Java EE moves to Eclipse

If you’ve been following the news about Oracle’s new direction for Java EE, you’ll know that one of the motivations for changing the governance and process is to move Java EE forward in a more agile and responsive manner.

So it’s a good sign that within a month of initially  announcing their intentions, Oracle (with help from IBM and Red Hat) have chosen the Eclipse Foundation as the future home for Java EE. You can read Oracle’s announcement here.

This is a pretty important, first, tangible step in moving Enterprise Java forward and it’s encouraging to see Oracle moving ahead at a rapid pace. Java EE is an established technology that many organizations depend on for their business critical applications. Java EE is also a large body of work with Technology Specifications, Reference Implementations and TCKs from multiple vendors and open source projects so there’s still a significant amount of work yet to happen – but this is a great start.

Oracle’s announcement to move Java EE to an Open Source foundation has already begun to energize the community, offering the opportunity to more quickly evolve the platform to meet modern workloads. The Eclipse Foundation will be significant enabler in that evolution and Red Hat fully supports Oracle’s decision. Eclipse already hosts many projects of a similar size and complexity as Java EE, and we’re confident that the many years of experience and expertise the Eclipse Foundation has with other Java technologies ensures that this will be a successful move.

MicroProfile is also an Eclipse Foundation project and Red Hat hopes this will make it easier to align Java EE and MicroProfile in the future. The MicroProfile project was started in June 2016 as a collaboration between Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, Payara and others in the Java community with the goal of making Enterprise Java more relevant to developers building cloud-native applications.

Red Hat is an Eclipse Foundation member and has worked with the Eclipse Foundation for many years on projects as diverse as JBossTools, IoT, Kapua, Vert.x and Che and we look forward to working with with Oracle, IBM, The Eclipse Foundation and others on the future of Java EE.

Bringing Containerized Services and DevOps Closer to (Your) Reality

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For more than 10 years, Red Hat JBoss Middleware has been a successful business that deeply represented the Red Hat DNA: open source software. We expanded our product portfolio with projects created and imagined by the open source community; we decided to support other projects with contributors; and we also opened the source of technologies we acquired. Somewhere along the way, Linux containers, Kubernetes, and docker happened which made us realize that containerization of applications is the base for your next 20 years. The caveat in this is that a platform is only as important as the applications you run on top of it. In other words, a platform not running applications is not realizing its value. With that in mind, we made an important decision and investment to evolve our application portfolio in similar ways that we ask our customers to do to theirs: let’s take our Red Hat JBoss Middleware products, commonly deployed on Linux and Windows machines, and make them available as containerized deployments.

With the announcement of the availability of JBoss Data Virtualization for OpenShift we now have 100 percent of our Red Hat JBoss Middleware runtime portfolio containerized and available in Red Hat OpenShift, an enterprise-ready Kubernetes distribution with value-added capabilities that go from deploying your already packaged container images, to delivering a DevOps pipeline for an iterative development process.

Continue reading “Bringing Containerized Services and DevOps Closer to (Your) Reality”

Five features of JBoss EAP that will help get you production ready

JBoss Enterprise Application Server 7 has been out since June, and if you build and deliver using a Java EE environment and haven’t yet upgraded to EAP7, it’s time to make the jump.

Here’s a look at what’s new in JBoss EAP 7, what has changed since JBoss EAP 6, and how to get the most out of JBoss EAP 7 as your Java EE7 server.

Overview

JBoss EAP 7 is based on WildFly Application Server 10, which provides a complete implementation of the Java EE 7 Full and Web Profile standards. WildFly 10 does much to simplify modern application delivery based on containers and microservices.

JBoss EAP 7 features certified support for Java EE7 and Java 8 SE. The WildFly integration brings experimental Java 9 support, too. It also supports current development snapshots of Java 9, which is expected for release this fall.

The JBoss EAP 7 release is available for download from JBoss.org.

Continue reading “Five features of JBoss EAP that will help get you production ready”

Upcoming Webinar: Reimagine Your Java Applications

Bilge Ozpeynirci (senior product manager for Red Hat) and Thomas Qvarnstrom (JBoss technology evangelist) will be conducting a webinar about trends in application development and how these changes can influence your Java EE infrastructure, applications, and architectures.

IT is changing rapidly and in a lot of different areas: processes like DevOps, architectures like microservices, and technologies like containers. This not only affects upcoming changes in your IT infrastructure, it can affect how you maintain, migrate, or update existing applications and infrastructure.

This webinar looks at how Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 and Red Hat OpenShift 3 can be used together to effectively manage existing Java  applications and begin moving into a cloud and container based environment.

Registration is open. The webinar is July 26 at 11:00am Eastern Time (US).

register_now

Fun Follow Up: Webinar Q&A

I will collect any questions asked during the webinar, and I’ll do a follow-up post on Friday, June 29, to try to capture the most interesting questions that arise.

And the Winner Is…

The comparison between the bag of cash representing a MINI Cooper S and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 is kind of fun. JBoss EAP 7 — like a MINI Cooper S — is small, agile, fast, and fits easily in appropriately-sized containers.

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As part of this year’s Red Hat Summit — and to celebrate the release of JBOss EAP 7 — the Red Hat Middleware group held a drawing for a (metaphorical) bagful of cash equal to the value of a 2016 MINI Cooper S ($24,950 as of June 1, 2016). Anyone at Summit (who is not a Red Hat employee or relative) could enter the drawing.

And the drawing was last night! The winner is … drumroll ….

RYAN THAMES.

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Congratulations, Ryan!

Thank you to everyone who participated and who has visited the booth so far during Summit. It has been quite a ride this week.

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Left to right, Craig Muzilla, senior vice president of Application Platforms Business; Ryan Thames (winner); and Mark Little, CTO of JBoss middleware.

For reference….

The terms and conditions for this contest are available at https://www.redhat.com/files/resources/car-giveaway-contest-terms-conditions.pdf.

JBoss EAP 7: An Enterprise-Grade Microservice Platform

Cross-posted from the Shadow-Soft blog.

As we move closer and closer to Red Hat Summit, so does the anticipated full GA release of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.  For those of you who are unaware, JBoss EAP is the market leading commercially supported open source Java EE application server.  Over the last decade, JBoss has come a long way in terms of improving performance as well as truly innovating in regards to the way applications run and are managed.  With the release of EAP 7 comes a host of new features including full support of Java EE 7 and Java SE 8.

With the growing interest of Linux containers and the rising usage of Docker globally, Red Hat aimed to redesign EAP 7 to feature an extremely low-memory footprint for high density deployments.  Furthermore, EAP 7 has also been upgraded to reduce start-up time and optimize networking port utilization making it truly ideal for running within Linux containers.  Most importantly though, we at Shadow-Soft are truly excited about the latest JBoss sub-project, Wildfly Swarm.

Wildfly Swarm helps fit EAP into a containerized world by enabling end-users to package Java EE application with just enough WildFly (The upstream project of JBoss EAP) components into a single standalone jar file.  That’s right, you’ll be able to run your application as “java -jar myapp.jar”  making deployments far more simplistic and small than previously possible.  This empowers you to selectively choose the features you want included within your deployment.  This may seem a bit odd to traditional Middleware administrators, but this type of packaging fits perfectly into a Microservice architecture where applications & services are automatically being dispersed across a one or multiple data centers.  If you’re interested in learning more about the latest technology, contact us today.

Gain Competitive Advantage and Engage Customers with EDB Postgres and Red Hat JBoss

The world is experiencing the greatest information explosion in history:

  • 90% of the world’s data was created in the last five years, and most of it is unstructured. The volume, velocity, and variety of data are unprecedented.
  • Gartner says by 2020, 25 billion connected things will be generating data 24x7x365.

This incredible expansion in the volume, velocity, and variety of data is the engine driving the torrid pace of innovation that we experience today. Companies everywhere strive to understand more about their customers through data, and are then trying to use that data to better service their needs.  This data, when coupled with analytics and new applications that can be developed quickly and then easily updated, drives competitive advantage. Enterprises that harness the power of this data with new applications better and faster than their competitors will lead their industries.

Continue reading “Gain Competitive Advantage and Engage Customers with EDB Postgres and Red Hat JBoss”

Thank you JBoss partners

Thank you JBoss partners. You made our decade.

In the open source world (and I would say increasingly in the software world in general), the success of a new technology begins with active and vibrant communities that crank out compelling and useful technologies.

When the technology gets out and increases in popularity, early customers begin to trust it and it faces the challenge of being adopted by the mainstream market, which is composed predominantly by customers who are pragmatists in nature and that find it difficult to use a new product unless it has support in the market (other customers) and it has an ecosystem of partnerships and alliances with other vendors that serve their industry.

That’s why partners are key to technology products. The larger the partner ecosystem, the more trust customers can have and the better the chances of widespread adoption.

JBoss had started to create that partner ecosystem before it became part of the Red Hat family back in 2006. Many things have happened since those early years, and we’ve probably done a few right things along the way, as Red Hat has become the first open source company to surpass the two-billion-dollar revenue mark, and for the fourth consecutive year we have been awarded a 5-Star rating in the CRN 2016 Partner Program Guide – where vendor applications are assessed based on investments in program offerings, partner profitability, partner training, education and support, marketing programs and resources, sales support, and communication.

However, at the end of the day, it is really the partners who decide which technology partners they choose to pursue success in the marketplace.

In anticipation of the launch of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 (JBoss EAP), and of the 10th anniversary of JBoss becoming part of the Red Hat family, we offered our partners the opportunity to tell the world about out our collaboration.

So don’t take our word for it. Let our partners do the talking.

We are fortunate to have partners that have worked with JBoss for a long, long time. Some of them, such as Vizuri, were a JBoss partner before it became part of the Red Hat product family. Joe Dickman, senior vice president, explains that the widespread adoption of JBoss in the marketplace, especially among Fortune 500 companies, is “a testament to the ‘power of community collaboration and innovation’ that Red Hat embodies, which has forever changed the way that software is developed and businesses operate.”

Another JBoss veteran is Viada in Germany. In words of Daniel Braunsdorf, CEO of Viada in Germany, “Ten years ago JBoss was the first open source application server being really ‘enterprise-ready’”, and today “we are talking about a full stack of middleware suite products serving our customers needs by giving them more flexibility, agility, and speed to deliver innovative applications.”

James Chinn, CEO of Shadow-Soft, sums it up well: “Over the last decade, JBoss has come a long way in terms of improving performance as well as truly innovating in regards to the way applications run and are managed. With the release of JBoss EAP 7 comes a host of new features including full support of Java EE 7 and Java SE 8 (…) Furthermore, JBoss EAP 7 has also been upgraded to reduce start-up time and optimize networking port utilization making it truly ideal for running within Linux containers.”

SCSK from Japan trust the power of JBoss EAP 7 to drive open standardization and TCO reduction. In the words of Hisanao Takei, Senior Executive Officer, “SCSK thinks JBoss EAP 7 is the best choice that customers want for building open and standard infrastructure and especially expects system TCO reduction for virtual and cloud environment.”

Red Hat JBoss Middleware is at the core of many mission critical systems. And being intimately related with the other Red Hat middleware products, such as JBoss Fuse, enables our partners to support many different types of business customer needs. Hiroyuki Yamamoto, director at monoplus, Inc. in Japan, makes the point that “As business environments continue to evolve, we believe that JBoss Middleware will seamlessly contribute and support in the integration, co-operation and collaboration within businesses”.

Driven by the dynamism of information based sectors, it may be easy to forget that traditional businesses also need advanced enterprise systems to be successful. In such a traditional business as printing, our Japanese partner WingArc1st makes the point that “An enterprise printing platform needs to be highly reliable, stable and provide high performance for seamless operations,” and believe that “Red Hat Enterprise Linux and JBoss EAP 7 are important platforms” for the company’s SVF offering.

Matt Pavlovich, co-founder of Media Driver, abounds on how JBoss EAP 7 helps developers “to be more efficient by focusing their time on delivering business value versus fiddling with tech stacks.” No small feat, as he continues, “Whether it is deployed on-premise, in the cloud or via containers, JBoss EAP 7 provides deployment flexibility that can help DevOps teams avoid having to navigate tricky hurdles to get their environments up and running quickly.”

Regis Kuzel, senior vice president at LCN Services, takes pride at being an unbiased trusted advisor to their customers. “For LCN, the bottom line is you can’t do better than Red Hat JBoss EAP 7. It’s a well-thought-out platform. And it’s gaining market share because it works! We believe Red Hat JBoss EAP 7 is the best technology available at its core!”

In terms of innovation, Farhan Hussain, Founder and CEO, Open Source Architect has a clear view of the contribution of the new EAP7. “This new platform will help us provide reliable, cost-efficient and high-performing container-based solutions for on-site and cloud deployments, while enabling our joint customers to innovate and meet strict compliance, security, and regulatory requirements simultaneously!” says Farhan.

Heinz Wilming, Director, Red Hat JBoss Competence Center for our German partner akquinet, makes a point about the value that long term support provides to our common customers. As you are possibly aware, Red Hat JBoss Middleware product life cycles are generally three, five, or seven years in length, and for certain products can be extended by three (3) additional years (up to ten!), something not many vendors actually provide. In his words, “Long-lasting support, regular updates and interoperability ensure protection of investment and guaranteed future for both our customers and akquinet.”

Some of our partners have been supporting JBoss for a long time, and others have made investments more recently. This is the case of Opticca in Canada. Owner Ivan Cardona shares that “We’ve been deploying Middleware, SOA, and BPM platforms from the major providers for the past eight years. We’ve recently made a large investment In Red Hat’s JBoss solutions because our customers’ feedback led us to conclude open source is now a real option.”

A last word…

We are really happy we are getting this support from our partners. Many others share us in the 10th anniversary and you can learn more from our strategic alliances here. And find more in the JBoss partner ecosystem press release, here.

And for those that are still not in the ecosystem, please join us. We’re here to help you grow.

So let me conclude as I began.

Thank you, Red Hat partners. You made our decade. Ready for more?

PD: Keep reading here for blogs and additional quotes from partners worldwide about the new EAP7!

A Look at JBoss Core Services Collections

Middleware itself is a collection of services that enables developers to create applications and then those applications to run in an effective way. These services consist of things that are near-universal and applicable to any architecture or environment — things like messaging, transactions, logging, even management APIs.

That leads us to Red Hat JBoss Core Services Collection, which is a slightly newer (and easier) way of delivering some of the services that our customers require. Like the name says, this is a collection of common services that are critical for application developers, making it easier to design secure applications that are deployed in heterogeneous environments.

As of today, there are five services included with a JBoss Core Services Collection subscription:

  • JBoss Operations Network, a monitoring and management server which is designed to manage JBoss middleware and Java applications.
  • An integrated single sign-on server which supports SAML-based authentication, OAuth, and other open protocols for simplified authentication management
  • The ever-popular Apache HTTP server
  • The Apache Commons Jsvc daemon, which optimizes Java performance on Unix-based systems
  • Connectors for other web servers, such as Microsoft IIS and Oracle iPlanet

So, What’s the Deal?

To reiterate the purpose of middleware: Modern application development requires security, flexibility, and the ability to integrate with other applications and services.

Continue reading “A Look at JBoss Core Services Collections”

Summit Preview: JBoss EAP Highlights

Next week is Red Hat Summit / DevNation in San Francisco. And you can still register!

My last highlight post touched on the many sessions and labs related to Red Hat middleware that will be at Summit this year, but (for the eagle-eyed reader) there was something missing: any sessions related to Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform.

There is a reason. Back in December, JBoss EAP 7 Beta was released, and this marked a significant technology advancement. JBoss EAP 7 is based on the Java EE 7 spec, which introduces a number of improvements in data handling, transactions, and other performance and development areas. Additionally, JBoss EAP 7 itself adds a lot of new features and continues down its previous path for lightweight, modular, and highly-configurable server instances.

Continue reading “Summit Preview: JBoss EAP Highlights”

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