A Look at JBoss Core Services Collections

Middleware itself is a collection of services that enables developers to create applications and then those applications to run in an effective way. These services consist of things that are near-universal and applicable to any architecture or environment — things like messaging, transactions, logging, even management APIs.

That leads us to Red Hat JBoss Core Services Collection, which is a slightly newer (and easier) way of delivering some of the services that our customers require. Like the name says, this is a collection of common services that are critical for application developers, making it easier to design secure applications that are deployed in heterogeneous environments.

As of today, there are five services included with a JBoss Core Services Collection subscription:

  • JBoss Operations Network, a monitoring and management server which is designed to manage JBoss middleware and Java applications.
  • An integrated single sign-on server which supports SAML-based authentication, OAuth, and other open protocols for simplified authentication management
  • The ever-popular Apache HTTP server
  • The Apache Commons Jsvc daemon, which optimizes Java performance on Unix-based systems
  • Connectors for other web servers, such as Microsoft IIS and Oracle iPlanet

So, What’s the Deal?

To reiterate the purpose of middleware: Modern application development requires security, flexibility, and the ability to integrate with other applications and services.

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How To Import Any JBoss BPM Suite Example Project

This tips & tricks comes to you after I have been asked the following repeatedly over the last few weeks by users of the JBoss BPM Suite demos:

“How can I import the projects associated with the various JBoss BPM Suite demo projects into my own existing installation?”

What this means is that users want to have an example project in their personal installation of the product without using the projects installation process. This is certainly possible but not totally obvious to everyone.

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Red Hat Summit Preview – Discovery session series

When we go to the Red Hat Summit this year in San Francisco, we have planned to attend sessions, labs, evening events and even maybe a few good seafood restaurants. Little did you know that there is a gem you might want to fit into your busy schedule, as it is a chance to meet some of the rock stars that are backing the  Red Hat Open Innovation Labs.

There will be a series of sessions hosted by experts to showcase use of Red Hat technologies and demonstrate the best practices with interactive white boarding. That is a personal touch session where you can interact with the storytellers and will be taking place in the West Lobby of M0scone Center on level 2.

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App Dev Cloud Stack – Open interoperability critical to success

This series started with the statement, what do you mean by “Can’t ignore the stack anymore?”

When your background is application development, you have spent many hours, days and years perfecting your craft. You have not only mastered languages and concepts, you have made it a point to learn to make good architectural decisions when pulling together the applications you develop.

The problem is, we tend to ignore the stack we are working on as much as we can. Well it’s time that we as application developers broadened our horizons a bit, expanding our understanding of the stack we work on with the introduction of Cloud, Platform As A Service (PaaS) and containers to our toolboxes.

Our tour of your Cloud stack continues, from our previous article in this series where we talked about our PaaS interface for our application delivery, onto how open interoperability is critical to the success of our Cloud stack.

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Building an API-Based Connected Healthcare Solution: Q&A Followup

Christina Lin (a technology evangelist for Red Hat) and Sameer Parulkar (middleware product marketing manager for Red Hat) conducted a webinar earlier this week about data integration challenges which specifically face healthcare providers. As promised, this is a brief roundup of the major questions that came out of the webinar and pointers to more detailed information about the demo. (If you would like more background on integration challenges in healthcare, we do have posts on integration architecture for healthcare and another on how to overcome integration challenges.)

A Quick Summary

The recording of the full webinar is available here, but I’ll summarize it briefly if you can’t watch it yet.

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Upcoming: Architecture Designs for Camel Developers

Bilgin Ibryam, a senior architect with Red Hat, will be conducting a webinar about design patterns for new architectures like microservices, IoT, and SOA — which Apache Camel developers can use to be more effective in their coding.

Apache Camel itself is based on defined set of design patterns for messaging and integration. This makes Apache Camel a natural framework for designing microservices and IoT applications, which are inherently distributed computing systems. However, developing applications in Camel requires layers of design decisions, because effectively isolating computing components requires a clear understanding of how they will be interacting. This webinar will call out commonly used patterns and design principles for Camel application development, based on real-world examples. This covers a variety of principles, from error handling to complex, multi-route applications, scalability, and high availability.

Registration is open. The webinar is Tuesday, June 7, at 11:00am Eastern Time (US).

register_now

Fun Follow Up: Webinar Q&A

I will collect any questions asked during the webinar, and I’ll do a follow-up post on Friday, June 10, to try to capture the most interesting (or confounding) questions that arise.

Defining A New Value for IT

One trending phrase for CIOs is digital transformation. While the phrase itself has an easily-discerned meaning (digital technologies are changing the way that businesses operate), it is a superficial simplicity. Since every organization has a unique culture, product, and customer set, the ways and means that those organizations will digitally transform is also unique. In a real sense, digital transformation is less about technology and more about culture change.

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Although it steers clear of the trendy buzzwords, this kind of culture change is at the heart of the whitepaper and Society for Information Management presentation by Jason Daube and Matt Lyteson of Red Hat IT.

The practical effect of digital transformation is that IT is no longer a back-office department. IT priorities — and IT challenges — now have a strategic impact on business priorities. WHat Daube and Lyteson outline is a high-level approach to aligning IT objectives with business objectives.

Of course, the whole thing is worth reading. For this post, I just want to touch on the foundational layer that they identify: creating an IT-business partnership.

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“Tech Preview”: Undertow

The Internet of Things is a modern term of art for a relatively old concept (in technology time). The Internet of Things (IoT) is a way of virtualizing physical objects — of making those physical objects under the control of software-based systems.

An IoT environment is predicated on a strong communication design. The various objects need a way to communicate with an end user and (depending on the object and the architecture) with a central system or with other objects. There are different potential mechanisms for that communication, but a very simple and well-vetted method is an embeddable web server.

Like the name implies, this is a web (HTTP) server that is embedded within an application, that the application can use to interact both with external clients (as a typical web service) and with the device itself.

Wilfred Nilson, writing for embedded, the systems development site, had a really great description of an embeddable web server: it is “webbing traditional design.”

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Intro to the Internet of Things

According to a 2014 Forbes article (actually, the autoplay video on the article), 87% of people had never heard the term “the Internet of things.” That has changed rapidly in the last two years (research firm 451 Research pegs 2016 as the year that the Internet of Things goes mainstream). Still, as with many cloud computing concepts, IoT is a vague term.

A Simple Description of the Internet of Things

Consumer-centric devices have emerged over the last forty years, from ATMs to inventory tracking in vending machines. Smart phones were a massive jolt, introducing a new means to connect to and interact with both consumers and physical objects. That networked, digitized environment of physical objects is the Internet of Things. 451 Research had a fantastic term for it: the Internet of things “virtualizes the physical world.”

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Intro to Scalability

Scalability is one of those words that can mean very different things to different people, even in the same context or the same project. It’s not so much nuanced as it is that the definition matters on perspective — scale can be different for different goals.

There will be upcoming posts on data virtualization, in-memory data grids, integration methods — all areas where an understanding of your current and future needs, resourcing, and loads are critical for planning. Going into those concepts, it helps to understand scale — not just “make it bigger,” but how you make it bigger and when and why.

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