Enhanced containerized integration services on OpenShift: Red Hat JBoss Fuse Integration Services

Updated and enhanced integration services are now available on Red Hat OpenShift. A containerized, formatted version of Red Hat JBoss Fuse 6.3 is now available for simplified deployments on OpenShift instances.

Technology is shifting so rapidly — from cloud-based architectures, Internet of Things and a variety of devices for interaction, new data streams, and mobile apps, to name a few — that organizations have to be able to create and deploy applications and process data quickly. Traditional, monolithic systems and top-heavy ESB-style integration approaches tend to be too slow and rigid to enable this level rapid innovation.

That is where an agile integration framework like JBoss Fuse can be a foundational element in your IT and digital strategy. Agile integration has three core capabilities: distributed integration, containers, and an API-based architecture.

  1. JBoss Fuse uses the lightweight distributed integration patterns of the underlying Apache Camel project.
  2. As part of the JBoss middleware services on OpenShift, JBoss Fuse is available for rapid deployment within container and cloud environments. Red Hat OpenShift is based on Docker and Kubernetes. Container architectures allow developers to build and integrate traditional and microservices-based applications at scale quickly.
  3. JBoss Fuse can be used together with Red Hat 3scale API Management Platform as an engine to develop and deploy APIs, both internally to development groups and externally for customer and partner ecosystems.

Integration technologies help organizations build on their existing infrastructures even as they pivot to new cloud-based and service-based architectures.

Features (and Benefits) at a Glance

  • Spring Boot support
  • Custom-developed, containerized applications based on Apache Camel 2.18
  • Integration with Hystrix and Zipkin microservices frameworks
  • An optimized integration environment for microservices applications on Red Hat OpenShift
  • Path to transition off existing Apache Karake-based applications to cloud architectures
  • Consistent hybrid integration platform across their enterprise

More Information

Bringing Containerized Services and DevOps Closer to (Your) Reality

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For more than 10 years, Red Hat JBoss Middleware has been a successful business that deeply represented the Red Hat DNA: open source software. We expanded our product portfolio with projects created and imagined by the open source community; we decided to support other projects with contributors; and we also opened the source of technologies we acquired. Somewhere along the way, Linux containers, Kubernetes, and docker happened which made us realize that containerization of applications is the base for your next 20 years. The caveat in this is that a platform is only as important as the applications you run on top of it. In other words, a platform not running applications is not realizing its value. With that in mind, we made an important decision and investment to evolve our application portfolio in similar ways that we ask our customers to do to theirs: let’s take our Red Hat JBoss Middleware products, commonly deployed on Linux and Windows machines, and make them available as containerized deployments.

With the announcement of the availability of JBoss Data Virtualization for OpenShift we now have 100 percent of our Red Hat JBoss Middleware runtime portfolio containerized and available in Red Hat OpenShift, an enterprise-ready Kubernetes distribution with value-added capabilities that go from deploying your already packaged container images, to delivering a DevOps pipeline for an iterative development process.

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App Dev Cloud Stack – Open interoperability critical to success

This series started with the statement, what do you mean by “Can’t ignore the stack anymore?”

When your background is application development, you have spent many hours, days and years perfecting your craft. You have not only mastered languages and concepts, you have made it a point to learn to make good architectural decisions when pulling together the applications you develop.

The problem is, we tend to ignore the stack we are working on as much as we can. Well it’s time that we as application developers broadened our horizons a bit, expanding our understanding of the stack we work on with the introduction of Cloud, Platform As A Service (PaaS) and containers to our toolboxes.

Our tour of your Cloud stack continues, from our previous article in this series where we talked about our PaaS interface for our application delivery, onto how open interoperability is critical to the success of our Cloud stack.

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Red Hat announces availability of containerized middleware capabilities on OpenShift

A little more than two years ago, we announced Red Hat’s “xPaaS” initiative to provide Red Hat JBoss Middleware on OpenShift and introduce a new way of building and deploying enterprise applications. Our efforts in executing against that vision and roadmap have entailed a lot of work and have been very exciting.

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In-Memory Performance and Elastic Scale Data Management as a Cloud Service

Today we announced three new Red Hat JBoss Middleware services on OpenShift based on JBoss Fuse, JBoss BRMS, and JBoss Data Grid.

Performance and Scalability for Cloud Applications

With cloud computing, businesses expect and demand that their applications deliver higher performance, availability, reliability, flexibility, and scalability than ever before. But the influx of data is creating new obstacles that make it difficult for applications to meet the demands and expectations.

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Java EE: Onward and Upward!

For many observers, I believe the take-away from this year’s JavaOne was: “business as usual.” In some important ways, business as usual here is a good thing.

Is Java (EE) dead?

There have been rumors and pontifications regarding a supposed demise of enterprise Java. There certainly are many areas and drivers of disruptive innovation in enterprise software development: microservices, event-driven programming, and the Internet of Things (IoT) are just a few. And yes, for a new project beginning in isolation with no constraints or requirements of backward compatibility, legacy integration, or management at scale, there are many new platforms and frameworks that may seem at first to be well-suited for any one of these new areas. But how many enterprise projects have that luxury?

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Moments of truth, systems of record and systems of engagement: it all fits together with Red Hat JBoss Fuse

In 2001, I was in the final term of my master’s in e-Business at La Salle University in Barcelona. Ramon Ollé, who at the time was the chairman and CEO of Epson Europe, gave a master class on innovation and explained how, with the advent of the Internet (that had been around for “just” a decade), competition was no longer between multinational companies (e.g., General Motors vs. Toyota). Instead, competition was now among the cluster of vendors that formed a partner ecosystem around brands. Success was tied to the ability of the vendors in those ecosystems and their systems to collaborate real-time to enable the two main sources of customer satisfaction: exceeded expectations and speed.

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