Java EE moves to Eclipse

If you’ve been following the news about Oracle’s new direction for Java EE, you’ll know that one of the motivations for changing the governance and process is to move Java EE forward in a more agile and responsive manner.

So it’s a good sign that within a month of initially  announcing their intentions, Oracle (with help from IBM and Red Hat) have chosen the Eclipse Foundation as the future home for Java EE. You can read Oracle’s announcement here.

This is a pretty important, first, tangible step in moving Enterprise Java forward and it’s encouraging to see Oracle moving ahead at a rapid pace. Java EE is an established technology that many organizations depend on for their business critical applications. Java EE is also a large body of work with Technology Specifications, Reference Implementations and TCKs from multiple vendors and open source projects so there’s still a significant amount of work yet to happen – but this is a great start.

Oracle’s announcement to move Java EE to an Open Source foundation has already begun to energize the community, offering the opportunity to more quickly evolve the platform to meet modern workloads. The Eclipse Foundation will be significant enabler in that evolution and Red Hat fully supports Oracle’s decision. Eclipse already hosts many projects of a similar size and complexity as Java EE, and we’re confident that the many years of experience and expertise the Eclipse Foundation has with other Java technologies ensures that this will be a successful move.

MicroProfile is also an Eclipse Foundation project and Red Hat hopes this will make it easier to align Java EE and MicroProfile in the future. The MicroProfile project was started in June 2016 as a collaboration between Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, Payara and others in the Java community with the goal of making Enterprise Java more relevant to developers building cloud-native applications.

Red Hat is an Eclipse Foundation member and has worked with the Eclipse Foundation for many years on projects as diverse as JBossTools, IoT, Kapua, Vert.x and Che and we look forward to working with with Oracle, IBM, The Eclipse Foundation and others on the future of Java EE.

MicroProfile – Collaborating to bring Microservices to Enterprise Java

This post was originally published at Red Hat Developers.

MicroProfile-Black

Today at the DevNation conference in San Francisco, Red Hat’s Mark Little was joined on-stage by Alasdair Nottingham from IBM, Theresa Nguyen from Tomitribe, Mike Croft from Payara and Martijn Verburg from the London Java Community to announce a new community collaboration – MicroProfile – whose goal is to make it easier for developers to use familiar Java EE technologies and APIs for building microservice applications.

Mark talked about some of the reasons Java EE has established itself as the dominant standard for companies building business-critical multi-tier enterprise applications, including :

  • An open standard platform that enables vendors to compete on implementation, price, or business model
  • A collaborative standard and process that is driven by many vendors and individual developers rather than a single vendor
  • Consistent and holistic vision for all architectural tiers of the application
  • A strong focus on adherence to the standard and compatibility between vendor implementations and versions of the specifications

As organizations start to think about the next generation of those business-critical applications, many of them are likely thinking about cloud-native, Linux containers and microservices, and how they evolve by using the technologies and skills they already have.

Red Hat, IBM, Payara, Tomitribe and the London Java Community believe that Enterprise Java is a solid foundation on which to build the next generation of applications and the MicroProfile (which may ultimately become a submission for a standard specification) can make it easier and provide portability between vendor’s implementations. The first release of the MicroProfile is expected to be available in September, with Red Hat’s implementation to be based on WildFly Swarm.

Red Hat continues to support those in the Enterprise Java community that are working hard to move Enterprise Java forward by pushing ahead on the evolution of Java EE. To emphasize this point, Red Hat has underlined its support for Java EE 8 and is committed to finishing the JSRs it leads, like CDI 2.0, and any necessary enhancements to Bean Validation while it also invests in the MicroProfile. We see synergy between the current Enterprise Java community efforts and the newly announced MicroProfile, which is born out of the same Enterprise Java community. To us it’s clear that the Enterprise Java community is forging ahead.

Red Hat understands that Enterprise Java has been successful for almost two decades thanks to the community collaboration that drove its evolution. Please join and participate in the MicroProfile effort and let’s all take the next step forward by cooperatively innovating to bring the microservice architecture to Enterprise Java.

JBoss EAP – Spearheading OSS adoption

There are a few Open Source technologies and products that have spearheaded the drive of Open Source  into the enterprise and managed to overcome historical objections  – Linux, Apache Web Server, MySQL, Postgres, WordPress, Hadoop, to name some of the better known technologies. Those technologies paved the way for the open source revolution of the last decade; every enterprise vendor and every organization has adopted open source to some degree. Open Source has won; get over it.

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Red Hat JBoss 2015 – What a Year!

I’ve been part of the Middleware (aka JBoss) team at Red Hat for almost 8 years now and I can say pretty unequivocally that 2015 was a huge year. Huge. Huge in terms of growth (the team, revenue, customers); huge in terms of the number of new initiatives and markets we’re taking on and huge in terms of product releases. I don’t plan to enumerate all the year’s achievements here – there are way too many, but I did want to cover a few of the more recent announcements.

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