And the Winner Is…

The comparison between the bag of cash representing a MINI Cooper S and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 is kind of fun. JBoss EAP 7 — like a MINI Cooper S — is small, agile, fast, and fits easily in appropriately-sized containers.

car

As part of this year’s Red Hat Summit — and to celebrate the release of JBOss EAP 7 — the Red Hat Middleware group held a drawing for a (metaphorical) bagful of cash equal to the value of a 2016 MINI Cooper S ($24,950 as of June 1, 2016). Anyone at Summit (who is not a Red Hat employee or relative) could enter the drawing.

And the drawing was last night! The winner is … drumroll ….

RYAN THAMES.

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Congratulations, Ryan!

Thank you to everyone who participated and who has visited the booth so far during Summit. It has been quite a ride this week.

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Left to right, Craig Muzilla, senior vice president of Application Platforms Business; Ryan Thames (winner); and Mark Little, CTO of JBoss middleware.

For reference….

The terms and conditions for this contest are available at https://www.redhat.com/files/resources/car-giveaway-contest-terms-conditions.pdf.

Mike Piech and Rich Sharples on Facebook LIVE from Red Hat Summit

Rich Sharples, senior director of product management, and Mike Piech, vice president of marketing, got together for a half hour at the end of the Summit day today to discuss some of the major issues that have come out related to middleware this week. There have been some major announcements: the new microprofile project, the release of Red Hat JBoss EAP 7, the growth of microservices, and the recent acquisition of 3scale and what that means for API management in Red Hat Middleware.

As a quick summary, two of the major themes underscoring a lot of the announcements around JBoss, middleware, and Java this week relate to things that are micro: microservices and microprofile.

Microservices has been a subtext in many of the JBoss EAP 7 sessions and in the OpenShift sessions because this containerized, immutable, consistent environment is what makes microservices possible.Containers fundamentally enable microservices. You have an underlying runtime that is commensurate with the idea of “micro.” You can scale elastically, add instances to scale up and down. The opportunity to change things as an application travels from the desktop to the data center is much less. These are communicating systems, and that’s what container orchestration is. It coordinates these complex webs. we’re The application is the only thing that matters. Operations is there to support the application. I hit a build button and it goes through my CI/CD system, and it’s the same configuration in the environment.

However, like any application or project architecture, it’s more than “JBoss + OpenShift  = awesome microservices.” There has to be consideration and weight given to the application and the underlying technology to find a structure that fits. Microservices architecture isn’t about taking everything you’ve got and decomposing it into atomic services. It’s about having a range of sizes and services, depending on what you need. It is important to be conscious of the trade-offs that come from the increased complexity of the system. It really depends on the organization and the technology platforms they have what architecture is appropriate.

That need to understand and define the underlying framework to do microservices effectively is the theme of the second topic: the microprofile. There are defined specifications for different Java platforms (Standard and Enterprise) but both have the assumption of large-scale, full server architectures. New wave development, though, is increasingly small, with small services in those larger complex systems. What Java EE introduced to development was consistency and dependability. As we move into a new containerized world, we must do it responsibly, preserving the consistency and stability of previous environments. The microprofile project was created because a lot of vendors – Red Hat, IBM. Tomitribe, Payara – were just on a Slack chat, discussing what they needed to do for microservices and ways they could implement it. And then there was a lightbulb: maybe there’s something here. This is a chance to bring the whole Java community around a new architecture, with the strengths and discipline they’ve already developed.

Watch the whole video. For microprofile, you can join the Google group or check out the microprofile site for more information and emerging discussions.

Red Hat Summit Preview – Discovery session series

When we go to the Red Hat Summit this year in San Francisco, we have planned to attend sessions, labs, evening events and even maybe a few good seafood restaurants. Little did you know that there is a gem you might want to fit into your busy schedule, as it is a chance to meet some of the rock stars that are backing the  Red Hat Open Innovation Labs.

There will be a series of sessions hosted by experts to showcase use of Red Hat technologies and demonstrate the best practices with interactive white boarding. That is a personal touch session where you can interact with the storytellers and will be taking place in the West Lobby of M0scone Center on level 2.

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit Preview – Discovery session series”

App Dev Cloud Stack – Open interoperability critical to success

This series started with the statement, what do you mean by “Can’t ignore the stack anymore?”

When your background is application development, you have spent many hours, days and years perfecting your craft. You have not only mastered languages and concepts, you have made it a point to learn to make good architectural decisions when pulling together the applications you develop.

The problem is, we tend to ignore the stack we are working on as much as we can. Well it’s time that we as application developers broadened our horizons a bit, expanding our understanding of the stack we work on with the introduction of Cloud, Platform As A Service (PaaS) and containers to our toolboxes.

Our tour of your Cloud stack continues, from our previous article in this series where we talked about our PaaS interface for our application delivery, onto how open interoperability is critical to the success of our Cloud stack.

Continue reading “App Dev Cloud Stack – Open interoperability critical to success”

Containers, cloud, and Java apps: A new video on development stacks

DevOps methodologies are core to a (modern) IT environment because they focus on strategic business demands: resilient design, rapid scale, and reliable service delivery. That last characteristic is the critical for effective DevOps environments.

The goal is for you to move through the total dev stack, as fast as your development team can code. Our new video shows how a Java app goes from being developed on an OpenShift container to launching on a production cloud instance in under five minutes.

Continue reading “Containers, cloud, and Java apps: A new video on development stacks”

Red Hat announces availability of containerized middleware capabilities on OpenShift

A little more than two years ago, we announced Red Hat’s “xPaaS” initiative to provide Red Hat JBoss Middleware on OpenShift and introduce a new way of building and deploying enterprise applications. Our efforts in executing against that vision and roadmap have entailed a lot of work and have been very exciting.

Continue reading “Red Hat announces availability of containerized middleware capabilities on OpenShift”

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