From BPM and business automation to digital automation platforms

The business processes that create customer value are the critical piece that links together all of the different aspects of digital transformation. But still, many of the critical activities that contribute to it are either manual or a succession of disconnected workflows or applications that prevent organizations from having an end-to-end view of how their processes deliver customer value.  

Evolving from workflows to BPM – business process management – added a whole collaborative layer and execution structure to the traditional hierarchy and project-based structure of the enterprise. When it was paired with access to the critical data and documents, alongside activity visibility and business rules, it helped to exponentially grow productivity and agility in the enterprise for many years.

Nowadays, enterprises have discovered already how to use these technologies and apply them to work with structured and unstructured processes, to create business rules to guide and support decision making, or the importance of integrating process outputs and inputs in real time to external systems that interact with the processes. These process-centric applications are even cloud-ready so you can run your processes in the cloud and open them up more securely to all of your internal and external collaborators.

But times are changing. Productivity and agility are no longer the name of the game. It is no longer enough to provide ease of use, business, and IT collaboration, or fast modification of processes and rules. Speed and support for digital transformation have become top priorities. Those process-based applications need to be quickly deployed into production, be portable, reusable and consistent across environments, and scaled in the hybrid cloud. Our customers expect cloud-native technologies at the core of their processes. They expect to run their process workloads to scale across the hybrid cloud to provide a consistent experience to their customers and collaborators. Ideally, they also want to future-proof their investments with modern technologies such as containers.

Continue reading “From BPM and business automation to digital automation platforms”

Red Hat present at EclipseCon France 2018

EclipseCon France is taking place this week in Toulouse, France (June 13-14, 2018) and it’s offering a great lineup of top-notch sessions on nine different tracks, from IoT to cloud and modeling technologies. This year, there is even a dedicated track for “Microservices, MicroProfile, EE4J and Jakarta EE,” which is covering topics such as Istio, 12-factor apps, geoscience, machine learning, noSQL database integration, cloud-native application development, security, resilience, scalability, and the latest statuses of the Jakarta EE and MicroProfile open source specification projects. Under this track, we are hosting two sessions:

But we are also delivering other interesting sessions under the “Reactive Programming” track:

Under the “IoT” track:

Under the “Eclipse IDE and RCP in Practice” track:

And, under the “Cloud & DevOps” and “Other Cool Stuff” tracks:

For those of you that will be at the conference, we invite you to attend the sessions above and to stop by the Red Hat booth to learn how Red Hat can help your organization solve your IT challenges (and get your swag too!). And for those of you that would like to learn more about Red Hat offerings in relation to the topics above, please visit the following links:

Why are our Application Platform Partners succeeding in Digital Transformation?

Last year we set out to start the Application Platform Partner Initiative with the objective to enable deeper collaboration with partners focused on application platform and emerging technologies. We planned to create a collaborative go-to-market strategy between Red Hat and participating partner organizations focused on optimizing the value chain for application development and integration projects.

The Application Platform Partner Initiative focuses on Application Development-related and other emerging technology offerings, which revenue increased 42% in our last fiscal year up to $624 million. Partners like the APPs are contributing to this growth and we are happy to see the momentum continuing, and their trust on Red Hat as a strategic partner. What started out as a pilot has developed into a fully fledged initiative with 28 partners across North America, who are as committed as we are to the role opens source plays at the core of digital transformation.

As part of the success of this initiative, for the first time this year, we have created the Application Platform Partner Pavilion in Red Hat Summit.  Arctiq, Crossvale, Kovarus, Levvel, Li9, Lighthouse, OSI, Shadow-Soft, VeriStor and Vizuri will join us this year in the pavilion. Don’t miss a chance to get to know the advanced solutions they have created on top of Openshift and Red Hat Middleware products, which they will be showcasing at Red Hat Summit. Check out, for example, Arctiq Value Stream Mapping (VSM), Crossvale CloudBalancer for Red Hat® OpenShift or Vizuri log aggregation solutions.

These partners are delivering a strong investment in enablement, and commitment in their go-to-market alliance with Red Hat, including co-marketing and sales collaboration. As some examples of planned activities, Arctiq is running a Modern Mobile App Development event and Crossvale an OpenShift roadshow).

Levvel has been an active participant in the APP program, doing joint webinars, customer workshops and panel discussions to promote Red Hat emerging technologies. As a result, they have influenced and closed quite a few customers and have a long list of potential opportunities. Don’t forget to attend their coming up event “App Transformation Workshop: Monoliths to Microservices”!

Shadow-Soft has been particularly focused on growing the customer base with our OpenShift and JBoss product family with innovative sales and marketing strategies that are turning into a growing pipeline of opportunities, and running events around digital transformation.

Veristor joined recently the APP program and is growing rapidly their different practices around OpenShift and Red Hat Middleware, like DevOps and Agile Consulting, Services and Software Development practice.

OSI, an international company with a long experience with JBoss, is also growing in the US and have worked on an Agile Integration demo environment focusing on JBoss Fuse Integration platform to support their customer engagements, including integration with cloud and on-premise systems. Try to attend their “Monoliths to Microservices: App Transformation Workshop” right after Summit.

Vizuri has been a Red Hat partner for over 10 years. Having delivered more than 120 JBoss-related engagements, their JBoss experience and expertise helps customers reduce risk and improve time-to-value, while avoiding project delays and unplanned downtime. You can’t miss their take on How To Manage Business Rules In A Microservices Architecture using OpenShift and JBoss BRMS.

Having recently joined the APP program, Astellent has heavily invested in enablement and marketing, while achieving exciting customer success. Read their views on the newly launched Red Hat Decision Manager 7.

Lighthouse has been helping businesses with the right mix of Red Hat’s public, on-premises, and hybrid cloud technologies, customizing them to fit their unique business needs. They have also been active with unique marketing events like the one with the Red Sox coming in May.

As you can see, APP partners are working closely with Red Hat to establish a sales, marketing, and delivery practice around Red Hat technologies, including Red Hat JBoss Middleware, Red Hat OpenShift, and Red Hat Mobile Application Platform.

In the words of John Bleuer, VP, Strategic Partners, North America, “I am thrilled that as year one of the program ends, the sophistication of our partner solutioning and delivery abilities has increased dramatically; many partners are working with us in industry and line of business (including healthcare, payments, and e-commerce); other partners are adding sophistication into the DevOps / automation practices with Openshift, Jenkins, and Ansible, while others are honing their skills delivering app modernization and integration & BPM solutions in a cloud native environment, containerized in OpenShift.  It’s an exciting time at Red Hat”.

The market is looking to digital transformation initiatives to grow and maintain competitive advantage. Challenges range from confined platforms to complex architectures, from rigid processes to lack of agility. Together with our partners, we can play a critical role to help our customers overcome those to become growing, competitive organizations.

We hope to see you at Red Hat Summit checking them out, as well as at the Red Hat Summit Ecosystem Expo!

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes: Delivering new productivity, performance, and stronger standards support with its latest sprint release

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes is a collection of cloud-native application runtimes that are optimized to run on OpenShift, including Eclipse Vert.x, Node.js, Spring Boot, and WildFly Swarm. In addition, OpenShift Application Runtimes includes the Launch Service, which helps developers get up and running quickly in the cloud through a number of ready-to-run examples — or missions — that streamline developer productivity.

New Cache Booster with JBoss Data Grid integration

In our latest continuous delivery release, we have added a new cache mission  that demonstrates how to use a cache to increase the response time of applications.  This mission shows you how to:

  1. Deploy a cache to OpenShift.
  2. Use a cache within an application.

The common use case for this booster is to cache service result sets to decrease latency associated with data access as well as reduce workload on backend service.  Another very common use case is to reduce the data volume of message send across in distributed system.

Continue reading “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes: Delivering new productivity, performance, and stronger standards support with its latest sprint release”

Jakarta EE is officially out

Jakarta EE is officially out! OK, given the amount of publicity and evangelising we and others have done around EE4J and Jakarta EE over the past few months, you would be forgiven for thinking it was already the case, but it wasn’t … until today!

I cannot stress enough how important this is to our industry. The number of Java™ developers globally is estimated at over 14 million. The Java EE market is estimated at a high multi-billion dollar value to the industry. Yes, there are other languages out there and other frameworks but none of them have yet made the impact Java™ and Java EE has over the years. Of course, Java EE was not perfect for a variety of reasons, but if you consider how much of an impact it has had on the industry given known and debated limitations, just imagine how much it can bring in the years ahead if it were improved.

With the release of Jakarta EE, we all have a chance to collaborate and build on the good things it inherits, whilst at the same time working to evolve those pieces which are no longer relevant or perhaps never were quite what was needed. Working within the open processes of the Eclipse Foundation vendors, Java™ communities, individuals etc. are all able to interact as peers with no one vendor holding a higher role than another. We’ve seen this exact same process work extremely well in a relatively short period of time with Eclipse MicroProfile and I believe Jakarta EE can do at least as well.

When talking about Java EE and now Jakarta EE some often focus only on the technologies. Fortunately, those of us who have been in the open source world long enough appreciate that the community is just as important. With Jakarta EE, all of us involved in working towards the release hope that we can use it as a catalyst to bring together often disparate Java™ communities under a single banner. Too often, Java EE has been a divisive topic for some vendors and some communities, resulting in fractures and often working on the same problems but pulling in different directions. If Jakarta EE does only one thing, and that is bringing everyone together to collaborate, then I would still deem it a success!

I’ll finish by discussing why Red Hat® has been helping to lead this effort along with others. I can summarise this pretty easily: enterprise Java™ remains critical to our customers and communities, and we believe that despite the increase of other languages and frameworks, it should remain so for many years to come. Red Hat, and JBoss® before it, has contributed to J2EE™, Java EE, and Eclipse MicroProfile for years, and we believe that sharing our experiences and working on open source implementations is important for the industry as a whole, no matter what language you may be using. We believe it’s important to leverage Jakarta EE in the cloud and to a wider range of communities than in the past. We’re here to stay and will continue to help lead!

Onward!

To learn more, join these upcoming live sessions:

It’s Time To Accelerate Your Application Development With Red Hat JBoss Middleware And Microsoft Azure

The role of applications has changed dramatically.  In the past, applications were running businesses, but primarily relegated to the background.  They were critical, but more operational in the sense that they kept businesses running, more or less.  Today, organizations can use applications as a competitive advantage.  In fact, a well-developed, well-timed application can disrupt an entire industry.  Just take a look at the hotel, taxi, and movie rental industries respectively.

This can put more pressure on IT leaders.  Not only do they have to continue to run their daily business as efficiently as possible, but may also need to liberate resources to help drive innovation.  In other words, “do more with less.”  As a result, many are looking at ways to increase productivity and some are turning to modern development tools such as DevOps, containers, and microservices.  When making strategic decisions such as these, the technology, and infrastructure, should adapt to the needs of the business. Both now, and in the future.

When talking about infrastructure that can evolve as the business evolves, the answer is often the cloud.  However, when assessing application development technology that provides flexibility and enables IT leaders to better anticipate needs, it becomes a little more vague.  This is where Red Hat and Microsoft can come in.

Microsoft and  Red Hat have teamed up to offer Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) on Microsoft Azure.  JBoss EAP is a modern application server that is designed to provide a modular cloud-ready architecture, powerful management and automation, and developer productivity. It offers support and deployment flexibility for Java EE, whether on-premise, virtual, or hybrid cloud environments. In addition, JBoss EAP is designed to fulfill the demands of modern applications in the areas of process, infrastructure, and architecture by delivering support for DevOps, hybrid cloud, and microservices, respectively.

JBoss EAP is  the cornerstone of Red Hat’s focus on and commitment to enterprise application development, and serves as the foundation for Red Hat’s portfolio of cloud-ready middleware products.  A portfolio that includes technology business rules (BRMS) and business process management (BPMS) capabilities. Combined with Microsoft’s enterprise-grade cloud computing platform, collectively, these solutions can deliver a diverse, open, lightweight, enterprise capable application development platform.

SCSK Corporation is a Japanese system integrator that designs and implements Internet of Things (IoT) solutions. The company used Red Hat JBoss BRMS to develop its own IoT platform, which it offers on Microsoft Azure, that is designed to filter, store, analyze, and visualize data sent from devices and sensors. Organizations can analyze large volumes of IoT data to help make better  business decisions. This requires a more reliable, scalable, and robust platform.  When asked if JBoss BRMS was chosen because of its complex event processing (CEP) engine, Naoaki Kato, Engineer in the SCSK Middleware Unit responded: “Yes, but there was one more important factor: the fact that it is a Red Hat product. Red Hat products have a strong track record in the enterprise market, and Red Hat offers great support.”

I had the privilege of  discussing the partnership with numerous attendees at Microsoft Ignite 2017 and believe that the partnership has been well received.  To wrap with another quote from Naoaki Kato, SCSK: “The Microsoft–Red Hat partnership was really great news for the enterprise market.”

* The use of the word ‘partnership’ does not mean a legal partnership or any other form of legal relationship between Red Hat and Microsoft.

The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

1. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

Continue reading “The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know”

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Beta Availability

The beta release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 (JBoss EAP) is now available. JBoss EAP is Red Hat’s middleware platform, built on open standards and compliant with the Java Enterprise Edition 7 specification. JBoss EAP supports a modular structure that provides service enabling only when required, improving startup speed. Included in this minor release are a broad set of updates to existing features. In addition, the beta release provides new functionality in the areas of security, management, HA, and performance, such as a new additional security framework that unifies security across the entire application server, CLI and web console enhancements, and load balancing profile, respectively. Also included are additions to capabilities related to the simplification of components such as a new additional EJB Client library, HTTP/2 support, and the ability to replace the JSF implementation. With these new capabilities, customers can continue to reduce maintenance time and effort, simplify security, and deliver applications faster and more frequently, all with improved efficiency.

Here are some highlights of the JBoss EAP 7.1 Beta release:

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Beta Availability”

3 ways to effectively prepare for process improvements in your digital journey

In our journey to transform our ways of working, our focus on our customers wishes and our plans to pivot to a digital business there is always a need for process improvement.

While the transformation to a digital business can encompass many aspects that are new to your organization, there are always existing investments in technologies and processes that need to be evaluated.

Some can be modernized and migrated on to the new infrastructure that will support the digital business and others end up remaining in place as legacy systems of record.

One thing is for sure, evaluating existing business processes and looking to improve their effectiveness is going to be a necessary step. With that in mind, here are three ways to effectively prepare for process improvements in your digital journey.

1. Effective BPM theory

The first step in any journey is to plan effectively and gather as much information from the experts as you can. For this step you have many options, but the following example previews the open technology and tooling that will ensure you are ready to tackle process improvements.

 

Schabell_JBoss_front1

2. Inventory existing processes

Identifying the list of existing processes in a business, both automated and non-automated processes will be the next step on the journey.

Businesses have processes in place that might be automated in some form, but showing signs of age or lack of effective execution. Others might have partial automation and exhibit a need for further automation at the time of evaluation. Finally, there can potentially be processes in your business that are crying out for automation and are hindering other processes with their lack of automation.

Collect all this information for evaluation without regard for size, level of automation or making decisions on priority for the next step.

3. Short list processes

Now that you’re able to browse all processes in your organization, identifying the short list where quick wins on process improvements is critical to the project’s success.
Everyone wants to see gains and building momentum with processes that can be improved both quickly and effectively builds confidence. Identify processes that have impact, are visible and can be effectively improved without having major impacts to the existing architecture or business process owner perceptions. This will be different for every organization, but crucial to building success and ensuring a smoother transition on your digital journey.
Armed with these three guidelines you’re ready to effectively prepare for process improvements in your digital journey.

Red Hat Summit 2017 – Planning your JBoss labs

This year in Boston, MA you can attend the Red Hat Summit 2017, the event to get your updates on open source technologies and meet with all the experts you follow throughout the year.

It’s taking place from May 2-4 and is full of interesting sessions, keynotes, and labs.

This year I was part of the process of selecting the labs you are going to experience at Red Hat Summit and wanted to share here some to help you plan your JBoss labs experience. These labs are for you to spend time with the experts who will teach you hands-on how to get the most out of your JBoss middleware products.

Each lab is a 2-hour session, so planning is essential to getting the most out of your days at Red Hat Summit.

As you might be struggling to find and plan your sessions together with some lab time, here is an overview of the labs you can find in the session catalog for exact room and times. Each entry includes the lab number, title, abstract, instructors and is linked to the session catalog entry:

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit 2017 – Planning your JBoss labs”