Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.2 Availability

The release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.2 (JBoss EAP), Red Hat’s flagship middleware offering for enterprise Java, is now available.  Organizations around the globe trust and rely on JBoss EAP, a Java-EE compliant application server, to run their production workloads in on-premise, virtualized, containerized, and private, public, and hybrid cloud environments. With this release, Red Hat reaffirms its continued commitment to Java EE 8 as well as Jakarta EE, the new home for cloud-native Java, a community-driven specification under the Eclipse Foundation.

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.2 Availability”

The wait is over: JBoss Web Server 5 with Tomcat 9 is here!

We are excited to announce the general availability of Red Hat JBoss Web Server 5.0 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the technology preview of transactions processing with Narayana. JWS 5 is available through zip, RPM, Maven repository, and the Red Hat Container Catalog.

Red Hat JBoss Web Server combines market-leading open source technologies with enterprise capabilities to provide a single solution for large-scale websites and lightweight web applications. It combines the world’s most deployed web server (Apache) with the top servlet engine (Tomcat) and excellent support for middleware (ours).

Continue reading “The wait is over: JBoss Web Server 5 with Tomcat 9 is here!”

Process management and business logic for responsive cloud-native applications: Red Hat Process Automation Manager is released

Today, Red Hat announced the latest major release of its business process suite, with a new name and several major changes that pivot the focus of the product itself. Red Hat Process Automation Manager is about more than providing a business process modeler or optimizing resource allocation. This is the first generation (at Red Hat) of a digital automation platform — a hub where business users and technical developers can collaborate to create strategically-relevant, intelligent applications.

Red Hat Process Automation Manager has two core conceptual areas:

  • The first is based on decision management (the “intelligent” part of intelligent or even-driven applications). This includes the decision engine of Red Hat Decision Manager and allows automated, immediate responses to interactions, from event processing to resource optimization.
  • Second, Process Automation Manager provides the means of modeling and applying business logic within an application. In combination with a graphical UI, these creates a platform for business users to be able to design business logic in collaboration with the technical teams.

New feature: Process management + case management

The heart of a BPM platform is the “BP” — business process modeling. The previous BPM Suite supported BPMN, the notation specification for business process models, and DMN, the notation specification for data models. The assumption behind a lot of these specs is that the workflows or processes being modeled are relatively static or sequential. For certain types of business processes, that is an accurate assumption (things like resource optimization or scheduling). However, in many organizations, there are also processes which are not linear or which may follow different steps in a dynamic sequence or may be interrupted or require human intervention at certain points. These are generally defined within a related notation specification, Case Management Model Notation (CMMN).

While there are differences, there is also a lot of conceptual overlap between business processes / BPMN and case management processes / CMMN. Process Automation Manager combines the functionality of both process models and case management models within a single digital automation platform. (This is covered in more detail in the blog post here.)

Supporting both linear process / task models and dynamic or unpredictable case management models within the same platform allows developers to have a simpler development process (and, combined with other features like Process Automation Manager’s new graphical UI, makes collaboration with business users easier).

Process Automation Manager also supports other types of modeling and visualizing data and worflows:

  • Data modeling
  • Decision modeling
  • Custom data dashboards
  • Process simulations

New Feature: An easier way for business users to collaborate (graphical UI)

Previous versions of Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite were designed around business process logic, but were intended to be used by Java developers within the application development process. Beginning with this Process Automation Manager 7.0 release, there is a new Entando UI included with the platform. This provides an easier, graphical interface where business users can just drag and drop elements into their models — using ultimately the same platform that the developers are using to create the application. Business processes, rules, and logic can be written into the application essentially without having to write a single line of code.

This also effectively changes the workflow for creating event- and process-driven application. Previously, developers did all the work within their development environment. Now, business users can work in parallel (using the Process Automation Manager UI) to create artifacts which can be pulled into the developer’s IDE and code. Everything can then be packaged up and deployed in containers or other environments.

New feature: Cloud (and container) native applications

With more distributed, hybrid infrastructures, it is imperative that applications be able to function exactly the same regardless of the underlying platform. And those applications need to be designed, natively, to work in a distributed, dynamic environment so that they can be rapidly deployed, updated, or scaled.

Process Automation Manager can itself run in Red Hat OpenShift containers, in public or private clouds, on-premise, or in all environments — depending on the needs of your development and infrastructure teams. Additionally, the models and applications created using Process Automation Manager as a platform can be deployed into cloud instances, OpenShift containers, or local instances. This allows truly hybrid development, testing, and production environments.

Process Automation Manager components, applications, and models can all be exposed and accessed using REST APIs, allowing integration with other software applications or management tools.

Additional Resources

  • Dive a little deeper into process automation technology with our tech overview.
  • For general information about the Process Automation Manager, check out the datasheet.
  • There are different use cases for process automation and a business decision engine. The FAQ runs through some things to consider.
  • Get started by actually using the Process Automation Manager. Red Hat Developers has a whole “hello world” example, waiting for you.

Announcing: Red Hat Fuse 7 is now available

After several technical previews over the last few months, Red Hat Fuse is officially available. This is a significant release, both for Fuse itself and for integration platforms, because it represents a shift from more traditional, on-premise, centralized integration architecture to distributed, hybrid environment integration architecture.

Integration itself has historically been a bottleneck for infrastructure design and changes. The integration points were largely centralized and controlled by a central team in an attempt to manage dependencies and standardize data management between applications. However, that centralization also made change difficult, and it was governed more by procedure and bureaucracy than business innovation. As with traditional infrastructure architecture more generally, integration has not historically been an agile or adaptive architecture.

Red Hat Fuse (and related community projects) is the beginning of a departure from traditional, rigid integration platforms to more agile, distributed integration design. Fuse introduces three major features in the latest release:

  • Fuse Online, fully hosted Fuse applications and integrations. Fuse Online provides immediate access to the functionality of Fuse, without having to install and configure it on-premise. Developers can begin testing and customizing integrations immediately. Connectors can be uploaded to the online development area to allow even more integrations.
  • Fuse container images for Red Hat OpenShift. Fuse runs natively on OpenShift, allowing local, containerized integration points to be created in development teams and to be designed, tested, and updated within DevOps workflows as part of the overall application development cycle.
  • A drag-and-drop UI for integration pattern design. While integration development is typically done within IT teams, integration design relies on business knowledge. Business managers and analysts need to be able to collaborate effectively with their development teams. The new Fuse Ignite UI (based on the Syndesis.io project) is a lowcode way to develop integration — business users can use design elements to create integration architectures and to work with their development teams, within the same tool set.

These three features allow more agile integration development. Fuse installations can span online, on-premise, or container based environments without reducing functionality. This allows an integration platform that crosses environments, and be as lightweight and decentralized as an individual development team or an enterprise-wide platform. The lowcode UI allows business users to be brought directly into the application development cycle, enabling business logic to be incorporated into the integration application design from the beginning.

Additionally, Fuse 7 contains these new features:

  • Support for Spring Boot deployment for Fuse applications
  • 50 new application connectors (with a total of over 200 included connectors)
  • A new monitoring subsystem
  • Updated component versions, including new versions of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform and Apache Camel
  • A new name (Red Hat Fuse, rather than Red Hat JBoss Fuse)

 

Additional Resources

Jakarta EE is officially out

Jakarta EE is officially out! OK, given the amount of publicity and evangelising we and others have done around EE4J and Jakarta EE over the past few months, you would be forgiven for thinking it was already the case, but it wasn’t … until today!

I cannot stress enough how important this is to our industry. The number of Java™ developers globally is estimated at over 14 million. The Java EE market is estimated at a high multi-billion dollar value to the industry. Yes, there are other languages out there and other frameworks but none of them have yet made the impact Java™ and Java EE has over the years. Of course, Java EE was not perfect for a variety of reasons, but if you consider how much of an impact it has had on the industry given known and debated limitations, just imagine how much it can bring in the years ahead if it were improved.

With the release of Jakarta EE, we all have a chance to collaborate and build on the good things it inherits, whilst at the same time working to evolve those pieces which are no longer relevant or perhaps never were quite what was needed. Working within the open processes of the Eclipse Foundation vendors, Java™ communities, individuals etc. are all able to interact as peers with no one vendor holding a higher role than another. We’ve seen this exact same process work extremely well in a relatively short period of time with Eclipse MicroProfile and I believe Jakarta EE can do at least as well.

When talking about Java EE and now Jakarta EE some often focus only on the technologies. Fortunately, those of us who have been in the open source world long enough appreciate that the community is just as important. With Jakarta EE, all of us involved in working towards the release hope that we can use it as a catalyst to bring together often disparate Java™ communities under a single banner. Too often, Java EE has been a divisive topic for some vendors and some communities, resulting in fractures and often working on the same problems but pulling in different directions. If Jakarta EE does only one thing, and that is bringing everyone together to collaborate, then I would still deem it a success!

I’ll finish by discussing why Red Hat® has been helping to lead this effort along with others. I can summarise this pretty easily: enterprise Java™ remains critical to our customers and communities, and we believe that despite the increase of other languages and frameworks, it should remain so for many years to come. Red Hat, and JBoss® before it, has contributed to J2EE™, Java EE, and Eclipse MicroProfile for years, and we believe that sharing our experiences and working on open source implementations is important for the industry as a whole, no matter what language you may be using. We believe it’s important to leverage Jakarta EE in the cloud and to a wider range of communities than in the past. We’re here to stay and will continue to help lead!

Onward!

To learn more, join these upcoming live sessions:

Announcing Red Hat Fuse 7.0 Technical Preview 3

On November 2, 2017, we announced the technical preview of a new low-code integration platform called Red Hat Fuse Online. This technical preview provided a first chance for users to experience the new platform and provide feedback.

Building on the feedback we’ve received with the  Red Hat Fuse Online technical preview, we are happy to announce the Red Hat Fuse 7.0 technical preview 3 (TP3).

Continue reading “Announcing Red Hat Fuse 7.0 Technical Preview 3”

Announcing: Red Hat Decision Manager 7.0 Is Now Available

Red Hat has announced the release of Red Hat Decision Manager 7. Decision Manager is the evolution of Red Hat JBoss BRMS and provides a platform to develop rules-based applications and services.

As applications and services become more central to business strategies, business users will become increasingly involved in the development process. Software that aids in creating applications without directly writing code is known as low-code development. Decision Manager provides tools, including an updated UI and enhanced wizards, that help business users participate more actively in application development.

Major Use Cases

Decision service as a microservice

Decision Manager has a more modular architecture, such as a decision service, an execution server, and a management interface. Each component can be containerized and deployed as an image on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. Developers can create discrete services for specific needs and deploy those “micro-rules” in a microservices architecture. This approach is covered more in another blog post.

Continue reading “Announcing: Red Hat Decision Manager 7.0 Is Now Available”

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Availability

The release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 (JBoss EAP) is now available. JBoss EAP is Red Hat’s middleware platform, built on open standards and compliant with the Java Enterprise Edition 7 specification, which includes a modular structure that provides service enabling only when required, improving startup speed, memory footprint and performance. Included in this minor release are a broad set of updates to existing features. In addition, the release provides new functionality in the areas of security, management, HA, and performance, such as a new additional security framework that unifies security across the entire application server, CLI and web console enhancements, and load balancing profile, respectively. Also included are additions to capabilities related to the simplification of components such as a new additional EJB Client library, HTTP/2 Support and the ability to replace the JSF implementation as well as the JBoss Server Migration Tool to migrate from previous versions of JBoss EAP to JBoss EAP 7.1. With these new capabilities, customers can continue to reduce maintenance time and effort, simplify security, and deliver applications faster and more frequently, all with improved efficiency.

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Availability”

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Beta Availability

The beta release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 (JBoss EAP) is now available. JBoss EAP is Red Hat’s middleware platform, built on open standards and compliant with the Java Enterprise Edition 7 specification. JBoss EAP supports a modular structure that provides service enabling only when required, improving startup speed. Included in this minor release are a broad set of updates to existing features. In addition, the beta release provides new functionality in the areas of security, management, HA, and performance, such as a new additional security framework that unifies security across the entire application server, CLI and web console enhancements, and load balancing profile, respectively. Also included are additions to capabilities related to the simplification of components such as a new additional EJB Client library, HTTP/2 support, and the ability to replace the JSF implementation. With these new capabilities, customers can continue to reduce maintenance time and effort, simplify security, and deliver applications faster and more frequently, all with improved efficiency.

Here are some highlights of the JBoss EAP 7.1 Beta release:

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Beta Availability”

Performance, scale, and real-time analytics: Red Hat JBoss Data Grid 7.1

I am excited to announce the general availability of Red Hat JBoss Data Grid 7.1!  This is the only Red Hat software ranked highly in two separate Forrester waves categories: In-Memory Data Grid and In-Memory Database. On top of that, no other vendor offers any unified in-memory data management solution that is recognized in both waves — JBoss Data Grid is the one product with the versatility to span both categories.

In-memory computing is all about high performance and scale-out architecture. The primary focus of this release to enhance the performance of JBoss Data Grid as an in-memory data management platform for hybrid transactional and analytical (HTAP) workloads.

New Capabilities and Features

  • Performance improvements. JBoss Data Grid 7.1 features core performance improvements, especially in clustered write operations. Current tests have shown up to 60% increase in write throughput under load. (We have modified various default settings to improve JBoss Data Grid performance.)
  • Elastic scale external state management for JBoss Web Server (Tomcat) and Spring applications (on-premise or cloud/Openshift). JBoss Data Grid 7.1 features the ability to externalize HTTP sessions from a JBoss Web Server node to a remote JBoss Data Grid cluster. This helps make the JBoss Web layer stateless and enables a rolling update of the application layer, while retrieving the session data from the JBoss Data Grid layer. Additionally, JBoss Data Grid 7.1 features Spring session support, which enables you to externalize HTTP session from a Spring (or Spring Boot) deployment to a remote JBoss Data Grid cluster.
  • Real-time analytics, through Apache Spark 2.x integration supporting RDD and DStream interfaces.
  • New string-based querying with Ickle (tech preview). JBoss Data Grid 7.1 introduces a new string-based querying language, Ickle, as technology preview,  which enables you to specify combinations of relational and full-text predicates (based on Apache Lucene). This enhances the querying feature-set available in client-server mode by bringing several additional operations that were previously available only in library mode.
  • Ease of administration. Update and save node-level configurations are now available through the administration console.
  • Feature enhancements to Hot Rod clients, including streaming large-sized objects in chunks from the JBoss Data Grid server to a Java client and adding cross-site failover for C++, C# and Node.js clients.

More Resources