Introducing OpenShift Application Runtimes Public Beta

Executive Summary

  • Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes is now in public beta, meaning you can try it!
  • Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes includes a collection of supported application runtimes.
  • Each runtime is designed to simplify cloud-native development by using Red Hat OpenShift capabilities in a manner natural to the language runtime.
  • Try it! Go to developers.redhat.com/rhoar. Choose an example and runtime, and watch it get forked to your github account and deployed to OpenShift. Feedback welcome on StackOverflow.

Continue reading “Introducing OpenShift Application Runtimes Public Beta”

Integrating SOAP based Web Services into Red Hat 3scale API Management

In Red Hat 3scale API Management, we can manage any HTTP(S)-based APIs – including REST and SOAP. With REST, it is particularly straightforward as individual URL paths usually map quite nicely to operations. By operations, we mean fine-grained tasks and services which providers may wish to  a) get visibility into and b) apply control access to.

With SOAP, there is more of a challenge, as it is typical for multiple operations to share the same endpoint. Yet providers may still want to get the same visibility and control they get with SOAP as they get with REST.

Continue reading “Integrating SOAP based Web Services into Red Hat 3scale API Management”

3 ways to effectively prepare for process improvements in your digital journey

In our journey to transform our ways of working, our focus on our customers wishes and our plans to pivot to a digital business there is always a need for process improvement.

While the transformation to a digital business can encompass many aspects that are new to your organization, there are always existing investments in technologies and processes that need to be evaluated.

Some can be modernized and migrated on to the new infrastructure that will support the digital business and others end up remaining in place as legacy systems of record.

One thing is for sure, evaluating existing business processes and looking to improve their effectiveness is going to be a necessary step. With that in mind, here are three ways to effectively prepare for process improvements in your digital journey.

1. Effective BPM theory

The first step in any journey is to plan effectively and gather as much information from the experts as you can. For this step you have many options, but the following example previews the open technology and tooling that will ensure you are ready to tackle process improvements.

2. Inventory existing processes

Identifying the list of existing processes in a business, both automated and non-automated processes will be the next step on the journey.

Businesses have processes in place that might be automated in some form, but showing signs of age or lack of effective execution. Others might have partial automation and exhibit a need for further automation at the time of evaluation. Finally, there can potentially be processes in your business that are crying out for automation and are hindering other processes with their lack of automation.

Collect all this information for evaluation without regard for size, level of automation or making decisions on priority for the next step.

3. Short list processes

Now that you’re able to browse all processes in your organization, identifying the short list where quick wins on process improvements is critical to the project’s success.
Everyone wants to see gains and building momentum with processes that can be improved both quickly and effectively builds confidence. Identify processes that have impact, are visible and can be effectively improved without having major impacts to the existing architecture or business process owner perceptions. This will be different for every organization, but crucial to building success and ensuring a smoother transition on your digital journey.
Armed with these three guidelines you’re ready to effectively prepare for process improvements in your digital journey.

Announcing the Alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Today Red Hat announced the alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). This is the first of many articles on the subject that will be published on the JBoss Middleware blog.

So what is RHOAR?

RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform. Specifically, the following application runtimes will be included in RHOAR:

  • Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) – existing Java EE / Spring apps.
  • WildFly Swarm running MicroProfile – Java EE centric MSA
  • Spring Boot / Cloud – Spring centric MSA
  • Vert.x – greenfield reactive Java
  • Node.js – greenfield reactive JavaScript

Continue reading “Announcing the Alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes”

Go Anywhere API Management: 3scale API Management adds a Fully Containerized On-Premises Version

Today is a special day for the 3scale team at Red Hat. It’s been just 10 short months since the company joined Red Hat in the summer of last year and there has been a buzz of activity for the entire time.

One of the biggest new goals was to add a fully on premise version of the 3scale API Management product to the line up alongside the existing Software as a Service (SaaS) version. Hence the team is very happy to announce the availability of that new version which is now generally available. Get started looking at 3scale’s customer portal page.

Launching the on-premise version is special for two reasons. First, because increasing numbers of customers are now running large numbers of public and private APIs – often deep in their internal infrastructure. Deploying API Management in their own data center or in a cloud environment they own is often a key part of succeeding. Second, it is special because of the way on-premise is being delivered. Specifically the new product is shipping entirely on Red Hat’s powerful container management platform, OpenShift.

Continue reading “Go Anywhere API Management: 3scale API Management adds a Fully Containerized On-Premises Version”

Red Hat Summit 2017 – Planning your JBoss labs

This year in Boston, MA you can attend the Red Hat Summit 2017, the event to get your updates on open source technologies and meet with all the experts you follow throughout the year.

It’s taking place from May 2-4 and is full of interesting sessions, keynotes, and labs.

This year I was part of the process of selecting the labs you are going to experience at Red Hat Summit and wanted to share here some to help you plan your JBoss labs experience. These labs are for you to spend time with the experts who will teach you hands-on how to get the most out of your JBoss middleware products.

Each lab is a 2-hour session, so planning is essential to getting the most out of your days at Red Hat Summit.

As you might be struggling to find and plan your sessions together with some lab time, here is an overview of the labs you can find in the session catalog for exact room and times. Each entry includes the lab number, title, abstract, instructors and is linked to the session catalog entry:

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Enhanced containerized integration services on OpenShift: Red Hat JBoss Fuse Integration Services

Updated and enhanced integration services are now available on Red Hat OpenShift. A containerized, formatted version of Red Hat JBoss Fuse 6.3 is now available for simplified deployments on OpenShift instances.

Technology is shifting so rapidly — from cloud-based architectures, Internet of Things and a variety of devices for interaction, new data streams, and mobile apps, to name a few — that organizations have to be able to create and deploy applications and process data quickly. Traditional, monolithic systems and top-heavy ESB-style integration approaches tend to be too slow and rigid to enable this level rapid innovation.

That is where an agile integration framework like JBoss Fuse can be a foundational element in your IT and digital strategy. Agile integration has three core capabilities: distributed integration, containers, and an API-based architecture.

  1. JBoss Fuse uses the lightweight distributed integration patterns of the underlying Apache Camel project.
  2. As part of the JBoss middleware services on OpenShift, JBoss Fuse is available for rapid deployment within container and cloud environments. Red Hat OpenShift is based on Docker and Kubernetes. Container architectures allow developers to build and integrate traditional and microservices-based applications at scale quickly.
  3. JBoss Fuse can be used together with Red Hat 3scale API Management Platform as an engine to develop and deploy APIs, both internally to development groups and externally for customer and partner ecosystems.

Integration technologies help organizations build on their existing infrastructures even as they pivot to new cloud-based and service-based architectures.

Features (and Benefits) at a Glance

  • Spring Boot support
  • Custom-developed, containerized applications based on Apache Camel 2.18
  • Integration with Hystrix and Zipkin microservices frameworks
  • An optimized integration environment for microservices applications on Red Hat OpenShift
  • Path to transition off existing Apache Karaf-based applications to cloud architectures
  • Consistent hybrid integration platform across their enterprise

More Information

Architecture, Process, Platform

Digital transformation is a hot topic in enterprises these days, and like any such topic it’s associated with a wide range of use, overuse, and misuse. But the phrase does get at something that we can all sense is really going on, a truly profound change. As different businesses undergo or undertake variants of digital transformation, we see a number of common characteristics of the more digital world:

  • More things happen (or are expected to happen) in real time
  • More different sources and kinds of data are brought together
  • Activities are more decentralized and ad hoc
  • There is a broadening of participation in both the building and the use of I.T.
  • There is a shift from analysis and planning to trial-and-error experimentation

Each of those ideas deserves elaboration–topics for future blogs–but going for the moment with whatever came to mind for those bullets as a rough characterization of digital transformation, let’s explore the interplay of architecture, process, and platform in helping enterprises compete and succeed in this emerging digital world.

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Bringing Containerized Services and DevOps Closer to (Your) Reality

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For more than 10 years, Red Hat JBoss Middleware has been a successful business that deeply represented the Red Hat DNA: open source software. We expanded our product portfolio with projects created and imagined by the open source community; we decided to support other projects with contributors; and we also opened the source of technologies we acquired. Somewhere along the way, Linux containers, Kubernetes, and docker happened which made us realize that containerization of applications is the base for your next 20 years. The caveat in this is that a platform is only as important as the applications you run on top of it. In other words, a platform not running applications is not realizing its value. With that in mind, we made an important decision and investment to evolve our application portfolio in similar ways that we ask our customers to do to theirs: let’s take our Red Hat JBoss Middleware products, commonly deployed on Linux and Windows machines, and make them available as containerized deployments.

With the announcement of the availability of JBoss Data Virtualization for OpenShift we now have 100 percent of our Red Hat JBoss Middleware runtime portfolio containerized and available in Red Hat OpenShift, an enterprise-ready Kubernetes distribution with value-added capabilities that go from deploying your already packaged container images, to delivering a DevOps pipeline for an iterative development process.

Continue reading “Bringing Containerized Services and DevOps Closer to (Your) Reality”

Containerizing an application for the cloud: A journey of settings, state, and security.

Red Hat Developers and author N. Harrison Ripps have just begun releasing a ten-part series in which Harrison describes the process of deploying an application using containers into a clustered environment on the cloud.

Using the ZRC IRC client as a sample application, Harrison demonstrates each step in the process of containerizing software, dealing with issues like statelessness, security, and robustness that are typically architectural hurdles for most development teams moving to a cloud infrastructure.

Parameterizing application settings is a common requirement of applications that end up deploying to any environment, and containers have only heightened this need — with the emergence of on-demand environments, scriptability and configurability of the application images being deployed is a must.

Harrison suggests that containerizing applications should happen later, while development should happen first. This might seem intuitive, but his point is that containerizing an application actually need not introduce many development-time changes that would affect the architecture of your system — it can, but it need not. For a small sacrifice of startup performance, container images can be made more configurable and flexible, supporting DevOps procedures and deployments.

Once configured, the series also demonstrates how to host the application on a private instance of the OpenShift Container Platform, including clustering, via either the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), or binary download of OpenShift. Harrison goes step-by-step through the process of starting the private cloud, deploying the application, and using Kubernetes to cluster the application.

Using attached storage, Harrison introduces a window of statefulness into our container environment. This produces an application that runs on the cloud in stateless containers, but maintains its internal state throughout the lifecycle as pods are brought up and down.

Follow along and learn some of these core cloud concepts as the series is published:

Title Date
That app you love, part 1: Making a connection 2016/09/27
That app you love, part 2: Immutable but flexible – What settings matter? 2016/09/29
That app you love, part 3: Every setting in its place 2016/10/04
That app you love, part 4: Designing a config-and-run container 2016/10/06
That app you love, part 5: Upping our (cloud) game 2016/10/11
That app you love, part 6: Container, meet cloud 2016/10/13
That app you love, part 7: Wired for sound 2016/10/18
That app you love, part 8: A blueprint for “that app you love” 2016/10/20
That app you love, part 9: Storage and statefulness 2016/10/25
That app you love, part 10: Long live “that app you love” 2016/10/27
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