Java EE moves to Eclipse

If you’ve been following the news about Oracle’s new direction for Java EE, you’ll know that one of the motivations for changing the governance and process is to move Java EE forward in a more agile and responsive manner.

So it’s a good sign that within a month of initially  announcing their intentions, Oracle (with help from IBM and Red Hat) have chosen the Eclipse Foundation as the future home for Java EE. You can read Oracle’s announcement here.

This is a pretty important, first, tangible step in moving Enterprise Java forward and it’s encouraging to see Oracle moving ahead at a rapid pace. Java EE is an established technology that many organizations depend on for their business critical applications. Java EE is also a large body of work with Technology Specifications, Reference Implementations and TCKs from multiple vendors and open source projects so there’s still a significant amount of work yet to happen – but this is a great start.

Oracle’s announcement to move Java EE to an Open Source foundation has already begun to energize the community, offering the opportunity to more quickly evolve the platform to meet modern workloads. The Eclipse Foundation will be significant enabler in that evolution and Red Hat fully supports Oracle’s decision. Eclipse already hosts many projects of a similar size and complexity as Java EE, and we’re confident that the many years of experience and expertise the Eclipse Foundation has with other Java technologies ensures that this will be a successful move.

MicroProfile is also an Eclipse Foundation project and Red Hat hopes this will make it easier to align Java EE and MicroProfile in the future. The MicroProfile project was started in June 2016 as a collaboration between Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, Payara and others in the Java community with the goal of making Enterprise Java more relevant to developers building cloud-native applications.

Red Hat is an Eclipse Foundation member and has worked with the Eclipse Foundation for many years on projects as diverse as JBossTools, IoT, Kapua, Vert.x and Che and we look forward to working with with Oracle, IBM, The Eclipse Foundation and others on the future of Java EE.

The future of Java EE

At this stage the future of Java EE looks brighter than it has for quite a while as Oracle, working with Red Hat, IBM, other vendors and the wider community to move the specifications, TCKs and overall innovation to an open source foundation. I think in general most people in the Java community see this as positive but there are a few naysayers, even more of them in other non-JVM areas. The common thread throughout is along the lines of “who cares these days?” or “it’s far quicker and easier to accomplish the same things with framework X or language Y, anyway.” I’m not going to try to address all of the concerns which have been raised because many of the comments I’ve seen have clearly been subjective and bordering on click bait. However, I’m writing this piece to reiterate some things I’ve said over the years and which remain just as relevant today, in my opinion

I want to start though by saying that in all of this I am trying to remain objective. Of course in my current role I and Red Hat have a vested interest in Java EE but if you’ve known me long enough over the years you’ll know that I’m also a scientist and as such I base my opinions on observations and facts born out by those observations. If a fact or piece of data goes against a theory then I don’t ignore it, I review and likely update or replace the theory to match the facts. I’ve changed my opinion on many things throughout my career and I’m sure I will do so again.

OK so back to Java EE. Does this move to open source help the wider community? Is Java EE still relevant or has it had its day like so many technologies before it? I’m not going to link to other things I’ve written on Java EE and its future over the years as they’re easily searchable through your favourite engine. But in short, many people forget that Java EE represents an evolution of essential middleware capabilities which many mission critical applications require. It’s had a lot of bad press since its inception, some of it accurate and some of it less so. I think one of its big failings is that, like my favourite topic of transactions, it has been used and misused in environments where it wasn’t really appropriate. No stack or framework is going to be applicable to every problem space and of course developers are going to get frustrated if they try it and find it wanting and failing as a result.

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Red Hat JBoss Fuse a Certified Enterprise Integration Solution for SAP

We are pleased to announce that Red Hat JBoss Fuse has recently completed the SAP certification process for BOR API Certification and Red Hat JBoss Fuse is now a SAP certified solution.

Red Hat JBoss Fuse is an open source, lightweight enterprise service bus (ESB). It delivers a robust, cost-effective, and modular integration platform that lets enterprises easily connect their disparate applications, services, or devices in real time. An integrated enterprise is able to provide better products and innovative services to its customers. A flexible architecture coupled with popular and proven integration tools enables Red Hat JBoss Fuse to integrate everything, everywhere.

Red Hat JBoss Fuse provides a certified enterprise integration solution with SAP, enabling Camel routes running in JBoss Fuse to retrieve all business objects from the SAP business object repository (BOR), the metadata and documentation of their business application programming interfaces (BAPIs), and to invoke all the methods of a BAPI. In addition it provides a certified solution for invoking non-BAPI remote function modules (RFMs). The performance of Red Hat JBoss Fuse is certified to maintain multiple connections to SAP, handle the transfer of large amounts of data and to handle multiple concurrent calls to BAPI methods. In addition, Red Hat JBoss Fuse is certified to properly process any Unicode characters passed in remote function calls.

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Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 Beta Availability

The beta release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 (JBoss EAP) is now available. JBoss EAP is Red Hat’s middleware platform, built on open standards and compliant with the Java Enterprise Edition 7 specification. JBoss EAP supports a modular structure that provides service enabling only when required, improving startup speed. Included in this minor release are a broad set of updates to existing features. In addition, the beta release provides new functionality in the areas of security, management, HA, and performance, such as a new additional security framework that unifies security across the entire application server, CLI and web console enhancements, and load balancing profile, respectively. Also included are additions to capabilities related to the simplification of components such as a new additional EJB Client library, HTTP/2 support, and the ability to replace the JSF implementation. With these new capabilities, customers can continue to reduce maintenance time and effort, simplify security, and deliver applications faster and more frequently, all with improved efficiency.

Here are some highlights of the JBoss EAP 7.1 Beta release:

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Performance, scale, and real-time analytics: Red Hat JBoss Data Grid 7.1

I am excited to announce the general availability of Red Hat JBoss Data Grid 7.1!  This is the only Red Hat software ranked highly in two separate Forrester waves categories: In-Memory Data Grid and In-Memory Database. On top of that, no other vendor offers any unified in-memory data management solution that is recognized in both waves — JBoss Data Grid is the one product with the versatility to span both categories.

In-memory computing is all about high performance and scale-out architecture. The primary focus of this release to enhance the performance of JBoss Data Grid as an in-memory data management platform for hybrid transactional and analytical (HTAP) workloads.

New Capabilities and Features

  • Performance improvements. JBoss Data Grid 7.1 features core performance improvements, especially in clustered write operations. Current tests have shown up to 60% increase in write throughput under load. (We have modified various default settings to improve JBoss Data Grid performance.)
  • Elastic scale external state management for JBoss Web Server (Tomcat) and Spring applications (on-premise or cloud/Openshift). JBoss Data Grid 7.1 features the ability to externalize HTTP sessions from a JBoss Web Server node to a remote JBoss Data Grid cluster. This helps make the JBoss Web layer stateless and enables a rolling update of the application layer, while retrieving the session data from the JBoss Data Grid layer. Additionally, JBoss Data Grid 7.1 features Spring session support, which enables you to externalize HTTP session from a Spring (or Spring Boot) deployment to a remote JBoss Data Grid cluster.
  • Real-time analytics, through Apache Spark 2.x integration supporting RDD and DStream interfaces.
  • New string-based querying with Ickle (tech preview). JBoss Data Grid 7.1 introduces a new string-based querying language, Ickle, as technology preview,  which enables you to specify combinations of relational and full-text predicates (based on Apache Lucene). This enhances the querying feature-set available in client-server mode by bringing several additional operations that were previously available only in library mode.
  • Ease of administration. Update and save node-level configurations are now available through the administration console.
  • Feature enhancements to Hot Rod clients, including streaming large-sized objects in chunks from the JBoss Data Grid server to a Java client and adding cross-site failover for C++, C# and Node.js clients.

More Resources

Vert.x for reactive programming in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Have you read the announcement of the alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR)? We also posted an introduction to the component in RHOAR earlier.

One of the curated runtimes included with RHOAR is Vert.x. Vert.x is an open source toolkit for building reactive, high concurrency, low latency applications and is well-suited for supporting the asynchronous communications required by a microservices architecture.

Vert.x is distributed as a toolkit for building reactive applications on the Java virtual machine (JVM). There are a three important points in this description: toolkit, reactive and “on the JVM.”

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Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes + JBoss EAP for fast, lightweight, Java EE cloud applications

Have you read the announcement of the alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR)? We also posted an introduction to the component in RHOAR earlier.

Red Hat Intends to include entitlements for the JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) as part of a Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) subscription.  The reasoning for this is dead simple, there is still strong demand for a Java application platform the implements the Java EE specification. JBoss EAP 7 fits that requirements with certified full platform and web profile support for the Java EE 7 specification. Best of all, JBoss EAP offers Java EE 7 capabilities in a small, fast, cloud ready footprint. It has been available on the OpenShift Cloud Platform (OCP) since version 6. JBoss EAP is cloud ready and deserves to be included as a RHOAR component.

I want to believe. Prove that JBoss is small and fast!

First lets agree on what a Java EE application platform is. I propose a minimalist definition. That being, a Java EE application platform is verified to have implemented a specific Java EE specification. The current Java EE 7 specification is extensive and runs 290 pages long. Implementing the details is no trivial task. As of the date of this article, there are eight products that have been verified by Oracle to be Java EE 7 full platform compatible implementations. Red Hat JBoss EAP 7 is one of those products. However, Apache Tomcat, JBoss Web Server, and Pivotal tcServer are not on the list. Those products are not Java EE application platforms.

Continue reading “Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes + JBoss EAP for fast, lightweight, Java EE cloud applications”

Announcing the Alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Today Red Hat announced the alpha release of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). This is the first of many articles on the subject that will be published on the JBoss Middleware blog.

So what is RHOAR?

RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform. Specifically, the following application runtimes will be included in RHOAR:

  • Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) – existing Java EE / Spring apps.
  • WildFly Swarm running MicroProfile – Java EE centric MSA
  • Spring Boot / Cloud – Spring centric MSA
  • Vert.x – greenfield reactive Java
  • Node.js – greenfield reactive JavaScript

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Reactive architecture for hybrid cloud environments: Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7 is now available

Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7, now available, introduces a new reactive architecture, with an enhanced broker, a new interconnect router, and expanded client support. This new architecture is more responsive and increases both throughput and performance for messaging services.

The JBoss AMQ broker, based on Apache ActiveMQ Artemis, manages connections, queues, topics, and subscriptions. Using innovations from Artemis, the broker has an asynchronous internal architecture, which can increase performance and scalability and enable it to handle more concurrent connections and achieve greater message throughput. Additionally, the high availability topology for AMQ has been redesigned for a “share nothing” architecture — this removes the need for a centralized database or storage location and uses a distributed, highly available topology instead.

The new interconnect router allows unrestricted redundancy. The router automatically reroutes messaging traffic between data centers, cloud services, and geographic locations. As with the broker’s distributed data topology, the interconnect router is the core for distributed messaging services, which allows operations to have redundant, secure, and reliable connectivity and to optimize messaging between services.

JBoss AMQ 7 expands its support of popular messaging APIs and protocols by adding new client libraries (on top of its existing MQTT and AMQP support):

  • Java Message Service (JMS) 2.0
  • JavaScript
  • C++
  • .NET
  • Python

By creating a more distributed topology and broad protocol and language support, JBoss AMQ is a more reactive messaging platform and can support dynamic microservices and other application architectures.

JBoss AMQ is a lightweight, standards-based open source messaging platform designed to enable real-time communication between different applications, services, devices, and the Internet of Things (IoT). It also serves as the messaging foundation for Red Hat JBoss Fuse, Red Hat’s lightweight, flexible integration platform, and is designed to provide the real-time, distributed messaging capabilities needed to support an agile integration approach for modern application development.

Additional resources

Go Anywhere API Management: 3scale API Management adds a Fully Containerized On-Premises Version

Today is a special day for the 3scale team at Red Hat. It’s been just 10 short months since the company joined Red Hat in the summer of last year and there has been a buzz of activity for the entire time.

One of the biggest new goals was to add a fully on premise version of the 3scale API Management product to the line up alongside the existing Software as a Service (SaaS) version. Hence the team is very happy to announce the availability of that new version which is now generally available. Get started looking at 3scale’s customer portal page.

Launching the on-premise version is special for two reasons. First, because increasing numbers of customers are now running large numbers of public and private APIs – often deep in their internal infrastructure. Deploying API Management in their own data center or in a cloud environment they own is often a key part of succeeding. Second, it is special because of the way on-premise is being delivered. Specifically the new product is shipping entirely on Red Hat’s powerful container management platform, OpenShift.

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