otherwise.

 

CLIENT ADAPTER FOR RED HAT FUSE

RH-SSO 7.1 features a new client adapter for Red Hat Fuse, which enables securing web application archives (WARs), servlets, Apache routes and Apache CXF endpoints deployed on Red Hat Fuse, in both Apache Karaf and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP).

 

NODE.JS CLIENT ADAPTER

RH-SSO 7.1 includes a new Node.js client adapter, which enables use of RH-SSO 7.1 Server for authentication and web single sign-on for Node.js applications.

 

EXTERNALIZED AUTHORIZATION SERVICE

RH-SSO 7.1 introduces a new authorization service feature-set, based on the User Managed Access specification. This enables RH-SSO 7.1 Server to act as a policy administration point, policy decision point, or policy information point, separating the authorization logic from the application.

 

USER STORAGE SPI

RH-SSO 7.1 features a new user storage SPI that you can use to implement your own custom user storage federation provider, such as a relational or NoSQL database, to enable federation of users from any user store.

 

SSSD INTEGRATION

RH-SSO 7.1 adds an integration with System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.3. This enables use of SSSD as a user federation provider in front of a Microsoft Active Directory forest.

 

CLIENT REGISTRATION CLI

RH SSO 7.1 introduces a command-line interface (CLI) for developers to register client applications on RH-SSO Server.

 

Five Links: Amazon Broke the World Edition

Happy Friday, everyone.

In the most cruelest of cuts, Amazon killed the internet for several hours on Tuesday. The one upside is that it was more real-life evidence that some IT intern would probably fat-finger a Skynet password and stop Judgment Day before it ever begins. In honor of those lost, dark hours, this week’s post is about the times that the internet and technology have let us down. Nightmare fuel, it is.

giphy

Continue reading “Five Links: Amazon Broke the World Edition”