An Application Environment Powered by Integration

We have been doing application and data integration for 20+ years. Why? Siloed applications and data need to be connected to synchronize data between applications, complete and automate business processes and improve efficiencies. Technologies like the enterprise service bus (ESB), managed file transfer (MFT), message brokers, integration platform as a service (iPaaS) have been used to solve integration requirements. Today as organizations pursue competitive advantage and differentiation through software and adopt digital services, integration has become a strategic capability. Integration is pervasive and critical for digital business as it connects new applications, existing applications, data and devices to create innovative, differentiated solutions. Evolving customer engagement models, new customer experiences, and competitive service delivery models are powered by integration.

Integration in application environment

Key transformations in technology, software architecture and software delivery have elevated  the role and importance of integration in application development and to the rearchitecting of the old monolithic integration solutions into a set of middleware services that developers can easily incorporate into applications. In the era of digital services, applications are distributed, spanning infrastructures and cloud environments. Application creators need to create quickly and frequently iterate. They need tools and application infrastructure that enables them with this increased agility. The success (or failure) of a new service or application depends on its ability to communicate with other services, across any infrastructure, in scalable secure ways. Application components must be composable, must be deployable across cloud and hybrid environments and must interoperate to deliver value. Applications must be able to connect to existing data, new SaaS apps, custom apps, IoT data and more. Integration is essential to realizing these architectures. This world is your application environment.  The context of systems, services, applications, infrastructures, clouds where your software innovation happens. Integration has become a central part and key enabler of application creation. A first-order consideration in building solutions.

Cloud-native integration

As application developers adopt microservices style architectures and DevOps practices to create rapid, incremental innovations, container-based infrastructure is key to deliver these services. Cloud-native applications take full advantage of the container platform to create scalable, resilient and iterative services. An application environment requires a common set of standards, practices, capabilities that are “engineered together” to develop, test and deploy cloud-native applications. In a robust application environment, cloud-native integration capabilities, are container-based, API-centric, distributable, and composable as microservices. Application developers can easily include the integration capabilities as part of their toolsets and practices. This allows application developers, integration developers, and citizen integrators to all participate in delivering adaptive and innovative services.

Roughly two years ago we introduced the concept of agile integration which is based on 3 key capabilities distributed integration, APIs and containers.  The agile Integration technologies and architectural approach are foundational to realizing an application environment that meets the needs of modern software-driven organizations.

Learn More

What is an application environment? Check out this blog by Middleware VP and GM, Mike Piech.

 

Business Process Management Reimagined – New Services for Application Developers

You may be familiar with Business Process Management (BPM).  It is a discipline in which people use various methods to discover, model, analyze, measure, improve, optimize, and automate business processes. Today BPM, or more specifically the technology that supports BPM, is widely used in organizations large and small to automate business operations. The story of BPM is long, with roots going back to the early 1990’s, and it has constantly reinvented itself to meet the evolving needs of enterprises.  Once focused on driving efficiencies into back-office functions, BPM platforms have evolved into essential tools for enterprises looking to digitally transform operations, and to deliver a personalized customer experience that’s integrated across points of interaction.  

BPM in the Application Environment

The focus on digital transformation has led to the modern role of BPM solutions in application development, and to the rearchitecting of the old monolithic BPMS as a set of middleware services that developers can easily incorporate into applications.  Now often referred to as a Digital Application Platform (DAP), the BPMS has become part of the application environment – a catalog of components that can be included in applications requiring process management, decision management or optimization capabilities.  Now, for example, when building an application that requires, say, to make a determination of whether an insurance application complies with underwriting rules, a developer can quickly locate the corresponding decision service within their app environment and include it in their application.  Conversely, it’s the new DAP solutions that enable such application services to be quickly created from models provided by the business. Business friendly tools support the creation of a range of model types – from decision models, built with the new graphical Decision Model & Notation (DMN) standard, to models of entire business processes constructed in Business Process Model & Notation (BPMN).  DAP technology today is truly making it possible for business users to contribute to application development alongside developers.

Cloud-Native Digital Automation

The advantages of modern digital automation middleware are not limited to application development, however.  Once built, those new applications must be deployed on a variety of cloud platforms, they must scale automatically to meet varying demands, they must be secure, and they must be easy to replace or upgrade without impacting the user experience.  At Red Hat, the application environment, in which DAP services are included, is designed from the ground up to be cloud-native. DAP services are deployed in containers, and managed by Kubernetes, to provide the scalability and resiliency that enterprises need.

Digital automation today is an essential part of modern applications, and its importance is only likely to increase as we look to the future role of the Digital Automation Platform as the logical home for emerging technologies like Robotic Process Automation (RPA), and artificial intelligence / machine learning.  At Red Hat, we are focused on growing our application environment to support this widening technology landscape, so that our customers can succeed in an ever more digital world.

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.2 Availability

The release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.2 (JBoss EAP), Red Hat’s flagship middleware offering for enterprise Java, is now available.  Organizations around the globe trust and rely on JBoss EAP, a Java-EE compliant application server, to run their production workloads in on-premise, virtualized, containerized, and private, public, and hybrid cloud environments. With this release, Red Hat reaffirms its continued commitment to Java EE 8 as well as Jakarta EE, the new home for cloud-native Java, a community-driven specification under the Eclipse Foundation.

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.2 Availability”

Eclipse Glassfish 5.1 RC-1 Release

Today the first candidate release of the Eclipse Glassfish server targeting the new Jakarta EE 8 release is available. This was a huge effort to move the Glassfish source repositories over to the Eclipse github organization. It was accompanied by the move of TCK project as well. You can read about the details in Dmitry Kornilov’s blog here.

Red Hat’s Support of Jakarta EE

Red Hat is committed to supporting the evolution of enterprise Java at Eclipse and has been focusing on development of the Eclipse Jakarta EE specification process as well as helping with getting the migrated projects and TCK projects running under the eclipse CI infrastructure.

The new specification process is a replacement for the Java Community Process (JCP) used to develop the Java EE specification through Java EE 8. It provides a fully open source based process that includes specifications, APIs and TCKs. The Eclipse Jakarta EE specification process will be used to develop the next generation of the EE4J specifications. Mike Milinkovich has written about the current process draft status in detail here. The initial draft is in public review, so I recommend you take the opportunity to browse through it and make comments on the draft document provided in Mike’s blog post.

Red Hat at VoxxedDays Microservices

 

Microservices are no longer a playground and developers and architects have adopted them and re-architected applications to reap their benefits, while others have also deployed to production. Voxxed Days Microservices is an exciting place to share those experiences and also listen to what Red Hat has been doing in this space with Microprofile, Thorntail, SmallRye and more. As you might know, Voxxed Days Microservices 2018 will take place in Paris on the 29th October and Red Hat will be there together with the Eclipse Foundation. We also have an exciting line up of sessions and also a presence at the booth for any interesting conversations, questions and discussions on the topic.

 

Here is a list of sessions:

 

Session Title Date and Time (CET)   
Keynote: Distant past of Microservices Monday 09:15
Ask the Architects Monday 18:15
Data in a Microservices world: from conundrum to options Monday 14:30
Data Streaming for Microservices using Debezium Tuesday 14:30
Thorntail – A Micro Implementation of Eclipse MicroProfile Tuesday 11:15
What is SmallRye and how can you help? Tuesday 13:00

 

There will also be a full day hands-on workshop on Wednesday, October 31st for those interested in learning more about Microprofile.

 

Come by the Eclipse MicroProfile booth and pick up some swag!

 

For more information:

Voxxed Days Microservices conference program at-a-glance

The path to cloud-native applications: 8 steps

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Understanding cloud-native apps

Understanding middleware

Thorntail.io

MicroProfile.io

 

Insights about tuning an Apache Camel application deployed into Spring Boot

Introduction

Tuning is a very interesting topic in the field of Software Engineering. Everybody can agree that it’s important but I have  rarely seen people actually doing it. This can be especially true when people have spare computational resources to spend, or if they are following these mantras: “the load won’t reach at this point” or “let the cloud scale it.”

The goal of this post is to share some insights regarding tuning an Apache Camel application deployed into Spring Boot. This is not an ultimate guide for tuning and performance tests in Spring Boot applications, but more of an experience sharing during a tuning process.

When talking about tuning and performance tests, one thing that needs to be clear is the requirements, or what do you want to achieve by tuning an application. For example, one could say that with the computational resources they have, they aim for a 10% increase of requests the application can handle.

Continue reading “Insights about tuning an Apache Camel application deployed into Spring Boot”

MicroProfile/Thorntail presence by Red Hat at CodeOne 2018

This is Oracle’s first edition of their CodeOne (October 22-25) conference (née JavaOne), which expands to a variety of runtimes beyond Java, among other things. Red Hat will be present at the conference delivering workshops, keynotes, and sessions on a variety of topics.  As a leader in open source, Java, cloud, containers, microservices and cloud-native Java, Red Hat will host a series of talks on our implementation of MicroProfile using the open source project Thorntail. Here is a list of our MicroProfile-related sessions:

Date and Time (US PST)                                                           Session Title
10/23/2018 20:30:00 @ Moscone West – Room 2018 Eclipse MicroProfile: What’s Next?
10/22/2018 12:30:00 @ Moscone West – Room 2018 Cloud Native Java EE with MicroProfile
10/25/2018 11:00:00 @ Moscone West – Room 2011 Thorntail: A Micro Implementation of Eclipse MicroProfile
10/22/2018 13:30:00 @ Moscone West – Room 2008 Building a Fault-Tolerant Microservice in an Hour
10/24/2018 16:00:00 @ Moscone West – Room 2018 CDI from Monolithic Applications to Java 11 jlink Images

 

There will also be other MicroProfile-related sessions delivered by members of the community.

Come and visit us at the Red Hat (booth #5401) and pick up your swag!

For more information:

Red Hat sessions at Oracle CodeOne 2018

The path to cloud native applications: 8 steps

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Understanding cloud-native apps

Understanding middleware

Thorntail.io

MicroProfile.io

 

MicroProfile/Thorntail presence by Red Hat at EclipseCon Europe 2018

EclipseCon Europe is fast approaching and many open source users, vendors, corporations, and developers will converge on October 23-25, 2018 in Ludwigsburg, Germany for the once-a-year event that brings the latest trends in IoT, web and cloud development, Java and Java development toolkits, tools and IDEs, and cloud-native Java. As a leader in open source, Java, cloud, containers, microservices, and cloud-native Java, Red Hat will be present with a series of talks  on our implementation of MicroProfile using the open source project Thorntail. Here is a list of our MicroProfile-related sessions:

Date and Time (CET)         Session Title
23 Oct 2018 – 15:15 Path to Cloud-native Application Development: 8 steps
24 Oct 2018 – 14:00 Thorntail – A Micro Implementation of Eclipse MicroProfile
24 Oct 2018 – 16:30 Distributed Tracing for MicroProfile Runtimes
25 Oct 2018 – 10:45 Cloud Native development with Eclipse MicroProfile on Kubernetes

 

There will also be other MicroProfile-related sessions delivered by members of the community.

Red Hat will also participate in the Community Day on Monday, October 22, 2018 with workshops, “meet the spec” talks and process and implementation discussions related to MicroProfile and Jakarta EE.

Come and visit us at the Red Hat booth (booth #1) and pick up your swag!

For more information:

Red Hat sessions at EclipseCon Europe 2018

The path to cloud native applications: 8 steps

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Understanding cloud-native apps

Understanding middleware

Thorntail.io

MicroProfile.io

 

Reactive microservices: clustering, messaging, or service mesh — a comparison

Thank you to Dr. Clement Escoffier, Vert.x Core Engineer, Red Hat, for review and diagrams.

In the day and age of Kubernetes and microservices, traditional implementations of clustered services need to be reevaluated, and Vert.x Clustering is no exception. Kubernetes and Vert.x microservices provide functionality that overlaps Vert.x Clustering, but do not replace it entirely. This article will compare the approaches and offer pragmatic pros and cons for each.

Vert.x Clustering

With Vert.x Clustering, Vert.x can be run as a set of clustered instances that provide capabilities for high availability, distributed data, and a distributed Vert.x Event Bus. These are capabilities that are needed for deploying Verticles across multiple Vert.x instances and to have them perform in unison.

Continue reading “Reactive microservices: clustering, messaging, or service mesh — a comparison”

Decision Model & Notation – A new approach to business rules

Business rule engines (BRE) have been around for a long time. Introduced in the early 1990s, BREs have found application in many industries, particularly those that are heavily regulated where compliance and auditability are key concerns. A BRE enables complex rules and regulations to be encoded in a rule language, some of which bear a passing resemblance to English. The BRE can then evaluate the rules against enterprise data to ensure that the business transactions, etc. that the enterprise is performing comply with those rules. Today one of the most popular rule engines is Drools, an open source engine sponsored by Red Hat with a powerful rule language, called DRL, and a highly efficient algorithm that can scale to support hundreds of thousands of rules and terabytes of data.

Rule engines are a great idea. It’s much easier to simply specify all the rules that should apply to a particular transaction than it is to write a program in a traditional language like Java to verify compliance. And it’s much easier to change the rules in a BRE when needed than to modify and test a traditional application. Today’s focus on digital transformation is finding ever wider applications for BREs, from cleansing big data, to fraud detection to identifying patterns in event streams from the Internet of Things.

Continue reading “Decision Model & Notation – A new approach to business rules”