Introducing OpenShift Application Runtimes Public Beta

Executive Summary

  • Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes is now in public beta, meaning you can try it!
  • Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes includes a collection of supported application runtimes.
  • Each runtime is designed to simplify cloud-native development by using Red Hat OpenShift capabilities in a manner natural to the language runtime.
  • Try it! Go to developers.redhat.com/rhoar. Choose an example and runtime, and watch it get forked to your github account and deployed to OpenShift. Feedback welcome on StackOverflow.

Continue reading “Introducing OpenShift Application Runtimes Public Beta”

Red Hat Summit 2017 – Planning your JBoss labs

This year in Boston, MA you can attend the Red Hat Summit 2017, the event to get your updates on open source technologies and meet with all the experts you follow throughout the year.

It’s taking place from May 2-4 and is full of interesting sessions, keynotes, and labs.

This year I was part of the process of selecting the labs you are going to experience at Red Hat Summit and wanted to share here some to help you plan your JBoss labs experience. These labs are for you to spend time with the experts who will teach you hands-on how to get the most out of your JBoss middleware products.

Each lab is a 2-hour session, so planning is essential to getting the most out of your days at Red Hat Summit.

As you might be struggling to find and plan your sessions together with some lab time, here is an overview of the labs you can find in the session catalog for exact room and times. Each entry includes the lab number, title, abstract, instructors and is linked to the session catalog entry:

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit 2017 – Planning your JBoss labs”

How to integrate business logic in processes with JBoss BPM

In June 2016 the Manning Early Access Program (MEAP) started for the book Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM.

What is a MEAP?

The Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM MEAP gives you full access to read chapters as they are written, get the finished eBook as soon as it’s ready, and receive the paper book long before it’s in bookstores.

You can also interact with the author, that’s me, on the forums to provided feedback as the book is being written. So come on over and get started today with Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM.

The way the MEAP works is that every month or so Manning puts a new chapter online. As of this week chapter 5 is available and those already in the MEAP will have access to start reading the chapter.

This is a large chapter and it is one of the harder topics to confine to a single chapter. I do expect to split this chapter up in the future so that you have the basics and then more advanced topics regarding learning to effectively implement your business logic with JBoss BPM.

To give you an idea of what’s available so far:

You can read this excerpt online before you decide, but I look forward to hearing from you on the content and stay tuned for more.

 

See more by Eric D. Schabell, contact him on Twitter for comments or visit his home site.

Containerizing an application for the cloud: A journey of settings, state, and security.

Red Hat Developers and author N. Harrison Ripps have just begun releasing a ten-part series in which Harrison describes the process of deploying an application using containers into a clustered environment on the cloud.

Using the ZRC IRC client as a sample application, Harrison demonstrates each step in the process of containerizing software, dealing with issues like statelessness, security, and robustness that are typically architectural hurdles for most development teams moving to a cloud infrastructure.

Parameterizing application settings is a common requirement of applications that end up deploying to any environment, and containers have only heightened this need — with the emergence of on-demand environments, scriptability and configurability of the application images being deployed is a must.

Harrison suggests that containerizing applications should happen later, while development should happen first. This might seem intuitive, but his point is that containerizing an application actually need not introduce many development-time changes that would affect the architecture of your system — it can, but it need not. For a small sacrifice of startup performance, container images can be made more configurable and flexible, supporting DevOps procedures and deployments.

Once configured, the series also demonstrates how to host the application on a private instance of the OpenShift Container Platform, including clustering, via either the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), or binary download of OpenShift. Harrison goes step-by-step through the process of starting the private cloud, deploying the application, and using Kubernetes to cluster the application.

Using attached storage, Harrison introduces a window of statefulness into our container environment. This produces an application that runs on the cloud in stateless containers, but maintains its internal state throughout the lifecycle as pods are brought up and down.

Follow along and learn some of these core cloud concepts as the series is published:

Title Date
That app you love, part 1: Making a connection 2016/09/27
That app you love, part 2: Immutable but flexible – What settings matter? 2016/09/29
That app you love, part 3: Every setting in its place 2016/10/04
That app you love, part 4: Designing a config-and-run container 2016/10/06
That app you love, part 5: Upping our (cloud) game 2016/10/11
That app you love, part 6: Container, meet cloud 2016/10/13
That app you love, part 7: Wired for sound 2016/10/18
That app you love, part 8: A blueprint for “that app you love” 2016/10/20
That app you love, part 9: Storage and statefulness 2016/10/25
That app you love, part 10: Long live “that app you love” 2016/10/27