Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Availability

The release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 (JBoss EAP) is now available. JBoss EAP is Red Hat’s middleware platform, built on open standards and compliant with the Java Enterprise Edition 7 specification, which includes a modular structure that provides service enabling only when required, improving startup speed, memory footprint and performance. Included in this minor release are a broad set of updates to existing features. In addition, the release provides new functionality in the areas of security, management, HA, and performance, such as a new additional security framework that unifies security across the entire application server, CLI and web console enhancements, and load balancing profile, respectively. Also included are additions to capabilities related to the simplification of components such as a new additional EJB Client library, HTTP/2 Support and the ability to replace the JSF implementation as well as the JBoss Server Migration Tool to migrate from previous versions of JBoss EAP to JBoss EAP 7.1. With these new capabilities, customers can continue to reduce maintenance time and effort, simplify security, and deliver applications faster and more frequently, all with improved efficiency.

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The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

1. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

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Eclipse MicroProfile 1.2 is Now Available

Eclipse MicroProfile, an open forum to collaborate on enterprise Java™ microservices, today announced the release of Eclipse MicroProfile 1.2.

Eclipse MicroProfile 1.2, which builds on the 1.1 version, updates the config API and adds the health check, fault tolerance, metrics, and JWT propagation APIs.

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Swagger/OpenAPI for Enterprise Java microservices

On June 13, 2017, SmartBear joined the Eclipse MicroProfile project, an open source community specification for Enterprise Java microservices.  As someone interested in microservices, why is this news important?

Microservices and microservice architectures have been in vogue now for a couple of years and IT organizations are rushing to implement (or re-factor) their applications using these new ways of architecting and developing solutions because they are digital transformation enablers (together with CI/CD and containers, among others) that allow them to deliver solutions to the business at faster speeds than ever before. In addition, Java is still ranked as #1 or #2 in programming language use and Enterprise Java, in the form of Java EE specification and implementation, has been used to implement enterprise-grade applications for many years by developers, who can now apply their vast Enterprise Java experience to the implementation of microservices.  The Eclipse MicroProfile open source project fulfills the need in the market for a specification for microservices for Enterprise Java that can mature and evolve commensurately with digital business requirements. Eclipse MicroProfile, as a specification for Enterprise Java microservices, leverages some of Java EE, such as CDI, JAX-RS, JSON-P (no need to recreate the wheel), and adds new APIs1 (config, fault tolerance, security, health check, metrics, etc.) for a complete specification to implement enterprise-grade microservices in Java.

As microservices are leveraged across business applications, consumed across organizational/departmental boundaries, or offered for external consumption (outside the firewall), their management can become unwieldy. Microservices enabling technologies, such as Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, provide an integrated registry (OpenShift Container Platform can integrate with external registries as well) that ameliorates this situation.  Another management option for microservices is an API management solution. The only entry/exit point in/out of a microservice is its API and an API management solution can manage APIs by applying policies (security, management, throttling, load balancing, etc.) to them, keeping track of them in an internal catalog and giving insight into their usage.  This is why there is a strong synergy between API Management and microservices.

SmartBear Software, the company behind the popular Swagger/OpenAPI framework for defining and creating RESTful APIs, has a long history open source API testing and development tools. There are many REST API description languages in the market, such as RAML, WADL, API Blueprint, WSDL 2.0, but Swagger/OpenAPI is widely recognized as the most popular open source framework for defining and creating RESTful APIs and has become the market de-facto standard, which means that any successful API-related solution must be either based in or provide support via translation to Swagger. As an example, a very successful API management solution is Red Hat 3scale, which supports Swagger/OpenAPI.

The success of any new technology hinges a lot on the ecosystem that surrounds it (or that it is part of).  If it is diverse and rich in options then the technology will thrive and adoption will follow. By definition, microservices and microservices architecture encompass a large ecosystem of programming languages (they are language and technology agnostic, in fact), such as Java, Java EE, Go, PHP, Python, and platforms, such as Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). However, a variety of microservices-enabling open source technologies have also come about in recent years, like WildFly Swarm, Vert.x, Node.js, OpenAPI, MicroProfile, Istio. So, the microservices ecosystem is growing and will continue to grow as businesses continue their digital transformation.

As mentioned above, there is a strong synergy and relationship between API management and microservices and SmartBear joining MicroProfile is bringing OpenAPI, the most popular REST API description language, into the MicroProfile ecosystem.

For more information on JBoss EAP, please see: https://developers.redhat.com/products/eap/download

For more information on RHOAR, please see: https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2017/07/06/openshift-application-runtimes

For more information on Red Hat 3scale, please see:

https://www.redhat.com/en/technologies/jboss-middleware/3scale/get-started

1 – New APIs are currently Work-In-Process or part of Eclipse MicroProfile roadmap

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Beta Availability

The beta release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 (JBoss EAP) is now available. JBoss EAP is Red Hat’s middleware platform, built on open standards and compliant with the Java Enterprise Edition 7 specification. JBoss EAP supports a modular structure that provides service enabling only when required, improving startup speed. Included in this minor release are a broad set of updates to existing features. In addition, the beta release provides new functionality in the areas of security, management, HA, and performance, such as a new additional security framework that unifies security across the entire application server, CLI and web console enhancements, and load balancing profile, respectively. Also included are additions to capabilities related to the simplification of components such as a new additional EJB Client library, HTTP/2 support, and the ability to replace the JSF implementation. With these new capabilities, customers can continue to reduce maintenance time and effort, simplify security, and deliver applications faster and more frequently, all with improved efficiency.

Here are some highlights of the JBoss EAP 7.1 Beta release:

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Eclipse MicroProfile continues its growth in the market

Organizations that have already embarked or are thinking about starting a digital transformation journey are assessing and looking for ways to leverage their Java EE expertise. IT development and operations have built Java expertise over years, and there is a challenge to balance their existing skill base with new digitally transformative technologies, such as microservices, APIs, container-based architectures, and reactive programming. Eclipse MicroProfile is an open source project and one of those digitally transformative technologies that enables and optimizes the development of microservices — using familiar Java EE technologies and APIs.

You can think of MicroProfile as minimal standard profile for Java microservices. As with Java EE, MicroProfile implementations across different vendors are fully interoperable.

MicroProfile is supported in WildFly Swarm on the recently announced Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, our polyglot runtime platform powered by OpenShift, Kubernetes, and OpenStack. This delivers on the goal of simplifying the inherent complexity of developing cloud native applications.

There are a lot of reasons to begin adopting MicroProfile:

  • Open source, of course
  • Agility in developing microservices
  • Ability to leverage innovation
  • Architectural interoperability across different vendor offerings
  • No vendor lock-in
  • Fast learning curve for Java EE users (Java EE users can leverage their knowledge when using MicroProfile)
  • Ability to run on Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes 

Since MicroProfile was announced in June 2016, a lot has happened.  MicroProfile v 1.0 was released on September 19, 2016. Its implementation interoperability was demonstrated on November 2016 at Devoxx, where Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, and Payara demoed a unified web application with underlying microservices which had been developed separately by each vendor using MicroProfile. In addition, MicroProfile became part of the Eclipse Foundation as an incubation project back in December 14, 2016. New members have joined MicroProfile, such as SOUJava, Hazelcast, Fujitsu, Hammock, and kumuluzEE (the complete list of members can be found here).

Future releases of MicroProfile will build upon the existing foundation with organic growth by adding configuration, security, health check, and fault tolerance APIs, as well as adding support for later versions of CDI, JAX-RS, and JSON-P. The MicroProfile open source project plans to put out releases on an agile schedule and based on feedback from the open source community, which is accessible to everyone. Join the conversation and check out the MicroProfile site.