Java EE moves to Eclipse

If you’ve been following the news about Oracle’s new direction for Java EE, you’ll know that one of the motivations for changing the governance and process is to move Java EE forward in a more agile and responsive manner.

So it’s a good sign that within a month of initially  announcing their intentions, Oracle (with help from IBM and Red Hat) have chosen the Eclipse Foundation as the future home for Java EE. You can read Oracle’s announcement here.

This is a pretty important, first, tangible step in moving Enterprise Java forward and it’s encouraging to see Oracle moving ahead at a rapid pace. Java EE is an established technology that many organizations depend on for their business critical applications. Java EE is also a large body of work with Technology Specifications, Reference Implementations and TCKs from multiple vendors and open source projects so there’s still a significant amount of work yet to happen – but this is a great start.

Oracle’s announcement to move Java EE to an Open Source foundation has already begun to energize the community, offering the opportunity to more quickly evolve the platform to meet modern workloads. The Eclipse Foundation will be significant enabler in that evolution and Red Hat fully supports Oracle’s decision. Eclipse already hosts many projects of a similar size and complexity as Java EE, and we’re confident that the many years of experience and expertise the Eclipse Foundation has with other Java technologies ensures that this will be a successful move.

MicroProfile is also an Eclipse Foundation project and Red Hat hopes this will make it easier to align Java EE and MicroProfile in the future. The MicroProfile project was started in June 2016 as a collaboration between Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, Payara and others in the Java community with the goal of making Enterprise Java more relevant to developers building cloud-native applications.

Red Hat is an Eclipse Foundation member and has worked with the Eclipse Foundation for many years on projects as diverse as JBossTools, IoT, Kapua, Vert.x and Che and we look forward to working with with Oracle, IBM, The Eclipse Foundation and others on the future of Java EE.

The future of Java EE

At this stage the future of Java EE looks brighter than it has for quite a while as Oracle, working with Red Hat, IBM, other vendors and the wider community to move the specifications, TCKs and overall innovation to an open source foundation. I think in general most people in the Java community see this as positive but there are a few naysayers, even more of them in other non-JVM areas. The common thread throughout is along the lines of “who cares these days?” or “it’s far quicker and easier to accomplish the same things with framework X or language Y, anyway.” I’m not going to try to address all of the concerns which have been raised because many of the comments I’ve seen have clearly been subjective and bordering on click bait. However, I’m writing this piece to reiterate some things I’ve said over the years and which remain just as relevant today, in my opinion

I want to start though by saying that in all of this I am trying to remain objective. Of course in my current role I and Red Hat have a vested interest in Java EE but if you’ve known me long enough over the years you’ll know that I’m also a scientist and as such I base my opinions on observations and facts born out by those observations. If a fact or piece of data goes against a theory then I don’t ignore it, I review and likely update or replace the theory to match the facts. I’ve changed my opinion on many things throughout my career and I’m sure I will do so again.

OK so back to Java EE. Does this move to open source help the wider community? Is Java EE still relevant or has it had its day like so many technologies before it? I’m not going to link to other things I’ve written on Java EE and its future over the years as they’re easily searchable through your favourite engine. But in short, many people forget that Java EE represents an evolution of essential middleware capabilities which many mission critical applications require. It’s had a lot of bad press since its inception, some of it accurate and some of it less so. I think one of its big failings is that, like my favourite topic of transactions, it has been used and misused in environments where it wasn’t really appropriate. No stack or framework is going to be applicable to every problem space and of course developers are going to get frustrated if they try it and find it wanting and failing as a result.

Continue reading “The future of Java EE”

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes + JBoss EAP for fast, lightweight, Java EE cloud applications

Have you read the announcement of the alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR)? We also posted an introduction to the component in RHOAR earlier.

Red Hat Intends to include entitlements for the JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) as part of a Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) subscription.  The reasoning for this is dead simple, there is still strong demand for a Java application platform the implements the Java EE specification. JBoss EAP 7 fits that requirements with certified full platform and web profile support for the Java EE 7 specification. Best of all, JBoss EAP offers Java EE 7 capabilities in a small, fast, cloud ready footprint. It has been available on the OpenShift Cloud Platform (OCP) since version 6. JBoss EAP is cloud ready and deserves to be included as a RHOAR component.

I want to believe. Prove that JBoss is small and fast!

First lets agree on what a Java EE application platform is. I propose a minimalist definition. That being, a Java EE application platform is verified to have implemented a specific Java EE specification. The current Java EE 7 specification is extensive and runs 290 pages long. Implementing the details is no trivial task. As of the date of this article, there are eight products that have been verified by Oracle to be Java EE 7 full platform compatible implementations. Red Hat JBoss EAP 7 is one of those products. However, Apache Tomcat, JBoss Web Server, and Pivotal tcServer are not on the list. Those products are not Java EE application platforms.

Continue reading “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes + JBoss EAP for fast, lightweight, Java EE cloud applications”

Eclipse MicroProfile continues its growth in the market

Organizations that have already embarked or are thinking about starting a digital transformation journey are assessing and looking for ways to leverage their Java EE expertise. IT development and operations have built Java expertise over years, and there is a challenge to balance their existing skill base with new digitally transformative technologies, such as microservices, APIs, container-based architectures, and reactive programming. Eclipse MicroProfile is an open source project and one of those digitally transformative technologies that enables and optimizes the development of microservices — using familiar Java EE technologies and APIs.

You can think of MicroProfile as minimal standard profile for Java microservices. As with Java EE, MicroProfile implementations across different vendors are fully interoperable.

MicroProfile is supported in WildFly Swarm on the recently announced Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, our polyglot runtime platform powered by OpenShift, Kubernetes, and OpenStack. This delivers on the goal of simplifying the inherent complexity of developing cloud native applications.

There are a lot of reasons to begin adopting MicroProfile:

  • Open source, of course
  • Agility in developing microservices
  • Ability to leverage innovation
  • Architectural interoperability across different vendor offerings
  • No vendor lock-in
  • Fast learning curve for Java EE users (Java EE users can leverage their knowledge when using MicroProfile)
  • Ability to run on Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes 

Since MicroProfile was announced in June 2016, a lot has happened.  MicroProfile v 1.0 was released on September 19, 2016. Its implementation interoperability was demonstrated on November 2016 at Devoxx, where Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, and Payara demoed a unified web application with underlying microservices which had been developed separately by each vendor using MicroProfile. In addition, MicroProfile became part of the Eclipse Foundation as an incubation project back in December 14, 2016. New members have joined MicroProfile, such as SOUJava, Hazelcast, Fujitsu, Hammock, and kumuluzEE (the complete list of members can be found here).

Future releases of MicroProfile will build upon the existing foundation with organic growth by adding configuration, security, health check, and fault tolerance APIs, as well as adding support for later versions of CDI, JAX-RS, and JSON-P. The MicroProfile open source project plans to put out releases on an agile schedule and based on feedback from the open source community, which is accessible to everyone. Join the conversation and check out the MicroProfile site.

Five Links: Band of Brothers Edition

Happy Friday, everyone.

Red Hat has a lot of corporate blogs (worth reading!), but a huge part of our culture as a company is collaboration and meritocracy. As in … letting our opinions be known. There’s a reason we actually made a t-shirt to commemorate our corporation-wide mailing list.

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From Pinterest

A lot of Red Hatters have personal blogs (or active LinkedIn postings) precisely because of the value that we as a group place on transparency, defending ideas, and innovation.

This week, I want to highlight some of the blogs by Red Hatters that I’ve read recently. I’m not even going to call this a “top 5,” because we have a lot of prolific and interesting writers on a million different topics. These are a random sampling of the blogs that I hit periodically.

Continue reading “Five Links: Band of Brothers Edition”

It’s Official: MicroProfile Is Now Eclipse MicroProfile

MicroProfile is a community project with the mission of optimizing Enterprise Java for a microservices architecture.  In a short period of time, MicroProfile has reached three important milestones:

  1. June 27, 2016: Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, Payara and the London Java Community announced MicroProfile at DevNation.
  2. September 19, 2016: MicroProfile 1.0 was released at JavaOne 2016 with 5 implementations (and a 6th planned). The SouJava community joined to support the effort and Hammock was added as a implementation.
  3. December 14, 2016: The Eclipse Foundation Board approved the MicroProfile proposal, meaning that Eclipse MicroProfile is now an Eclipse incubator project. Mike Milinkovich, Eclipse Foundation Executive Director,  informed the community shortly after the vote.

The community is having active discussions on process (project evolution) and microservice APIs like application configuration, monitoring, health check, messaging, circuit breakers, and more.  Some discussions are even backed by real (proof of concept) code! The MicroProfile community is currently planning its next release. Feel free to join the discussion and help define the future of Enterprise Java microservices!

Five Links: All My Friends Are Dead Edition

Happy Friday, everyone.

The end of the year is often a season of reflection. This year, that reflection seems to have taken a nihilistic tinge, as a lot of people are declaring things dead. Change can feel like death, I guess, but I think it’s easy to conflate something evolving with that something going away. This week, I want to look at some of the technology deaths which, like Mark Twain’s, are greatly exaggerated.

dec-friday

Continue reading “Five Links: All My Friends Are Dead Edition”

Five Links: A Big Cup of Joe Edition

Happy Friday, everyone.

This week started off great with a bout on Monday with a lot of people talking about AI and virtual reality (links picked at random). I’m not saying I started a trend, I am simply observing a certain zeitgeist. This is week, I’ve been looking at more familiar worlds: Java, Java EE, and app development. This is the heart of what we do in middleware.

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Image credit: Headline Shirts. Also, the shirt is on sale now.

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Choosing a Java EE Application Platform, Pt. 2: Technical Considerations

Part 1 looks at a handful of business considerations that you need to account for when you’re looking at Java EE application platforms — but that is only a part of selecting anything for your IT environment. In addition to treating an IT decision as a capital asset, your planning has to include technical factors: current and future development models, different types of applications, even rapid data processing.

Success today depends on achieving high levels of agility and flexibility. Major technology trends like mobile, the Internet of Things, and big data rely on lightweight, iterative environments like virtualization, cloud, and containers. This is  forcing organizations to rethink their  application development and deployment processes, application architecture designs, and choice of technologies used to build and run applications.

Continue reading “Choosing a Java EE Application Platform, Pt. 2: Technical Considerations”

Choosing a Java EE Application Platform, Pt. 1: Business Considerations

Historically, choosing a Java EE application platform was like any major capital planning — it was driven by a clear business logic:

  • Support for your current platform was expiring.
  • You had to standardize your systems.
  • You needed to accommodate a legacy system.
  • You needed to reduce costs.
  • You needed to take advantage of a specific advancement in Java technology.

Those are still primary factors, but there are a lot of additional factors to consider for something as foundational as an application platform. Part one of this series covers the business questions; part 2 will be out later this week to look at some of the technical considerations. [UPDATE: Part 2 is now live.]

Business considerations have a significant role in IT decision-making because your partnerships and budget commitments directly impact your company’s development agility, ability to adopt new technologies, and internal and external design decisions. When you start weighing your options, aside from transaction costs, there are a handful of questions you must ask to make sure that you maintain business agility.

Continue reading “Choosing a Java EE Application Platform, Pt. 1: Business Considerations”

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