Decision Model & Notation – A new approach to business rules

Business rule engines (BRE) have been around for a long time. Introduced in the early 1990s, BREs have found application in many industries, particularly those that are heavily regulated where compliance and auditability are key concerns. A BRE enables complex rules and regulations to be encoded in a rule language, some of which bear a passing resemblance to English. The BRE can then evaluate the rules against enterprise data to ensure that the business transactions, etc. that the enterprise is performing comply with those rules. Today one of the most popular rule engines is Drools, an open source engine sponsored by Red Hat with a powerful rule language, called DRL, and a highly efficient algorithm that can scale to support hundreds of thousands of rules and terabytes of data.

Rule engines are a great idea. It’s much easier to simply specify all the rules that should apply to a particular transaction than it is to write a program in a traditional language like Java to verify compliance. And it’s much easier to change the rules in a BRE when needed than to modify and test a traditional application. Today’s focus on digital transformation is finding ever wider applications for BREs, from cleansing big data, to fraud detection to identifying patterns in event streams from the Internet of Things.

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Digital Automation Platforms: Injecting speed into application development

Red Hat has just published a new study by Carl Lehmann of the 451 Group, “Intelligent Process Automation and the Emergence of Digital Automation Platforms,” that examines the increasing importance of business automation technologies in modern business, and the ways that converged solutions (digital automation platforms) are bringing value to organizations engaged in digital transformation projects.

Carl writes that competitive advantage is enabled when an organization either does the same things as its rivals, but differently, or it does different things that are acknowledged as superior by customers. In today’s competitive markets, businesses are turning to next-generation digital automation platforms (DAP) to enable greater automation of key business functions and greater flexibility in responding to their customers’ needs.

A DAP is a set of tools and resources structured within a uniform framework to enable developers to rapidly design, prototype, develop, deploy, manage, and monitor process-oriented applications – from simple task-related workflows to dynamic unstructured collaborative activity streams and even highly structured cross-functional enterprise applications. To do so, DAPs are equipped with a range of new capabilities that go beyond those of their BPM and application development predecessors.

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