Protecting your APIs if account take over (ATO) or DDoS keep you up at night

Red Hat partner Imperva recently announced an expanded portfolio of security products targeting protection against account takeover (ATO) and attacks targeted at APIs, as well as a three-second SLA for DDoS attack protection.

These new services provide comprehensive protection against a wide range of cybersecurity threats targeting not just websites, but also business-critical APIs, legacy systems, and other applications.

Read Imperva’s blog where they highlight that while APIs play a critical role in accelerating innovation and business growth in the digital economy, they need to be protected from cybercriminals trying attacks like intrusion attempts.

Also, don’t miss their press release where our director of product management, Mark Cheshire, weighs in on how Imperva’s solutions complement Red Hat 3scale API Management for a better, safer experience.

 

Red Hat Integration Customers Showcase Their Accomplishments at 2019 Red Hat Summit

We just wrapped up Red Hat Summit and it was a great time! Thank you for those of you who were able to attend and we hope to see those who couldn’t in San Francisco next year!

Customers using Red Hat Integration capabilities were recognized and showcased their relationships with Red Hat. BP and Emirates NBD were honored as Red Hat Innovation Award winners for their technological achievements and demonstrated creative thinking, determined problem-solving and transformative uses of Red Hat technology. Ally Financial and Banco Galicia received honorable mentions for the Innovation Awards as well. In addition to the Innovation Award winners and honorable mentions, multiple Red Hat Integration customers spoke about their respective paths to success. These customers included the Government of Canada, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) Bank, Spark New Zealand, Deutsche Telekom IT and Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT).

BP was selected as an Innovation Award winner for modernizing their complex technology infrastructure by building a self-service platform and a DevOps culture. BP utilized Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, and other Red Hat technologies, to build their Application Engineering Services’ Digital Conveyor. The Digital Conveyor empowers product delivery teams with self-service capabilities, a DevOps approach and a continuous integration/continuous delivery pipeline.

Emirates NBD was named an Innovation Award winner for its implementation of a cloud-native platform and agile methods to offer customers personalized, always-on digital banking. Emirates NBD established their own scalable private cloud platform, Sahab (White Cloud), with the flexibility to accommodate a future hybrid cloud model. Emirates NBD built Sahab on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and employs other Red Hat technologies like Red Hat 3scale API Management, Red Hat Fuse and Red Hat AMQ. With the new platform, Emirates NBD is able to manage over 500 APIs and is able to more easily integrate and collaborate with third parties including FinTechs, government institutions and technology partners.

Ally Financial was recognized as an Innovation Award honorable mention for creating a containerized hybrid cloud platform to support cloud-native application development and adopting DevOps practices to increase collaboration, innovation and efficiency. Ally Financial needed to be able to develop and deploy releases faster and with greater reliability to satisfy their customers’ needs for speed and efficiency. Ally Financial used a range of Red Hat technologies and services including Red Hat Fuse, Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat OpenShift Application Services and Red Hat Consulting to develop the new platform and adopt practices to improve time-to-market, increase agility and strengthen its competitive advantage.

Banco Galicia was chosen as an Innovation Award honorable mention for streamlining its digital services by migrating its channels and back-end systems to a unified, cloud-native, omnichannel platform. This platform supports collaborative agile development, provides cross-environment workloads and offers more secure integration with existing banking systems. Banco Galicia has taken advantage of Red Hat Integration products including Red Hat 3scale API Management, Red Hat Fuse,  Red Hat AMQ and Red Hat Data Grid to simplify digital services. This simplification has produced an improvement in customer experience while seeing a decrease in application downtime and estimating a decrease in development costs.

The Government of Canada examined overcoming API challenges by building a central API hub for government departments to publish and monitor their APIs using Red Hat 3scale API Management and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

CIBC Bank described how they built an optimal architecture for open banking by using service mesh and API gateways. They also laid out how to balance creativity and standardization while building a culture focused on speed and innovation.

Spark New Zealand discussed how they navigated a company-wide journey of agile transformation and migrating from a legacy, proprietary integration platform to a container-based, open source, agile integration solution utilizing Red Hat AMQ, Red Hat Fuse and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

Deutsche Telekom IT spoke about harnessing agile integration to empower internal development teams to deliver services faster in a consistent and standardized way by building a next-generation integration platform using Red Hat Fuse and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

SWIFT chronicled how they integrated customers’ back office functions with SWIFT functions to help ease customer pain points. SWIFT chose Red Hat Fuse, Red Hat AMQ and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform to be embedded in the main messaging client application which hundreds of financial institutions use to exchange millions of financial messages each day across the SWIFT network.

This is just a small sample of the successes customers across industries are having with Red Hat Integration. Agile integration and the application environment are having profound impacts on institutions around the world. We at Red Hat are standing by to help you make the next (or first) step in your digital transformation.

Learn more:

An Application Environment Powered by Integration

We have been doing application and data integration for 20+ years. Why? Siloed applications and data need to be connected to synchronize data between applications, complete and automate business processes and improve efficiencies. Technologies like the enterprise service bus (ESB), managed file transfer (MFT), message brokers, integration platform as a service (iPaaS) have been used to solve integration requirements. Today as organizations pursue competitive advantage and differentiation through software and adopt digital services, integration has become a strategic capability. Integration is pervasive and critical for digital business as it connects new applications, existing applications, data and devices to create innovative, differentiated solutions. Evolving customer engagement models, new customer experiences, and competitive service delivery models are powered by integration.

Integration in application environment

Key transformations in technology, software architecture and software delivery have elevated  the role and importance of integration in application development and to the rearchitecting of the old monolithic integration solutions into a set of middleware services that developers can easily incorporate into applications. In the era of digital services, applications are distributed, spanning infrastructures and cloud environments. Application creators need to create quickly and frequently iterate. They need tools and application infrastructure that enables them with this increased agility. The success (or failure) of a new service or application depends on its ability to communicate with other services, across any infrastructure, in scalable secure ways. Application components must be composable, must be deployable across cloud and hybrid environments and must interoperate to deliver value. Applications must be able to connect to existing data, new SaaS apps, custom apps, IoT data and more. Integration is essential to realizing these architectures. This world is your application environment.  The context of systems, services, applications, infrastructures, clouds where your software innovation happens. Integration has become a central part and key enabler of application creation. A first-order consideration in building solutions.

Cloud-native integration

As application developers adopt microservices style architectures and DevOps practices to create rapid, incremental innovations, container-based infrastructure is key to deliver these services. Cloud-native applications take full advantage of the container platform to create scalable, resilient and iterative services. An application environment requires a common set of standards, practices, capabilities that are “engineered together” to develop, test and deploy cloud-native applications. In a robust application environment, cloud-native integration capabilities, are container-based, API-centric, distributable, and composable as microservices. Application developers can easily include the integration capabilities as part of their toolsets and practices. This allows application developers, integration developers, and citizen integrators to all participate in delivering adaptive and innovative services.

Roughly two years ago we introduced the concept of agile integration which is based on 3 key capabilities distributed integration, APIs and containers.  The agile Integration technologies and architectural approach are foundational to realizing an application environment that meets the needs of modern software-driven organizations.

Learn More

What is an application environment? Check out this blog by Middleware VP and GM, Mike Piech.

 

Six typical integration challenges that agile integration can solve

Red Hat conceived the agile integration concept to help our customers tackle integration challenges more effectively. As we described in an earlier post in detail, agile integration is an architectural approach centered around application programming interfaces (APIs) and API management. At its core, this concept resides on the following three pillars: distributed integration for greater flexibility, containers for the ability to scale better, and managed APIs for re-usability and hence speed.

When we started designing this concept we actually started from two premises:

  1. Agility today is the most important business capability — especially for incumbents in traditional markets.
  2. Every organisation has integration problems.

Typically in most companies nowadays the integration function is centralized and hence technically as well as organizationally a bottleneck. Our two premises contradict each other and we set out to design an integration concept that can solve this contradiction.

In order to come up with a solution that really helps our customers solve their integration problems in the best possible way, we first analysed the market to understand what actually are the problems that users are trying to solve. Although there are of course a very wide variety of often very fine-nuanced problems, it turned out that we could classify all the problems into six typical integration challenges. The following diagram summarizes these challenges and we then discuss each of them in more detail.

Agile Integration: Six Challenges

Continue reading “Six typical integration challenges that agile integration can solve”

Meet application integration in the times of hybrid cloud

The concept of agile integration, depending on whom you ask, may appear as a contradiction in terms. Integration is a concept that used to be associated with “slow,” “monolithic,” “only to be touched by the expert team,” etc.. Big and complex legacy enterprise service buses connected to your applications were the technology of choice at a time when agility was not a requirement, when the cloud was barely an idea, when containers were associated with maritime shipping and not with application packaging and delivery.

Can the principles of agile development be combined with those of modern integration? Our response is yes, and we call it  agile integration. Let me show you what it is, why it is important, and what we at Red Hat are doing about it.

Software development methodologies have evolved rapidly in the last few years to incorporate innovative concepts that result in faster development cycles, agility to react to changes and immediate business value. Development now takes place in small teams, changes can be approved and incorporated fast to keep track of the changing demands of the business, and each iteration of the code has a product as the ultimate result. No more need for longer development cycles and never-ending approvals for changes. And importantly, business and technical users join forces and collaborate to optimize the end result.

In addition, modern integration requires agility, cloud-readiness, and support of modern integration approaches. In contrast with the legacy, monolithic ESBs, modern integration is lightweight, pattern-based, scalable, and able to manage complex, distributed environments. It has to be cloud-ready and support modern architectures and deployment models like containers. It also has to provide integration services with new, popular technologies, like API management, which is becoming the preferred way to integrate applications and is at the core of microservices architectures. And support innovative and fast evolving use cases such as the Internet of Things (IoT).

Continue reading “Meet application integration in the times of hybrid cloud”

Red Hat present at EclipseCon France 2018

EclipseCon France is taking place this week in Toulouse, France (June 13-14, 2018) and it’s offering a great lineup of top-notch sessions on nine different tracks, from IoT to cloud and modeling technologies. This year, there is even a dedicated track for “Microservices, MicroProfile, EE4J and Jakarta EE,” which is covering topics such as Istio, 12-factor apps, geoscience, machine learning, noSQL database integration, cloud-native application development, security, resilience, scalability, and the latest statuses of the Jakarta EE and MicroProfile open source specification projects. Under this track, we are hosting two sessions:

But we are also delivering other interesting sessions under the “Reactive Programming” track:

Under the “IoT” track:

Under the “Eclipse IDE and RCP in Practice” track:

And, under the “Cloud & DevOps” and “Other Cool Stuff” tracks:

For those of you that will be at the conference, we invite you to attend the sessions above and to stop by the Red Hat booth to learn how Red Hat can help your organization solve your IT challenges (and get your swag too!). And for those of you that would like to learn more about Red Hat offerings in relation to the topics above, please visit the following links:

Announcing: Red Hat Fuse 7 is now available

After several technical previews over the last few months, Red Hat Fuse is officially available. This is a significant release, both for Fuse itself and for integration platforms, because it represents a shift from more traditional, on-premise, centralized integration architecture to distributed, hybrid environment integration architecture.

Integration itself has historically been a bottleneck for infrastructure design and changes. The integration points were largely centralized and controlled by a central team in an attempt to manage dependencies and standardize data management between applications. However, that centralization also made change difficult, and it was governed more by procedure and bureaucracy than business innovation. As with traditional infrastructure architecture more generally, integration has not historically been an agile or adaptive architecture.

Red Hat Fuse (and related community projects) is the beginning of a departure from traditional, rigid integration platforms to more agile, distributed integration design. Fuse introduces three major features in the latest release:

  • Fuse Online, fully hosted Fuse applications and integrations. Fuse Online provides immediate access to the functionality of Fuse, without having to install and configure it on-premise. Developers can begin testing and customizing integrations immediately. Connectors can be uploaded to the online development area to allow even more integrations.
  • Fuse container images for Red Hat OpenShift. Fuse runs natively on OpenShift, allowing local, containerized integration points to be created in development teams and to be designed, tested, and updated within DevOps workflows as part of the overall application development cycle.
  • A drag-and-drop UI for integration pattern design. While integration development is typically done within IT teams, integration design relies on business knowledge. Business managers and analysts need to be able to collaborate effectively with their development teams. The new Fuse Ignite UI (based on the Syndesis.io project) is a lowcode way to develop integration — business users can use design elements to create integration architectures and to work with their development teams, within the same tool set.

These three features allow more agile integration development. Fuse installations can span online, on-premise, or container based environments without reducing functionality. This allows an integration platform that crosses environments, and be as lightweight and decentralized as an individual development team or an enterprise-wide platform. The lowcode UI allows business users to be brought directly into the application development cycle, enabling business logic to be incorporated into the integration application design from the beginning.

Additionally, Fuse 7 contains these new features:

  • Support for Spring Boot deployment for Fuse applications
  • 50 new application connectors (with a total of over 200 included connectors)
  • A new monitoring subsystem
  • Updated component versions, including new versions of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform and Apache Camel
  • A new name (Red Hat Fuse, rather than Red Hat JBoss Fuse)

 

Additional Resources

Taking Control of your IoT APIs

At its core, IoT is all about data: data from devices, commands to devices, integrating IoT data with other data to gain insights. The data sources include devices, enterprise applications, vendor/partner systems, service providers and customers. The point-to-point integration between these various systems is not feasible; hence, APIs become the primary means of communication between these disparate systems. A clean architectural approach is the one suggested by the agile integration concept. APIs are central to this concept, which allow data to be shared securely between internal and external systems. The opening of APIs enables a company to provide uniform data and transaction interfaces to internal and external developers, partners, and customers, for improved data access and control of remote resources. By providing well-defined APIs, developers can use data in a programmatic manner; e.g., app developers can get access to IoT devices data without worrying about the underlying hardware interfaces. Considering the importance of APIs for IoT, it’s imperative for an organization to manage these APIs effectively. In fact, APIs have been called a fundamental enabler of IoT however, without an effective API Management solution, API sprawl can easily lead to catastrophe.

Continue reading “Taking Control of your IoT APIs”

The Role of Agile Integration in Open Banking

In the mid 90s, Bill Gates famously said that “banking is necessary, banks are not.” There is certainly a lot of truth in this statement. We all need banking services in some shape or form. But who delivers these services to us is secondary. In fact, Accenture concluded in a study conducted in 2016 asking over 30,000 people in 18 countries that if the tech titans like Google, Amazon, or Facebook would offer such services, 31% of the respondents would switch to them. This clearly imposes a significant threat on traditional banking institutions.

Another challenge that banks are facing worldwide are the increasing demands for regulatory compliance with respect to openness. Such regulations include, for instance, Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2) in Europe, the Amendment Bill to Japanese Banking Law in Japan, the National Payments Corporation of India (NPCI) with the Unified Payment Interface, UK’s Open Banking standard by the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), or the Open Banking Regime by Australia’s Federal Government. Banks approach these regulatory challenges in many different ways. Some see it as a serious business threat and only do the bare minimum for compliance; others see it as an opportunity and with smart investment start building banking platforms for the future.

Our suggestion for building the banking platform of the future resides on the principles of agile integration, which is an architectural approach centered around application programming interfaces (APIs) and API management. At its core, agile integration resides on the three pillars: distributed integration for greater flexibility, containers for the ability to scale better, and managed APIs for re-usability and hence speed. We described the details in an earlier post.  

Continue reading “The Role of Agile Integration in Open Banking”

How to Address the Challenges of a Pervasive Integration Strategy

Earlier this months at the Gartner ITxpo event, Massimo Pezzini presented the challenges that must be addressed by a pervasive enterprise integration strategy. In summary there are four types of hybrid challenges (see Massimo’s diagram below).

Gartner-HiP

Continue reading “How to Address the Challenges of a Pervasive Integration Strategy”