Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Beta Availability

The beta release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 (JBoss EAP) is now available. JBoss EAP is Red Hat’s middleware platform, built on open standards and compliant with the Java Enterprise Edition 7 specification. JBoss EAP supports a modular structure that provides service enabling only when required, improving startup speed. Included in this minor release are a broad set of updates to existing features. In addition, the beta release provides new functionality in the areas of security, management, HA, and performance, such as a new additional security framework that unifies security across the entire application server, CLI and web console enhancements, and load balancing profile, respectively. Also included are additions to capabilities related to the simplification of components such as a new additional EJB Client library, HTTP/2 support, and the ability to replace the JSF implementation. With these new capabilities, customers can continue to reduce maintenance time and effort, simplify security, and deliver applications faster and more frequently, all with improved efficiency.

Here are some highlights of the JBoss EAP 7.1 Beta release:

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Beta Availability”

3 ways to effectively prepare for process improvements in your digital journey

In our journey to transform our ways of working, our focus on our customers wishes and our plans to pivot to a digital business there is always a need for process improvement.

While the transformation to a digital business can encompass many aspects that are new to your organization, there are always existing investments in technologies and processes that need to be evaluated.

Some can be modernized and migrated on to the new infrastructure that will support the digital business and others end up remaining in place as legacy systems of record.

One thing is for sure, evaluating existing business processes and looking to improve their effectiveness is going to be a necessary step. With that in mind, here are three ways to effectively prepare for process improvements in your digital journey.

1. Effective BPM theory

The first step in any journey is to plan effectively and gather as much information from the experts as you can. For this step you have many options, but the following example previews the open technology and tooling that will ensure you are ready to tackle process improvements.

2. Inventory existing processes

Identifying the list of existing processes in a business, both automated and non-automated processes will be the next step on the journey.

Businesses have processes in place that might be automated in some form, but showing signs of age or lack of effective execution. Others might have partial automation and exhibit a need for further automation at the time of evaluation. Finally, there can potentially be processes in your business that are crying out for automation and are hindering other processes with their lack of automation.

Collect all this information for evaluation without regard for size, level of automation or making decisions on priority for the next step.

3. Short list processes

Now that you’re able to browse all processes in your organization, identifying the short list where quick wins on process improvements is critical to the project’s success.
Everyone wants to see gains and building momentum with processes that can be improved both quickly and effectively builds confidence. Identify processes that have impact, are visible and can be effectively improved without having major impacts to the existing architecture or business process owner perceptions. This will be different for every organization, but crucial to building success and ensuring a smoother transition on your digital journey.
Armed with these three guidelines you’re ready to effectively prepare for process improvements in your digital journey.

Red Hat Summit 2017 – Planning your JBoss labs

This year in Boston, MA you can attend the Red Hat Summit 2017, the event to get your updates on open source technologies and meet with all the experts you follow throughout the year.

It’s taking place from May 2-4 and is full of interesting sessions, keynotes, and labs.

This year I was part of the process of selecting the labs you are going to experience at Red Hat Summit and wanted to share here some to help you plan your JBoss labs experience. These labs are for you to spend time with the experts who will teach you hands-on how to get the most out of your JBoss middleware products.

Each lab is a 2-hour session, so planning is essential to getting the most out of your days at Red Hat Summit.

As you might be struggling to find and plan your sessions together with some lab time, here is an overview of the labs you can find in the session catalog for exact room and times. Each entry includes the lab number, title, abstract, instructors and is linked to the session catalog entry:

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit 2017 – Planning your JBoss labs”

It’s a great Red Hat day in Minneapolis — Go Microservices !

Cross posted from the Red Hat Events Blog.

It was a great day in Minneapolis! The Microservices with Apache Camel was held at Target Field (inside the ballpark, overlooking the field of play). “Takes a lot to put together an event like this but can certainly be a lot of fun! Go microservices!,” says Red Hat associate Jen Fissel.

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Jen Fissel

I had the privilege of hosting the event and kicked off the event with a reference to the connected world we live in that requires enterprises to be agile while being integrated across the systems of yesterday with the evolving applications of the future. The future of Enterprise IT, containers, are here today and microservices are the stars of the show. Welcome to Minneapolis!

Continue reading “It’s a great Red Hat day in Minneapolis — Go Microservices !”

How to get started with JBoss BPM

If you are evaluating, exploring or just plain interested in learning more about Business Process Management (BPM), then read onwards as this is what you have been waiting for.
While there are quite a few resources online, often they are focused either on community project code that is constantly changing or disjointed in such a manner that it is very difficult for you to find a coherent learning path.
No more.
Just a few months back, in June, the early access program for Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM kicked off. This book is focused on a coherent path of learning to get you started with BPM and it focuses on JBoss BPM Suite as the Open Source BPM solution of choice.
The first chapters have been put online and you can both read along as the book is written, while interacting with the author in the online forums.

Deal of the Day

Today only, half off the price of Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM, so head on over and grab yourself a copy using the code dotd081716au to get started with JBoss BPM Suite.

The deal will go live at Midnight US ET and will stay active for ~48 hours, running a little longer than a day to account for time zone differences.

If you would like to help out with socializing this news, here is a tweet you can cut and paste into your social networks:

 

See more by Eric D. Schabell, contact him on Twitter for comments or visit his home site.

 

How To Import Any JBoss BRMS Example Project

This tips & tricks comes to you after I have been asked the following repeatedly over the last few weeks by users of the JBoss BRMS demos:

“How can I import the projects associated with the various JBoss BRMS demo projects into my own existing installation?”

What this means is that users want to have an example project in their personal installation of the product without using the projects installation process. This is certainly possible but not totally obvious to everyone.

Below I will walk you through how the various example projects for JBoss BRMS are setup, how the actual rules projects are loaded into JBoss BRMS when you set them up and why. After this I will show you how to extract any of the available rules projects for importing in to any previously installed JBoss BRMS server.

Figure 1: In JBoss BRMS open the Administration
perspective with menu options, Authoring -> Administration.

Background on how it works

The normal installation of a JBoss BRMS demo project that I have provided uses a template. This template ensures that the process is always the same; download, unzip, add products and run the installation script. After doing this, you are done, just fire up the JBoss BRMS for the adjusted experience where you open up the Authoring perspective to a pretty process designer with the demo project displayed for you to kick off a demo run.

These projects have a demo template that provides some consistency and you can read about how it works in a previous article.  For the initial installation run of any of these demo projects, a folder is copied from support/brms-demo-niogit to the installation at the location target/jboss-eap-{version}/bin/.niogit. 

Figure 2: To import a new project, open the Clone repository
from the menu Repositories. This will allow you to bring
in any rules project to your JBoss BRMS.

This folder contains all of the project and system Git repositories that are formatted for the version of the project you have downloaded. By installing this directory or complete repository, when JBoss BRMS starts up the first time, it will pick up the state I left it in when designing the experience around you using this demo project.

Get your hands on a specific rules project

The problem I want to help you with in this article is to show you how to extract only the rules project from one of these examples and import this into your own installation of JBoss BRMS.

Figure 3: Cloning a repository is how you import an
existing project, which requires the 
information shown.

The following list is the order you do the tasks, after which I will explain each one:

  1. Download any JBoss BRMS demo project and unzip (or clone it if you like).
  2. Log in to your own JBoss BRMS and open Administration perspective via menu: Authoring -> Administration.
  3. Setup the new rules project you want to import: Repositories -> Clone repository -> fill in details including import project URL
  4. Explore the new project in the Authoring perspective: Authoring -> Project Authoring
I am going to assume you can find a JBoss BRMS demo project of your liking from the link provided in step 1 and download or clone to your local machine.

I will be using the JBoss BRMS Cool Store Demo as the example project you want to import into your current JBoss BRMS installation instead of leveraging the standalone demo project.

In your current installation where you are logged in,  open the Administration perspective as shown in figure 1 by menu options Authoring -> Administration. This allows you to start importing any existing rules project. We will be importing the Cool Store rules project by using the feature to clone existing projects found in menu options, Repositories -> Clone repository as shown in figure 2.

Figure 4: Once the project has been imported (cloned), you
will receive this message in a pop-up.
This will produce a pop-up that asks for some information about the project to be imported, which you can fill in as listed below and shown in figure 3:
  • Repository Name: retail
  • Organizational Unit: Demos    (select whatever org you want to use from your system)
  • Git URL:  file:///[path-to-project-you-downloaded]/brms-coolstore-demo/support/brms-demo-niogit/coolstore-demo.git
Figure 5: Explore your newly imported rules project in the
authoring perspective within your JBoss BRMS installation.

The most interesting bit here is the Git URL, which is normally something hosted online, but this project we want to import is positioned locally in our filesystem, so we use a file based URL to point to it. Click on Clone button to import the project and you should see a pop-up that looks like figure 4 stating that you have successfully imported your project.

Now you can explore the new imported project in your authoring perspective and proceed as you desire with this project as shown in figure 5. This will work for any project I have put together for the field that is based on the standard template I use.

I hope this tips & tricks helps you to explore and enjoy as many of the existing rules examples offered in the current collection of demo projects.

 

See more by Eric D. Schabell, contact him on Twitter for comments or visit his home site.

And the Winner Is…

The comparison between the bag of cash representing a MINI Cooper S and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 is kind of fun. JBoss EAP 7 — like a MINI Cooper S — is small, agile, fast, and fits easily in appropriately-sized containers.

car

As part of this year’s Red Hat Summit — and to celebrate the release of JBOss EAP 7 — the Red Hat Middleware group held a drawing for a (metaphorical) bagful of cash equal to the value of a 2016 MINI Cooper S ($24,950 as of June 1, 2016). Anyone at Summit (who is not a Red Hat employee or relative) could enter the drawing.

And the drawing was last night! The winner is … drumroll ….

RYAN THAMES.

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Congratulations, Ryan!

Thank you to everyone who participated and who has visited the booth so far during Summit. It has been quite a ride this week.

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Left to right, Craig Muzilla, senior vice president of Application Platforms Business; Ryan Thames (winner); and Mark Little, CTO of JBoss middleware.

For reference….

The terms and conditions for this contest are available at https://www.redhat.com/files/resources/car-giveaway-contest-terms-conditions.pdf.

Mike Piech and Rich Sharples on Facebook LIVE from Red Hat Summit

Rich Sharples, senior director of product management, and Mike Piech, vice president of marketing, got together for a half hour at the end of the Summit day today to discuss some of the major issues that have come out related to middleware this week. There have been some major announcements: the new microprofile project, the release of Red Hat JBoss EAP 7, the growth of microservices, and the recent acquisition of 3scale and what that means for API management in Red Hat Middleware.

As a quick summary, two of the major themes underscoring a lot of the announcements around JBoss, middleware, and Java this week relate to things that are micro: microservices and microprofile.

Microservices has been a subtext in many of the JBoss EAP 7 sessions and in the OpenShift sessions because this containerized, immutable, consistent environment is what makes microservices possible.Containers fundamentally enable microservices. You have an underlying runtime that is commensurate with the idea of “micro.” You can scale elastically, add instances to scale up and down. The opportunity to change things as an application travels from the desktop to the data center is much less. These are communicating systems, and that’s what container orchestration is. It coordinates these complex webs. we’re The application is the only thing that matters. Operations is there to support the application. I hit a build button and it goes through my CI/CD system, and it’s the same configuration in the environment.

However, like any application or project architecture, it’s more than “JBoss + OpenShift  = awesome microservices.” There has to be consideration and weight given to the application and the underlying technology to find a structure that fits. Microservices architecture isn’t about taking everything you’ve got and decomposing it into atomic services. It’s about having a range of sizes and services, depending on what you need. It is important to be conscious of the trade-offs that come from the increased complexity of the system. It really depends on the organization and the technology platforms they have what architecture is appropriate.

That need to understand and define the underlying framework to do microservices effectively is the theme of the second topic: the microprofile. There are defined specifications for different Java platforms (Standard and Enterprise) but both have the assumption of large-scale, full server architectures. New wave development, though, is increasingly small, with small services in those larger complex systems. What Java EE introduced to development was consistency and dependability. As we move into a new containerized world, we must do it responsibly, preserving the consistency and stability of previous environments. The microprofile project was created because a lot of vendors – Red Hat, IBM. Tomitribe, Payara – were just on a Slack chat, discussing what they needed to do for microservices and ways they could implement it. And then there was a lightbulb: maybe there’s something here. This is a chance to bring the whole Java community around a new architecture, with the strengths and discipline they’ve already developed.

Watch the whole video. For microprofile, you can join the Google group or check out the microprofile site for more information and emerging discussions.

Red Hat Summit: Tuesday Recap

redhat-sign

Tuesday was the first official day of Red Hat Summit. (DevNation started on Monday.) There is a lot going on in middleware, down a lot of different tracks — application development, business automation, integration. Tuesday had an overall focus on containers; for middleware, that means that most of the sessions related to Red Hat Enterprise Application Platform 7 and how it works in cloud and container environments.

Don’t forget to check the Middelware Guide to Loving Summit for session highlights for each day and for social media channels to watch for live tweeting and general commentary.

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit: Tuesday Recap”

Red Hat Summit: Monday Recap

Yesterday was an incredibly exciting day at the DevNation general session. Two major things occurred (out of half a dozen things) related to middleware at Red Hat:

I summarized those two announcements with some thoughts on how they show the evolution and resilience of Java on LinkedIn. Read the whole thing, as they say.

Other highlights from Monday’s DevNation:

There’s a new photo album on the Middleware Facebook page, too, capturing a lot of moments from this week.

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