Mike Piech and Rich Sharples on Facebook LIVE from Red Hat Summit

Rich Sharples, senior director of product management, and Mike Piech, vice president of marketing, got together for a half hour at the end of the Summit day today to discuss some of the major issues that have come out related to middleware this week. There have been some major announcements: the new microprofile project, the release of Red Hat JBoss EAP 7, the growth of microservices, and the recent acquisition of 3scale and what that means for API management in Red Hat Middleware.

As a quick summary, two of the major themes underscoring a lot of the announcements around JBoss, middleware, and Java this week relate to things that are micro: microservices and microprofile.

Microservices has been a subtext in many of the JBoss EAP 7 sessions and in the OpenShift sessions because this containerized, immutable, consistent environment is what makes microservices possible.Containers fundamentally enable microservices. You have an underlying runtime that is commensurate with the idea of “micro.” You can scale elastically, add instances to scale up and down. The opportunity to change things as an application travels from the desktop to the data center is much less. These are communicating systems, and that’s what container orchestration is. It coordinates these complex webs. we’re The application is the only thing that matters. Operations is there to support the application. I hit a build button and it goes through my CI/CD system, and it’s the same configuration in the environment.

However, like any application or project architecture, it’s more than “JBoss + OpenShift  = awesome microservices.” There has to be consideration and weight given to the application and the underlying technology to find a structure that fits. Microservices architecture isn’t about taking everything you’ve got and decomposing it into atomic services. It’s about having a range of sizes and services, depending on what you need. It is important to be conscious of the trade-offs that come from the increased complexity of the system. It really depends on the organization and the technology platforms they have what architecture is appropriate.

That need to understand and define the underlying framework to do microservices effectively is the theme of the second topic: the microprofile. There are defined specifications for different Java platforms (Standard and Enterprise) but both have the assumption of large-scale, full server architectures. New wave development, though, is increasingly small, with small services in those larger complex systems. What Java EE introduced to development was consistency and dependability. As we move into a new containerized world, we must do it responsibly, preserving the consistency and stability of previous environments. The microprofile project was created because a lot of vendors – Red Hat, IBM. Tomitribe, Payara – were just on a Slack chat, discussing what they needed to do for microservices and ways they could implement it. And then there was a lightbulb: maybe there’s something here. This is a chance to bring the whole Java community around a new architecture, with the strengths and discipline they’ve already developed.

Watch the whole video. For microprofile, you can join the Google group or check out the microprofile site for more information and emerging discussions.

Red Hat Summit: Tuesday Recap

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Tuesday was the first official day of Red Hat Summit. (DevNation started on Monday.) There is a lot going on in middleware, down a lot of different tracks — application development, business automation, integration. Tuesday had an overall focus on containers; for middleware, that means that most of the sessions related to Red Hat Enterprise Application Platform 7 and how it works in cloud and container environments.

Don’t forget to check the Middelware Guide to Loving Summit for session highlights for each day and for social media channels to watch for live tweeting and general commentary.

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JBoss EAP 7 Fast and Sporty: The Cash / Car Giveaway

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 is small, agile, fast, and fits easily in appropriately-sized containers. There are a number of ways we’re showing our pride for the JBoss EAP 7 launch here at Summit, but one of the coolest is the cash / car giveaway, with a Mini Cooper S convertible, tucked inside a custom container.

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Starting today, Red Hat Summit attendees can enter a drawing to win an amount of cash equivalent to the price of the Mini Cooper S convertible ($24,950 as of June 1, 2016). Tablets to sign up are located at various JBoss booths in the Partner Pavilion of Moscone West. The drawing will be held Wednesday evening, so don’t delay.

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There are the normal restrictions: no Red Hat employees or friends and relatives of employees, and you do have to be a Red Hat Summit attendee to be eligible. The full contest terms and conditions are on the Red Hat website: 

https://www.redhat.com/files/resources/car-giveaway-contest-terms-conditions.pdf.

Good luck.

Red Hat Summit: Monday Recap

Yesterday was an incredibly exciting day at the DevNation general session. Two major things occurred (out of half a dozen things) related to middleware at Red Hat:

I summarized those two announcements with some thoughts on how they show the evolution and resilience of Java on LinkedIn. Read the whole thing, as they say.

Other highlights from Monday’s DevNation:

There’s a new photo album on the Middleware Facebook page, too, capturing a lot of moments from this week.

A Middleware Guide to Loving Red Hat Summit

Red Hat Summit and DevNation are this week in San Francisco. There will be over 200 sessions and labs, along with exhibits and demos in the pavilion, partner presentations, coding events, and (of course) contests and swag.

Take a tour of the red carpet.

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It can be hard to keep track of everything, so this is something of a cheatsheet to sessions and social media sites that have a running commentary on what’s what.

Session Lists and Recommendations

Social Media Sites to Follow

Continue reading “A Middleware Guide to Loving Red Hat Summit”

MicroProfile – Collaborating to bring Microservices to Enterprise Java

This post was originally published at Red Hat Developers.

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Today at the DevNation conference in San Francisco, Red Hat’s Mark Little was joined on-stage by Alasdair Nottingham from IBM, Theresa Nguyen from Tomitribe, Mike Croft from Payara and Martijn Verburg from the London Java Community to announce a new community collaboration – MicroProfile – whose goal is to make it easier for developers to use familiar Java EE technologies and APIs for building microservice applications.

Mark talked about some of the reasons Java EE has established itself as the dominant standard for companies building business-critical multi-tier enterprise applications, including :

  • An open standard platform that enables vendors to compete on implementation, price, or business model
  • A collaborative standard and process that is driven by many vendors and individual developers rather than a single vendor
  • Consistent and holistic vision for all architectural tiers of the application
  • A strong focus on adherence to the standard and compatibility between vendor implementations and versions of the specifications

As organizations start to think about the next generation of those business-critical applications, many of them are likely thinking about cloud-native, Linux containers and microservices, and how they evolve by using the technologies and skills they already have.

Red Hat, IBM, Payara, Tomitribe and the London Java Community believe that Enterprise Java is a solid foundation on which to build the next generation of applications and the MicroProfile (which may ultimately become a submission for a standard specification) can make it easier and provide portability between vendor’s implementations. The first release of the MicroProfile is expected to be available in September, with Red Hat’s implementation to be based on WildFly Swarm.

Red Hat continues to support those in the Enterprise Java community that are working hard to move Enterprise Java forward by pushing ahead on the evolution of Java EE. To emphasize this point, Red Hat has underlined its support for Java EE 8 and is committed to finishing the JSRs it leads, like CDI 2.0, and any necessary enhancements to Bean Validation while it also invests in the MicroProfile. We see synergy between the current Enterprise Java community efforts and the newly announced MicroProfile, which is born out of the same Enterprise Java community. To us it’s clear that the Enterprise Java community is forging ahead.

Red Hat understands that Enterprise Java has been successful for almost two decades thanks to the community collaboration that drove its evolution. Please join and participate in the MicroProfile effort and let’s all take the next step forward by cooperatively innovating to bring the microservice architecture to Enterprise Java.

Continuous Delivery to JBoss EAP and OpenShift with the CloudBees Jenkins Platform

If you are using JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) for J2EE development, the CloudBees Jenkins Platform provides an enterprise-class toolchain for an automated CI/CD from development to production.

The CloudBees Jenkins Platform now supports integrations with both Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) and Red Hat OpenShift across the software delivery pipeline. This enables developers to build, test and deploy applications, with Jenkins-based continuous delivery pipelines in JBoss via JBoss EAP 7 or JBoss EAP 7 on OpenShift.  

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JBoss EAP 7: An Enterprise-Grade Microservice Platform

Cross-posted from the Shadow-Soft blog.

As we move closer and closer to Red Hat Summit, so does the anticipated full GA release of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.  For those of you who are unaware, JBoss EAP is the market leading commercially supported open source Java EE application server.  Over the last decade, JBoss has come a long way in terms of improving performance as well as truly innovating in regards to the way applications run and are managed.  With the release of EAP 7 comes a host of new features including full support of Java EE 7 and Java SE 8.

With the growing interest of Linux containers and the rising usage of Docker globally, Red Hat aimed to redesign EAP 7 to feature an extremely low-memory footprint for high density deployments.  Furthermore, EAP 7 has also been upgraded to reduce start-up time and optimize networking port utilization making it truly ideal for running within Linux containers.  Most importantly though, we at Shadow-Soft are truly excited about the latest JBoss sub-project, Wildfly Swarm.

Wildfly Swarm helps fit EAP into a containerized world by enabling end-users to package Java EE application with just enough WildFly (The upstream project of JBoss EAP) components into a single standalone jar file.  That’s right, you’ll be able to run your application as “java -jar myapp.jar”  making deployments far more simplistic and small than previously possible.  This empowers you to selectively choose the features you want included within your deployment.  This may seem a bit odd to traditional Middleware administrators, but this type of packaging fits perfectly into a Microservice architecture where applications & services are automatically being dispersed across a one or multiple data centers.  If you’re interested in learning more about the latest technology, contact us today.

Gain Competitive Advantage and Engage Customers with EDB Postgres and Red Hat JBoss

The world is experiencing the greatest information explosion in history:

  • 90% of the world’s data was created in the last five years, and most of it is unstructured. The volume, velocity, and variety of data are unprecedented.
  • Gartner says by 2020, 25 billion connected things will be generating data 24x7x365.

This incredible expansion in the volume, velocity, and variety of data is the engine driving the torrid pace of innovation that we experience today. Companies everywhere strive to understand more about their customers through data, and are then trying to use that data to better service their needs.  This data, when coupled with analytics and new applications that can be developed quickly and then easily updated, drives competitive advantage. Enterprises that harness the power of this data with new applications better and faster than their competitors will lead their industries.

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Announcing JBoss EAP 7

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 is here.

This is a significant new release. There are the obvious benefits — Java EE 7 certification, numerous bug fixes, a simplified and more intuitive administrative UI — but there are a lot of features just under the hood that really make JBoss EAP 7 a pathway for IT departments and app developers to move their projects forward.

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Agility and Transformation

There are a lot of buzzwords and think-pieces on changes in IT, like bimodal development, microservices, DevOps, digital transformation, big data, Internet of Things.

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