Eclipse MicroProfile 1.2 is Now Available

Eclipse MicroProfile, an open forum to collaborate on enterprise Java™ microservices, today announced the release of Eclipse MicroProfile 1.2.

Eclipse MicroProfile 1.2, which builds on the 1.1 version, updates the config API and adds the health check, fault tolerance, metrics, and JWT propagation APIs.

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The future of Java EE

At this stage the future of Java EE looks brighter than it has for quite a while as Oracle, working with Red Hat, IBM, other vendors and the wider community to move the specifications, TCKs and overall innovation to an open source foundation. I think in general most people in the Java community see this as positive but there are a few naysayers, even more of them in other non-JVM areas. The common thread throughout is along the lines of “who cares these days?” or “it’s far quicker and easier to accomplish the same things with framework X or language Y, anyway.” I’m not going to try to address all of the concerns which have been raised because many of the comments I’ve seen have clearly been subjective and bordering on click bait. However, I’m writing this piece to reiterate some things I’ve said over the years and which remain just as relevant today, in my opinion

I want to start though by saying that in all of this I am trying to remain objective. Of course in my current role I and Red Hat have a vested interest in Java EE but if you’ve known me long enough over the years you’ll know that I’m also a scientist and as such I base my opinions on observations and facts born out by those observations. If a fact or piece of data goes against a theory then I don’t ignore it, I review and likely update or replace the theory to match the facts. I’ve changed my opinion on many things throughout my career and I’m sure I will do so again.

OK so back to Java EE. Does this move to open source help the wider community? Is Java EE still relevant or has it had its day like so many technologies before it? I’m not going to link to other things I’ve written on Java EE and its future over the years as they’re easily searchable through your favourite engine. But in short, many people forget that Java EE represents an evolution of essential middleware capabilities which many mission critical applications require. It’s had a lot of bad press since its inception, some of it accurate and some of it less so. I think one of its big failings is that, like my favourite topic of transactions, it has been used and misused in environments where it wasn’t really appropriate. No stack or framework is going to be applicable to every problem space and of course developers are going to get frustrated if they try it and find it wanting and failing as a result.

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Eclipse MicroProfile continues its growth in the market

Organizations that have already embarked or are thinking about starting a digital transformation journey are assessing and looking for ways to leverage their Java EE expertise. IT development and operations have built Java expertise over years, and there is a challenge to balance their existing skill base with new digitally transformative technologies, such as microservices, APIs, container-based architectures, and reactive programming. Eclipse MicroProfile is an open source project and one of those digitally transformative technologies that enables and optimizes the development of microservices — using familiar Java EE technologies and APIs.

You can think of MicroProfile as minimal standard profile for Java microservices. As with Java EE, MicroProfile implementations across different vendors are fully interoperable.

MicroProfile is supported in WildFly Swarm on the recently announced Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, our polyglot runtime platform powered by OpenShift, Kubernetes, and OpenStack. This delivers on the goal of simplifying the inherent complexity of developing cloud native applications.

There are a lot of reasons to begin adopting MicroProfile:

  • Open source, of course
  • Agility in developing microservices
  • Ability to leverage innovation
  • Architectural interoperability across different vendor offerings
  • No vendor lock-in
  • Fast learning curve for Java EE users (Java EE users can leverage their knowledge when using MicroProfile)
  • Ability to run on Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes 

Since MicroProfile was announced in June 2016, a lot has happened.  MicroProfile v 1.0 was released on September 19, 2016. Its implementation interoperability was demonstrated on November 2016 at Devoxx, where Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, and Payara demoed a unified web application with underlying microservices which had been developed separately by each vendor using MicroProfile. In addition, MicroProfile became part of the Eclipse Foundation as an incubation project back in December 14, 2016. New members have joined MicroProfile, such as SOUJava, Hazelcast, Fujitsu, Hammock, and kumuluzEE (the complete list of members can be found here).

Future releases of MicroProfile will build upon the existing foundation with organic growth by adding configuration, security, health check, and fault tolerance APIs, as well as adding support for later versions of CDI, JAX-RS, and JSON-P. The MicroProfile open source project plans to put out releases on an agile schedule and based on feedback from the open source community, which is accessible to everyone. Join the conversation and check out the MicroProfile site.

Announcing the Alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Today Red Hat announced the alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). This is the first of many articles on the subject that will be published on the JBoss Middleware blog.

So what is RHOAR?

RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform. Specifically, the following application runtimes will be included in RHOAR:

  • Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) – existing Java EE / Spring apps.
  • WildFly Swarm running MicroProfile – Java EE centric MSA
  • Spring Boot / Cloud – Spring centric MSA
  • Vert.x – greenfield reactive Java
  • Node.js – greenfield reactive JavaScript

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Five Links: Dusting the Bookshelf Edition

Happy Friday, everyone!

There really isn’t a trend to the types of articles I’ve been hitting this week; there’s been a cornucopia of different topics, from security to leadership.

happy-friday-pics

Image credit: Quotes n Thoughts

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It’s Official: MicroProfile Is Now Eclipse MicroProfile

MicroProfile is a community project with the mission of optimizing Enterprise Java for a microservices architecture.  In a short period of time, MicroProfile has reached three important milestones:

  1. June 27, 2016: Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, Payara and the London Java Community announced MicroProfile at DevNation.
  2. September 19, 2016: MicroProfile 1.0 was released at JavaOne 2016 with 5 implementations (and a 6th planned). The SouJava community joined to support the effort and Hammock was added as a implementation.
  3. December 14, 2016: The Eclipse Foundation Board approved the MicroProfile proposal, meaning that Eclipse MicroProfile is now an Eclipse incubator project. Mike Milinkovich, Eclipse Foundation Executive Director,  informed the community shortly after the vote.

The community is having active discussions on process (project evolution) and microservice APIs like application configuration, monitoring, health check, messaging, circuit breakers, and more.  Some discussions are even backed by real (proof of concept) code! The MicroProfile community is currently planning its next release. Feel free to join the discussion and help define the future of Enterprise Java microservices!