And the Winner Is…

The comparison between the bag of cash representing a MINI Cooper S and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 is kind of fun. JBoss EAP 7 — like a MINI Cooper S — is small, agile, fast, and fits easily in appropriately-sized containers.

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As part of this year’s Red Hat Summit — and to celebrate the release of JBOss EAP 7 — the Red Hat Middleware group held a drawing for a (metaphorical) bagful of cash equal to the value of a 2016 MINI Cooper S ($24,950 as of June 1, 2016). Anyone at Summit (who is not a Red Hat employee or relative) could enter the drawing.

And the drawing was last night! The winner is … drumroll ….

RYAN THAMES.

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Congratulations, Ryan!

Thank you to everyone who participated and who has visited the booth so far during Summit. It has been quite a ride this week.

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Left to right, Craig Muzilla, senior vice president of Application Platforms Business; Ryan Thames (winner); and Mark Little, CTO of JBoss middleware.

For reference….

The terms and conditions for this contest are available at https://www.redhat.com/files/resources/car-giveaway-contest-terms-conditions.pdf.

Mike Piech and Rich Sharples on Facebook LIVE from Red Hat Summit

Rich Sharples, senior director of product management, and Mike Piech, vice president of marketing, got together for a half hour at the end of the Summit day today to discuss some of the major issues that have come out related to middleware this week. There have been some major announcements: the new microprofile project, the release of Red Hat JBoss EAP 7, the growth of microservices, and the recent acquisition of 3scale and what that means for API management in Red Hat Middleware.

As a quick summary, two of the major themes underscoring a lot of the announcements around JBoss, middleware, and Java this week relate to things that are micro: microservices and microprofile.

Microservices has been a subtext in many of the JBoss EAP 7 sessions and in the OpenShift sessions because this containerized, immutable, consistent environment is what makes microservices possible.Containers fundamentally enable microservices. You have an underlying runtime that is commensurate with the idea of “micro.” You can scale elastically, add instances to scale up and down. The opportunity to change things as an application travels from the desktop to the data center is much less. These are communicating systems, and that’s what container orchestration is. It coordinates these complex webs. we’re The application is the only thing that matters. Operations is there to support the application. I hit a build button and it goes through my CI/CD system, and it’s the same configuration in the environment.

However, like any application or project architecture, it’s more than “JBoss + OpenShift  = awesome microservices.” There has to be consideration and weight given to the application and the underlying technology to find a structure that fits. Microservices architecture isn’t about taking everything you’ve got and decomposing it into atomic services. It’s about having a range of sizes and services, depending on what you need. It is important to be conscious of the trade-offs that come from the increased complexity of the system. It really depends on the organization and the technology platforms they have what architecture is appropriate.

That need to understand and define the underlying framework to do microservices effectively is the theme of the second topic: the microprofile. There are defined specifications for different Java platforms (Standard and Enterprise) but both have the assumption of large-scale, full server architectures. New wave development, though, is increasingly small, with small services in those larger complex systems. What Java EE introduced to development was consistency and dependability. As we move into a new containerized world, we must do it responsibly, preserving the consistency and stability of previous environments. The microprofile project was created because a lot of vendors – Red Hat, IBM. Tomitribe, Payara – were just on a Slack chat, discussing what they needed to do for microservices and ways they could implement it. And then there was a lightbulb: maybe there’s something here. This is a chance to bring the whole Java community around a new architecture, with the strengths and discipline they’ve already developed.

Watch the whole video. For microprofile, you can join the Google group or check out the microprofile site for more information and emerging discussions.

Red Hat Summit: Tuesday Recap

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Tuesday was the first official day of Red Hat Summit. (DevNation started on Monday.) There is a lot going on in middleware, down a lot of different tracks — application development, business automation, integration. Tuesday had an overall focus on containers; for middleware, that means that most of the sessions related to Red Hat Enterprise Application Platform 7 and how it works in cloud and container environments.

Don’t forget to check the Middelware Guide to Loving Summit for session highlights for each day and for social media channels to watch for live tweeting and general commentary.

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit: Tuesday Recap”

JBoss EAP 7 Fast and Sporty: The Cash / Car Giveaway

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 is small, agile, fast, and fits easily in appropriately-sized containers. There are a number of ways we’re showing our pride for the JBoss EAP 7 launch here at Summit, but one of the coolest is the cash / car giveaway, with a Mini Cooper S convertible, tucked inside a custom container.

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Starting today, Red Hat Summit attendees can enter a drawing to win an amount of cash equivalent to the price of the Mini Cooper S convertible ($24,950 as of June 1, 2016). Tablets to sign up are located at various JBoss booths in the Partner Pavilion of Moscone West. The drawing will be held Wednesday evening, so don’t delay.

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There are the normal restrictions: no Red Hat employees or friends and relatives of employees, and you do have to be a Red Hat Summit attendee to be eligible. The full contest terms and conditions are on the Red Hat website: 

https://www.redhat.com/files/resources/car-giveaway-contest-terms-conditions.pdf.

Good luck.

Red Hat Summit: Monday Recap

Yesterday was an incredibly exciting day at the DevNation general session. Two major things occurred (out of half a dozen things) related to middleware at Red Hat:

I summarized those two announcements with some thoughts on how they show the evolution and resilience of Java on LinkedIn. Read the whole thing, as they say.

Other highlights from Monday’s DevNation:

There’s a new photo album on the Middleware Facebook page, too, capturing a lot of moments from this week.

A Middleware Guide to Loving Red Hat Summit

Red Hat Summit and DevNation are this week in San Francisco. There will be over 200 sessions and labs, along with exhibits and demos in the pavilion, partner presentations, coding events, and (of course) contests and swag.

Take a tour of the red carpet.

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It can be hard to keep track of everything, so this is something of a cheatsheet to sessions and social media sites that have a running commentary on what’s what.

Session Lists and Recommendations

Social Media Sites to Follow

Continue reading “A Middleware Guide to Loving Red Hat Summit”

Summit Preview: Business Automation Highlights

There will be a lot of consultants at Red Hat Summit (have you registered yet?) and they provide an energizing blend of technical insight and real-world practicality on how to apply technology to a business problem.

There is an awesome Discovery Series at Summit that will allow you to interact directly with consultants. Justin Holmes, a leader in business automation at Red Hat, will be doing a couple of sessions on how to design business rules and event processing that allow your company to be more responsive and more consistent. Details are on the Services Blog.

Summit Preview: JBoss EAP Highlights

Next week is Red Hat Summit / DevNation in San Francisco. And you can still register!

My last highlight post touched on the many sessions and labs related to Red Hat middleware that will be at Summit this year, but (for the eagle-eyed reader) there was something missing: any sessions related to Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform.

There is a reason. Back in December, JBoss EAP 7 Beta was released, and this marked a significant technology advancement. JBoss EAP 7 is based on the Java EE 7 spec, which introduces a number of improvements in data handling, transactions, and other performance and development areas. Additionally, JBoss EAP 7 itself adds a lot of new features and continues down its previous path for lightweight, modular, and highly-configurable server instances.

Continue reading “Summit Preview: JBoss EAP Highlights”

Summit Preview: Integration Highlights

It is almost time for Red Hat Summit, in lovely San Francisco. Are you ready? You still have time to register!

I am doing a handful of preview posts. The session list is amazing, with about a dozen different tracks or focus areas, everything from application development (the heart of middleware) to cloud to systems management to storage. There are so many gems in these sessions; if you can attend, try to hit these. And if not — keep an eye out on the Summit page and social channels like Vimeo and YouTube. A lot of presentations post recordings or slide decks after Summit, and there is an incredible variety of information.

Today, I want to look at integration paths. There are a lot of really diverse and complex topics here, being broken down into real-life examples, things like data virtualization, API management, integrating data streams from multiple sources and protocols.

Continue reading “Summit Preview: Integration Highlights”