ICYMI: The Advisor Says Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite Is Mature and Covers All the Bases

The Advisor (subscription required) has some very nice words about Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite. What is apparently a pleasant surprise is the Suite part of BPM Suite.

bpm

JBoss has had its BPM project since 2003, jBPM. jBPM does business process modeling; at its core, it is a Java-based workflow engine. While it has a graphical editor (for more traditional, less technical business analysts), it also works with Eclipse, which makes it a business process tool specially adapted for Java developers to work with.

Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite, however, has expanded over the past few years to include functionality outside business process modeling, included but not limited to:

  • Rules modeling
  • Complex event process modeling
  • Business resource planning
  • Simulations and optimization

It’s not exactly bedtime reading (at 127 pages), but this reference architecture walks through the development process for a BPM application, including all of the different choices at each step and the reasoning for choosing a specific option. For a simpler look at the functionality, you can also see the JBoss BPM Suite data sheet.

 

* ICYMI: in case you missed it

Intro to Scalability

Scalability is one of those words that can mean very different things to different people, even in the same context or the same project. It’s not so much nuanced as it is that the definition matters on perspective — scale can be different for different goals.

There will be upcoming posts on data virtualization, in-memory data grids, integration methods — all areas where an understanding of your current and future needs, resourcing, and loads are critical for planning. Going into those concepts, it helps to understand scale — not just “make it bigger,” but how you make it bigger and when and why.

Continue reading “Intro to Scalability”

Something Special, for Your Development Team

The Red Hat Developer’s Program has added something new: A developer’s subscription. For free.

Typically Red Hat subscriptions are associated with a system (physical, virtual, or cloud) to make it easier to audit where software packages are installed and how many subscriptions you need to purchase. Developer’s subscriptions work a little differently; they’re associated with a specific person, not a specific machine. This allows developers to have multiple systems running in their dev environment without being limited by available corporate subscriptions.

Some of the vital statistics for the developer’s subscription:

And More

The developer’s subscription covers Red Hat Enterprise Linux and its toolsets, but there is another toolset available that is critical for developers who are using container-based applications. That’s the Container Development Kit (CDK). Members of the Red Hat Developer Program can access the CDK in addition to the developer subscription. The CDK helps create containers which can run on Linux, RHEL Atomic, or OpenShift v3.

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