Enhanced containerized integration services on OpenShift: Red Hat JBoss Fuse Integration Services

Updated and enhanced integration services are now available on Red Hat OpenShift. A containerized, formatted version of Red Hat JBoss Fuse 6.3 is now available for simplified deployments on OpenShift instances.

Technology is shifting so rapidly — from cloud-based architectures, Internet of Things and a variety of devices for interaction, new data streams, and mobile apps, to name a few — that organizations have to be able to create and deploy applications and process data quickly. Traditional, monolithic systems and top-heavy ESB-style integration approaches tend to be too slow and rigid to enable this level rapid innovation.

That is where an agile integration framework like JBoss Fuse can be a foundational element in your IT and digital strategy. Agile integration has three core capabilities: distributed integration, containers, and an API-based architecture.

  1. JBoss Fuse uses the lightweight distributed integration patterns of the underlying Apache Camel project.
  2. As part of the JBoss middleware services on OpenShift, JBoss Fuse is available for rapid deployment within container and cloud environments. Red Hat OpenShift is based on Docker and Kubernetes. Container architectures allow developers to build and integrate traditional and microservices-based applications at scale quickly.
  3. JBoss Fuse can be used together with Red Hat 3scale API Management Platform as an engine to develop and deploy APIs, both internally to development groups and externally for customer and partner ecosystems.

Integration technologies help organizations build on their existing infrastructures even as they pivot to new cloud-based and service-based architectures.

Features (and Benefits) at a Glance

  • Spring Boot support
  • Custom-developed, containerized applications based on Apache Camel 2.18
  • Integration with Hystrix and Zipkin microservices frameworks
  • An optimized integration environment for microservices applications on Red Hat OpenShift
  • Path to transition off existing Apache Karaf-based applications to cloud architectures
  • Consistent hybrid integration platform across their enterprise

More Information

Thank you JBoss partners

Thank you JBoss partners. You made our decade.

In the open source world (and I would say increasingly in the software world in general), the success of a new technology begins with active and vibrant communities that crank out compelling and useful technologies.

When the technology gets out and increases in popularity, early customers begin to trust it and it faces the challenge of being adopted by the mainstream market, which is composed predominantly by customers who are pragmatists in nature and that find it difficult to use a new product unless it has support in the market (other customers) and it has an ecosystem of partnerships and alliances with other vendors that serve their industry.

That’s why partners are key to technology products. The larger the partner ecosystem, the more trust customers can have and the better the chances of widespread adoption.

JBoss had started to create that partner ecosystem before it became part of the Red Hat family back in 2006. Many things have happened since those early years, and we’ve probably done a few right things along the way, as Red Hat has become the first open source company to surpass the two-billion-dollar revenue mark, and for the fourth consecutive year we have been awarded a 5-Star rating in the CRN 2016 Partner Program Guide – where vendor applications are assessed based on investments in program offerings, partner profitability, partner training, education and support, marketing programs and resources, sales support, and communication.

However, at the end of the day, it is really the partners who decide which technology partners they choose to pursue success in the marketplace.

In anticipation of the launch of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 (JBoss EAP), and of the 10th anniversary of JBoss becoming part of the Red Hat family, we offered our partners the opportunity to tell the world about out our collaboration.

So don’t take our word for it. Let our partners do the talking.

We are fortunate to have partners that have worked with JBoss for a long, long time. Some of them, such as Vizuri, were a JBoss partner before it became part of the Red Hat product family. Joe Dickman, senior vice president, explains that the widespread adoption of JBoss in the marketplace, especially among Fortune 500 companies, is “a testament to the ‘power of community collaboration and innovation’ that Red Hat embodies, which has forever changed the way that software is developed and businesses operate.”

Another JBoss veteran is Viada in Germany. In words of Daniel Braunsdorf, CEO of Viada in Germany, “Ten years ago JBoss was the first open source application server being really ‘enterprise-ready’”, and today “we are talking about a full stack of middleware suite products serving our customers needs by giving them more flexibility, agility, and speed to deliver innovative applications.”

James Chinn, CEO of Shadow-Soft, sums it up well: “Over the last decade, JBoss has come a long way in terms of improving performance as well as truly innovating in regards to the way applications run and are managed. With the release of JBoss EAP 7 comes a host of new features including full support of Java EE 7 and Java SE 8 (…) Furthermore, JBoss EAP 7 has also been upgraded to reduce start-up time and optimize networking port utilization making it truly ideal for running within Linux containers.”

SCSK from Japan trust the power of JBoss EAP 7 to drive open standardization and TCO reduction. In the words of Hisanao Takei, Senior Executive Officer, “SCSK thinks JBoss EAP 7 is the best choice that customers want for building open and standard infrastructure and especially expects system TCO reduction for virtual and cloud environment.”

Red Hat JBoss Middleware is at the core of many mission critical systems. And being intimately related with the other Red Hat middleware products, such as JBoss Fuse, enables our partners to support many different types of business customer needs. Hiroyuki Yamamoto, director at monoplus, Inc. in Japan, makes the point that “As business environments continue to evolve, we believe that JBoss Middleware will seamlessly contribute and support in the integration, co-operation and collaboration within businesses”.

Driven by the dynamism of information based sectors, it may be easy to forget that traditional businesses also need advanced enterprise systems to be successful. In such a traditional business as printing, our Japanese partner WingArc1st makes the point that “An enterprise printing platform needs to be highly reliable, stable and provide high performance for seamless operations,” and believe that “Red Hat Enterprise Linux and JBoss EAP 7 are important platforms” for the company’s SVF offering.

Matt Pavlovich, co-founder of Media Driver, abounds on how JBoss EAP 7 helps developers “to be more efficient by focusing their time on delivering business value versus fiddling with tech stacks.” No small feat, as he continues, “Whether it is deployed on-premise, in the cloud or via containers, JBoss EAP 7 provides deployment flexibility that can help DevOps teams avoid having to navigate tricky hurdles to get their environments up and running quickly.”

Regis Kuzel, senior vice president at LCN Services, takes pride at being an unbiased trusted advisor to their customers. “For LCN, the bottom line is you can’t do better than Red Hat JBoss EAP 7. It’s a well-thought-out platform. And it’s gaining market share because it works! We believe Red Hat JBoss EAP 7 is the best technology available at its core!”

In terms of innovation, Farhan Hussain, Founder and CEO, Open Source Architect has a clear view of the contribution of the new EAP7. “This new platform will help us provide reliable, cost-efficient and high-performing container-based solutions for on-site and cloud deployments, while enabling our joint customers to innovate and meet strict compliance, security, and regulatory requirements simultaneously!” says Farhan.

Heinz Wilming, Director, Red Hat JBoss Competence Center for our German partner akquinet, makes a point about the value that long term support provides to our common customers. As you are possibly aware, Red Hat JBoss Middleware product life cycles are generally three, five, or seven years in length, and for certain products can be extended by three (3) additional years (up to ten!), something not many vendors actually provide. In his words, “Long-lasting support, regular updates and interoperability ensure protection of investment and guaranteed future for both our customers and akquinet.”

Some of our partners have been supporting JBoss for a long time, and others have made investments more recently. This is the case of Opticca in Canada. Owner Ivan Cardona shares that “We’ve been deploying Middleware, SOA, and BPM platforms from the major providers for the past eight years. We’ve recently made a large investment In Red Hat’s JBoss solutions because our customers’ feedback led us to conclude open source is now a real option.”

A last word…

We are really happy we are getting this support from our partners. Many others share us in the 10th anniversary and you can learn more from our strategic alliances here. And find more in the JBoss partner ecosystem press release, here.

And for those that are still not in the ecosystem, please join us. We’re here to help you grow.

So let me conclude as I began.

Thank you, Red Hat partners. You made our decade. Ready for more?

PD: Keep reading here for blogs and additional quotes from partners worldwide about the new EAP7!

Building an API-Based Connected Healthcare Solution: Q&A Followup

Christina Lin (a technology evangelist for Red Hat) and Sameer Parulkar (middleware product marketing manager for Red Hat) conducted a webinar earlier this week about data integration challenges which specifically face healthcare providers. As promised, this is a brief roundup of the major questions that came out of the webinar and pointers to more detailed information about the demo. (If you would like more background on integration challenges in healthcare, we do have posts on integration architecture for healthcare and another on how to overcome integration challenges.)

A Quick Summary

The recording of the full webinar is available here, but I’ll summarize it briefly if you can’t watch it yet.

Continue reading “Building an API-Based Connected Healthcare Solution: Q&A Followup”

The Core Value of Integration

There is a new Red Hat infographic that summarizes the benefits (and power) of integration. I am only using excerpts here because it is a large-ish infographic, and it’s definitely worth viewing the whole thing. This is just a taste. (Even better, download the underlying whitepaper; it is very much worth reading.)

value-fuse-integration

The headline-making numbers come down, not surprisingly, to cost-savings:

  • 488% ROI in three years
  • Payback in 8.2 months
  • Over $1.4 million in annual savings

The most interesting thing that I saw is definitely part of that headline, but it’s a smaller part of it — over half ($838,800) of those annual savings come from making your IT staff more productive. When an application is integrated, it requires about 41% fewer staff to maintain it. There is a lot a variation here (defining integration is a whole ‘nother blog post) but the idea of saving money, increasing individual productivity, and reducing the staff to maintain applications doesn’t necessarily translate into cutting costs or reducing staff. The power of that, the core value of integration as I read it, is reallocating those precious resources to different operations for your company. Instead of keeping your current apps running, you could have a lot more available people and space to try to do new things, to reinvest in what your company does and move forward.

That’s pretty cool.

Healthcare Integration Solutions: Red Hat JBoss Fuse vs. JCAPS

As discussed in our previous post, healthcare companies face many integration challenges: complex data standards like HIPAA and HL7,  differences in applications across the healthcare industry, and increasing regulations about meaningful use and value-based care.

These challenges are compounded by legacy technologies. Many healthcare companies’ internal enterprise applications were set up years ago using various data formats that cannot directly interoperate with one another.  One way to solve this problem was to turn to enterprise service buses (ESBs) to transform and normalize data across different applications for cross-company communications, and a popular system was Java Composite Application Platform Suite (JCAPS). JCAPS was an effective way to integrate existing systems using ESBs to standardize data– and critical for healthcare providers, it offered support for HL7 data standards. JCAPS also introduced business services which allowed IT architects to design service-oriented architectures (SOA) to try to make those separate systems more responsive.

However, Oracle is quietly deprecating JCAPS — the end of extended support is next January — and customers are being advised to migrate to a different Oracle suite. With a deadline looming in less than a year, IT leaders in the healthcare industry have to start looking for a new integration solution. Now is the time to start defining the requirements for the next generation of healthcare data interoperability solution.

Continue reading “Healthcare Integration Solutions: Red Hat JBoss Fuse vs. JCAPS”

Red Hat announces availability of containerized middleware capabilities on OpenShift

A little more than two years ago, we announced Red Hat’s “xPaaS” initiative to provide Red Hat JBoss Middleware on OpenShift and introduce a new way of building and deploying enterprise applications. Our efforts in executing against that vision and roadmap have entailed a lot of work and have been very exciting.

Continue reading “Red Hat announces availability of containerized middleware capabilities on OpenShift”