Building an API-Based Connected Healthcare Solution: Q&A Followup

Christina Lin (a technology evangelist for Red Hat) and Sameer Parulkar (middleware product marketing manager for Red Hat) conducted a webinar earlier this week about data integration challenges which specifically face healthcare providers. As promised, this is a brief roundup of the major questions that came out of the webinar and pointers to more detailed information about the demo. (If you would like more background on integration challenges in healthcare, we do have posts on integration architecture for healthcare and another on how to overcome integration challenges.)

A Quick Summary

The recording of the full webinar is available here, but I’ll summarize it briefly if you can’t watch it yet.

Continue reading “Building an API-Based Connected Healthcare Solution: Q&A Followup”

Upcoming: Architecture Designs for Camel Developers

Bilgin Ibryam, a senior architect with Red Hat, will be conducting a webinar about design patterns for new architectures like microservices, IoT, and SOA — which Apache Camel developers can use to be more effective in their coding.

Apache Camel itself is based on defined set of design patterns for messaging and integration. This makes Apache Camel a natural framework for designing microservices and IoT applications, which are inherently distributed computing systems. However, developing applications in Camel requires layers of design decisions, because effectively isolating computing components requires a clear understanding of how they will be interacting. This webinar will call out commonly used patterns and design principles for Camel application development, based on real-world examples. This covers a variety of principles, from error handling to complex, multi-route applications, scalability, and high availability.

Registration is open. The webinar is Tuesday, June 7, at 11:00am Eastern Time (US).

register_now

Fun Follow Up: Webinar Q&A

I will collect any questions asked during the webinar, and I’ll do a follow-up post on Friday, June 10, to try to capture the most interesting (or confounding) questions that arise.

Automate Now: New Video Classroom Available for Red Hat BPM Suite

Cross-posted from the Red Hat Services blog, here.

A key part of the Red Hat® product portfolio, Red Hat JBoss® Middleware makes things that should work, actually work. Everything from business processes and business rules management, helps your business run smoothly so you don’t have to sweat the small stuff. For Red Hat Training and Certification, JBoss is a crucial branch for courses and exams, equipping IT professionals with skills to accelerate, integrate, and automate.

When it comes to automation, Red Hat JBoss BRMS and Red Hat JBoss BPM suite are the way to go.

What Are JBoss BRMS and BPM Suite?

JBoss BRMS: Fast, easy development of rules and logic

JBoss BRMS is a comprehensive platform for business rules management, business resource optimization, and complex event processing (CEP). JBoss BRMS enables an organization to:

  • Deploy decision services across physical, virtual, and cloud environments.
  • Improve business agility.
  • Make consistent and efficient decisions.
  • Quickly build resource optimization solutions.
  • Shorten development cycles for faster time to market.

JBoss BPM Suite: Business processes shouldn’t be complicated

Business process management (BPM) and business rules management (BRM) systems help business and IT users collaborate to manage business logic and quickly modify procedures and policies as needed.

Training IT Professionals to Automate with JBoss

To equip organizations and IT professionals with the ability to automate, Red Hat Training’s curriculum team created:

  • Developing Workflow Applications with Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite (JB427) to incorporate workflow processing in business applications.
  • Authoring Rules with Red Hat JBoss BRMS (JB461) to to author and test rules using the graphical user interface of Business Central.
  • Developing Rules Applications with Red Hat JBoss BRMS (JB463) to create, test, debug, and control business rules in a production environment.

Red Hat Training has released these three courses in the latest way to train, Video Classroom. It’s a self-pace, on-the-go way to train, making it easier for IT professionals to get trained without the hassle of leaving the datacenter, having to pay for travel expenses, and without having to take time off work.

If you are interested in exploring more than one course within the JBoss Middleware curriculum, consider purchasing the Red Hat Learning Subscription. Easy access for individual’s to all of Red Hat Training’s online and video classroom courses in one nice training package.

Take your company, your team, or your work to the next level with these training courses today.

More Resources

Not sure where you rank with your JBoss skills? Take this skills assessment.

Want to see all our JBoss Middleware curriculum? Download this infographic.

Defining A New Value for IT

One trending phrase for CIOs is digital transformation. While the phrase itself has an easily-discerned meaning (digital technologies are changing the way that businesses operate), it is a superficial simplicity. Since every organization has a unique culture, product, and customer set, the ways and means that those organizations will digitally transform is also unique. In a real sense, digital transformation is less about technology and more about culture change.

CIO_ITAccomplishment_4

Although it steers clear of the trendy buzzwords, this kind of culture change is at the heart of the whitepaper and Society for Information Management presentation by Jason Daube and Matt Lyteson of Red Hat IT.

The practical effect of digital transformation is that IT is no longer a back-office department. IT priorities — and IT challenges — now have a strategic impact on business priorities. WHat Daube and Lyteson outline is a high-level approach to aligning IT objectives with business objectives.

Of course, the whole thing is worth reading. For this post, I just want to touch on the foundational layer that they identify: creating an IT-business partnership.

Continue reading “Defining A New Value for IT”

“Tech Preview”: Undertow

The Internet of Things is a modern term of art for a relatively old concept (in technology time). The Internet of Things (IoT) is a way of virtualizing physical objects — of making those physical objects under the control of software-based systems.

An IoT environment is predicated on a strong communication design. The various objects need a way to communicate with an end user and (depending on the object and the architecture) with a central system or with other objects. There are different potential mechanisms for that communication, but a very simple and well-vetted method is an embeddable web server.

Like the name implies, this is a web (HTTP) server that is embedded within an application, that the application can use to interact both with external clients (as a typical web service) and with the device itself.

Wilfred Nilson, writing for embedded, the systems development site, had a really great description of an embeddable web server: it is “webbing traditional design.”

Continue reading ““Tech Preview”: Undertow”

Intro to the Internet of Things

According to a 2014 Forbes article (actually, the autoplay video on the article), 87% of people had never heard the term “the Internet of things.” That has changed rapidly in the last two years (research firm 451 Research pegs 2016 as the year that the Internet of Things goes mainstream). Still, as with many cloud computing concepts, IoT is a vague term.

A Simple Description of the Internet of Things

Consumer-centric devices have emerged over the last forty years, from ATMs to inventory tracking in vending machines. Smart phones were a massive jolt, introducing a new means to connect to and interact with both consumers and physical objects. That networked, digitized environment of physical objects is the Internet of Things. 451 Research had a fantastic term for it: the Internet of things “virtualizes the physical world.”

Continue reading “Intro to the Internet of Things”

Upcoming: Practical Webinar for Data Integration for Healthcare

Christina Lin (a technology evangelist for Red Hat) and Sameer Parulkar (middleware product marketing manager for Red Hat) will be conducting a webinar about data integration challenges which specifically face healthcare providers.

Like most industries, healthcare has its own regulatory burden on managing data, and data is a critical asset. Added challenges like mandatory electronic records increases the amount of data that IT departments have to maintain and add more complexity to how systems need to interact. This webinar breaks down a key path to system integration: creating a flexible and realistic data integration layer (in this case, using Red Hat Fuse). The webinar will cover a nice example, creating a microservices-based architecture for integration which connects two different data formats (Health Level-7 and Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources) to create a fused set of APIs.

Registration is open. The webinar is May 17 at 11:00am Eastern Time (US).

register_now

Fun Follow Up: Webinar Q&A

I will collect any questions asked during the webinar, and I’ll do a follow-up post on Friday, May 20, to try to capture the most interesting (or confounding) questions that arise.

ICYMI: The Advisor Says Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite Is Mature and Covers All the Bases

The Advisor (subscription required) has some very nice words about Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite. What is apparently a pleasant surprise is the Suite part of BPM Suite.

bpm

JBoss has had its BPM project since 2003, jBPM. jBPM does business process modeling; at its core, it is a Java-based workflow engine. While it has a graphical editor (for more traditional, less technical business analysts), it also works with Eclipse, which makes it a business process tool specially adapted for Java developers to work with.

Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite, however, has expanded over the past few years to include functionality outside business process modeling, included but not limited to:

  • Rules modeling
  • Complex event process modeling
  • Business resource planning
  • Simulations and optimization

It’s not exactly bedtime reading (at 127 pages), but this reference architecture walks through the development process for a BPM application, including all of the different choices at each step and the reasoning for choosing a specific option. For a simpler look at the functionality, you can also see the JBoss BPM Suite data sheet.

 

* ICYMI: in case you missed it

The Core Value of Integration

There is a new Red Hat infographic that summarizes the benefits (and power) of integration. I am only using excerpts here because it is a large-ish infographic, and it’s definitely worth viewing the whole thing. This is just a taste. (Even better, download the underlying whitepaper; it is very much worth reading.)

value-fuse-integration

The headline-making numbers come down, not surprisingly, to cost-savings:

  • 488% ROI in three years
  • Payback in 8.2 months
  • Over $1.4 million in annual savings

The most interesting thing that I saw is definitely part of that headline, but it’s a smaller part of it — over half ($838,800) of those annual savings come from making your IT staff more productive. When an application is integrated, it requires about 41% fewer staff to maintain it. There is a lot a variation here (defining integration is a whole ‘nother blog post) but the idea of saving money, increasing individual productivity, and reducing the staff to maintain applications doesn’t necessarily translate into cutting costs or reducing staff. The power of that, the core value of integration as I read it, is reallocating those precious resources to different operations for your company. Instead of keeping your current apps running, you could have a lot more available people and space to try to do new things, to reinvest in what your company does and move forward.

That’s pretty cool.

A Commenters’ Debate on Java

There is “A Defense of Java” post over on DZone, which is an interesting enough post itself, by a guy from AppDynamics. What verges into very cool reading is the comment section (which made it DZone’s #1 commented article on Monday). There is a strong debate about the future of Java, other languages like Python and Node.js, and how major enterprises are building apps for high-traffic sites.