Red Hat makes Node.js a first-class citizen on OpenShift with RHOAR, by Conor O’Neill, nearForm

Red Hat’s offering in cloud-native application development has just taken another step forward with the announcement of supported Node.js. Conor O’Neill from our partner nearForm shares his thoughts on the role that Node.js and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) will take in Red Hat’s market leadership in Cloud-Native application development, modernization and migration.

Read more here: Red Hat makes Node.js a first-class citizen on OpenShift with RHOAR, by Conor O’Neill, nearForm

Luis I. Cortes. Senior Manager, Middleware Partner Strategy – @licortes_redhat

Cloud Native Application Development – Adopt or Fail

In today’s digital world, software strategy is central to business strategy. To stay competitive, organizations need customized software applications to meet their unique needs — from customer engagements to new product and services development. Drawn-out development projects are no longer acceptable, given business demands. Therefore, the need to speed up application development, testing, delivery, and deployment is no longer optional but a must-have competency.   

At the same time that developers are confronting this challenge to deliver solutions more quickly, they are also facing the most diverse technology ecosystem in the history of computing.  To address this challenge, development teams must modernize architecture, infrastructure, and processes to deliver higher-quality applications with greater agility.

Cloud native development is an approach to building and running applications that fully exploits the advantages of the cloud computing model.  Cloud native development multidimensionality involves architecture, infrastructure, and processes based upon four key tenets:

  1. Services-based architecture: could be microservices or any modular loosely coupled model for independent scalability and flexibility of maintenance and polyglot language runtimes.
  2. Containers and Docker image: as the deployment unit and self-contained execution environment with consistency and portability across cloud infrastructures.
  3. DevOps automation: implementing processes and practices and instrumentation of development to test deployment of applications.     
  4. API-based design: The only communication allowed is via service interface calls over the network. No direct linking, no direct reads of another team’s data store, no shared-memory model with an outside- in perspective.

Continue reading “Cloud Native Application Development – Adopt or Fail”

A DevOps approach to decision management

Sometimes we would like to change the behavior of an application fast. I mean, really fast.

Traditional development cycles for enterprise applications take weeks if not months for a new version to be ready in production. Even in the world of DevOps, containers, and microservices, where we can spin up new versions of an app in days, or even hours, we need to go through development cycles that are too far away from the business users.

Welcome to the world of business rules and decision services, along with low code development.

Continue reading “A DevOps approach to decision management”

“Micro-rules,” event-driven apps, and Red Hat Decision Manager

As we described in an earlier blog, microservices are mini-applications which are devoted to a single, specific function. They are discrete (independent of other services in the architecture), polyglot with a common messaging or API interface, and they have well-defined parameters.

As application development and IT operations teams have started streamlining and speeding up their processes with methodologies like Agile and DevOps, they have increasingly begun treating IT applications as microservices. This breaks up potential bottlenecks, reduces dependencies on services used by other teams, and can help make IT infrastructure less rigid and more distributed.

One area where we are seeing this looser, more distributed approach to service development is with business rules.

“Micro-rules”

Business rules and processes in a traditional structure tend to be centralized, with the complete set of functionality defined for all workflows. The problem with centralization is because there is a single, centralized collection of business rules, any changes to one set of rules can affect many other sets, even those for different business functions.

Micro-rules essentially treat each functional set of rules as its own service — well-defined, highly focused, and independent of other rules.

Figure – Function rule sets as micro-rules

Continue reading ““Micro-rules,” event-driven apps, and Red Hat Decision Manager”

The Business Value of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform – latest white paper by IDC

The latest edition of the white paper titled “The Business Value of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform,” which summarizes the benefits and value that Red Hat customers are seeing by moving to JBoss EAP, has been released.

As the paper states, “IDC interviewed organizations that are using JBoss EAP to develop and run various business applications. These study participants explained that they not only have significantly reduced platform costs with JBoss EAP but also are supporting important organizational IT initiatives such as containerization, microservices, and hybrid cloud use.” The interviewed participants varied in size from medium to large organizations and belonged to a set of diverse vertical industries.

Some of the results from this study are:

  • 481% 3-year ROI
  • 8-month payback period
  • $50K USD average annual benefits per 100 users
  • 43% more number of new application released per year
  • 21% faster time to deliver new applications
  • 38% more number of new features released per year
  • 74% less productive hours lost due to unplanned downtime per year

Continue reading “The Business Value of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform – latest white paper by IDC”

The 3 benefits of RHOAR, by Thomas Johnson, Shadow-Soft

The rise of microservices and containerized environments comes with its own set of demands and challenges for developers, who are being asked to quickly and reliably bring new features to market and adhere to strict best practices.

Thomas Johnston from our partner Shadow-Soft recognizes their pain points and offers the three benefits that RHOAR offers to speed up microservices development.

Read more here: Microservices slowing you down? Streamline the orchestration process with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR)

Red Hat JBoss EAP – a platform for current and future workloads

There is this myth that Java EE containers aren’t fast and agile enough to build modern applications. Although this may be true for some app server vendors, it’s definitely not the case for Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP).  JBoss EAP is a modern application platform that includes a modular structure that allows service enabling only when required, improving startup speed.

With this in mind, we decided to run a comparison between JBoss EAP and other technologies that are touted to be the best for cloud-native applications. Not to our surprise, here are the results:

Note: The performance tests above were produced without any performance optimization, and if you run the tests yourself, you might get different results depending on your hardware and memory. The conclusion from the above results is that JBoss EAP is not slower and does not use more memory than the other runtimes.

When comparing a JBoss EAP instance running Java EE Web Profile app, a JBoss EAP running a Spring application, Tomcat and Spring Boot, you can see that in our tests, JBoss EAP running Java EE Web Profile was faster, used less memory, and had the highest throughput under load. You can find the entire test suite and source code at the following location:

https://github.com/tqvarnst/eap-vs-tomcat-vs-spring-boot

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss EAP – a platform for current and future workloads”

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Availability

The release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 (JBoss EAP) is now available. JBoss EAP is Red Hat’s middleware platform, built on open standards and compliant with the Java Enterprise Edition 7 specification, which includes a modular structure that provides service enabling only when required, improving startup speed, memory footprint and performance. Included in this minor release are a broad set of updates to existing features. In addition, the release provides new functionality in the areas of security, management, HA, and performance, such as a new additional security framework that unifies security across the entire application server, CLI and web console enhancements, and load balancing profile, respectively. Also included are additions to capabilities related to the simplification of components such as a new additional EJB Client library, HTTP/2 Support and the ability to replace the JSF implementation as well as the JBoss Server Migration Tool to migrate from previous versions of JBoss EAP to JBoss EAP 7.1. With these new capabilities, customers can continue to reduce maintenance time and effort, simplify security, and deliver applications faster and more frequently, all with improved efficiency.

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Availability”

The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

1. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

Continue reading “The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know”

Red Hat partners guide your journey to cloud-native development

The big question is always, “Do we car manufacturers learn to become tech companies more quickly than a tech company learns to be an automotive player?”

That is quite a statement. When a leading car manufacturer worries about being disrupted by a technology company, you know something big is going on. No wonder so many companies are talking about disruption these days.

There is a big transition taking place. And it is not just about competition. Or innovation. Or value migration. Or the creation of new markets. It is about the fact that every company is becoming a technology company, and only those that embrace this will survive, thrive, and shape our world. Software is at the core of this change, and increasingly it appears that the cloud is where much of this is going to take place.

Customers often come to us asking, “How can I be faster? How can I innovate and lead, instead of repeat and follow? How can I do that with enterprise-grade security, reliability and resiliency?”

A good part of the answer lies in using the cloud to power business models and help run, migrate, or scale existing applications, or develop new cloud-native ones. Red Hat has offered platforms to run customers’ applications and infrastructure in the cloud for a number of years. Today, we are taking another step forward by offering cloud-native application runtimes and frameworks, fully supported and enterprise grade.

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes offers a curated selection of popular cloud-native application runtimes and frameworks that are well-suited for enabling cloud-native application development.

In the words of Joe Dickman, senior vice president of Vizuri, “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes establishes a foundation for building services for hybrid and multi-cloud application and systems […] in a myriad of environments using their preferred tools.”

With Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, organizations can innovate directly in the cloud, from inception to production; running in the industry’s most comprehensive Kubernetes platform, Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, and in a cloud provider of choice.

James Chinn, CEO at Shadow-Soft, adds: “With Red Hat’s latest support of Wildfly Swarm, Spring Boot, and NodeJS, our customers can feel confident building and scaling containerized workloads on OpenShift. Openshift deployed in a public cloud gives our customers the flexibility and agility to deploy an enterprise and container framework quickly and easily.”

When customers develop an application strategy for moving to the cloud, they have to choose the right runtimes, based on factors such as existing skills or the right framework for the application they need to create.

“Historically, one of the biggest challenges has been the roadmap necessary for change in legacy environments,” says Chris Hart, chief technology officer of Levvel. “OpenShift Application Runtimes helps simplify that transformation and lowers the effort and risks to getting started with cloud-native development.”

They need to decide which applications to move to the cloud and how to keep evolving and innovating. What applications get a lift-and-shift (rehost) versus reshape or re-architect? Should they create “fast monoliths” or decompose them, totally, or partially, as microservices? If so, what is the right framework for the job?

Erik Melander, EVP of solutions at Kovarus, expands on this: “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes […] reduces friction by packaging and supporting a curated set of open application runtimes and letting developers make the right choice for cloud-native development.”

It is also important for them to learn about containers and how to implement DevOps methodologies and culture. Development and operations teams may need to learn new skills and change the way they work.

We are happy to have a large network of partners around the world with the expertise to support our customers along the exciting path of going to the cloud. From the top level strategy and innovation consulting, down to the most detailed testing and infrastructure set up. From defining and helping implement an application modernization strategy, to helping implement and deploy a microservices architecture.

Red Hat solution systems integrators and solution providers can help select the right option based on the technical objectives, existing skills or strategy. They can also help customers prepare for the challenges of complex microservices architectures and equip an organization to adopt DevOps practices and culture.

Start your journey here!

Supporting quotes:

“For our customers that are developing applications to create and sustain competitive advantage, developer productivity is an ever-present challenge. We are excited to see Red Hat addressing this problem with the launch of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, which reduces friction by packaging and supporting a curated set of open application runtimes and letting developers make the right choice for cloud-native development.”
Erik Melander, EVP of Solutions at Kovarus

“We’re excited about Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes because it simplifies the adoption of beneficial technologies for our enterprise customers. Many companies know they need to achieve higher release velocity and improved reliability using approaches like microservices architecture and more modern development and operations tools. Historically, one of the biggest challenges has been the roadmap necessary for change in legacy environments. The OpenShift Application Runtimes help simplify that transformation and lowers the effort and risks to getting started with cloud-native development. We’re looking forward to seeing this accelerate our customers’ success.”
Chris Hart, Chief Technology Officer, Levvel

“We are excited about the announcement of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes as it signals Red Hat’s continual commitment to meeting our customers where they are today and positioning them for success in the future. With Red Hat’s latest support of Wildfly Swarm, Spring Boot and NodeJS, our customers can feel confident building and scaling containerized workloads on OpenShift. Openshift deployed in a public cloud gives our customers the flexibility and agility to deploy an enterprise and container framework quickly and easily. And like any public cloud deployment, you can start small and scale elastically as workloads demand.”
James Chinn, CEO, Shadow-Soft

“Organizations that are investing time and resources in cloud-native architectures must look at leveraging containerized workloads to provide a robust, flexible and reliable infrastructure that can respond quickly to changing customer needs. Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes establishes a foundation for building services for hybrid and multi-cloud application and systems in a programmable way that provision and decommission infrastructure and applications resources in a myriad of environments using their preferred tools.”
Joe Dickman, Senior Vice President, Vizuri