Intro to In-Memory Data Grids

Some of the biggest technology trends aren’t necessarily about doing something new. Things like cloud computing (as an environment) and design patterns for the Internet of Things and mobile applications (as business drivers) are building on existing conceptual foundations — virtualization, centralized databases, client-based applications. What is new is the scale of these applications and the performance expected from them.

That demand for performance and scalability has inspired an architectural design called distributed computing. Technologies within that larger umbrella used distributed physical resources to create a shared pool for that service.

One of those technologies is the purpose of this post — in-memory data grids. It takes the concept of a centralized, single database and breaks it into numerous individual nodes, working together to create a grid. Gartner defines an in-memory data grid as “a distributed, reliable, scalable and … consistent in-memory NoSQL data store[,] shareable across multiple and distributed applications.” That nails the purpose of distributed computing services: scalable, reliable, and shareable across multiple applications.

Continue reading “Intro to In-Memory Data Grids”

Intro to Integration

Integration is one of those concepts that is easy to “know,” but becomes less obvious that more you try to define it. A basic, casual definition is making different things work together. The complexity, though, comes from the fact that every single part of that has to be broken down: what are the “things,” what are they doing that makes them “work together,” how are they working, and what is the goal or purpose of them working together. All of those elements can be answered differently for different organizations, or even within the same organization at different times.

An understanding of integration comes from looking at the different potential patterns that you can integrate and then defining the logic behind the integration so you can select the right patterns for your environment.

Integration Patterns

Integration itself is an architectural structure within your infrastructure, rather than an action or specific process. While getting various systems to work together has long been an IT (and organizational) responsibility, integration as a practice became more of a focus in the early 2000s. With emerging large-scale enterprise applications, there became a growing need to get those applications working together without having to redesign or redeploy the applications themselves. That push became integration.

Integration is subdefined by what is being integrated; these are the integration patterns.

There are different types of patterns, depending on perspective. There are patterns based on what is being integrated and then there are patterns based on the topology or design of the integration. Basically, it’s the what and the how.

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Upcoming Webinar: Migrating to Open Source Integration and Automation Technologies

Balaji Rajam (principal architect) and Ushnash Shukla (senior consultant) from Red Hat will be conducting a webinar about the ability to integrate data from disparate sources with people and processes. This is a crucial part of strategies for data integration.

Data is increasingly moving from being an asset within an organization to one of the key business drivers and products, regardless of industry. The ability to integrate data from disparate sources is a crucial part of business digital strategy. Many organizations have been locked into proprietary and closed software solutions like TIBCO, but as the IT environments transform again into microservices, agile, and cloud-based infrastructures, those proprietary systems may not be able to keep up – or it may be too cost-prohibitive to try. Open source offers standards-based approaches for application interoperability with potentially lower costs and faster development times. This webinar looks at three key aspects of effectively moving from proprietary to open source solutions:

  • Recommendations for migrating from TIBCO to open source applications
  • Performing data integrations
  • Defining automated business processes and logic

Registration is open. The webinar is August 9 at 11:00am Eastern Time (US).

register_now

Fun Follow Up: Webinar Q&A

I will collect any questions asked during the webinar, and I’ll do a follow-up post on Friday, August 12, to try to capture the most interesting questions that arise.

Upcoming Webinar: Reimagine Your Java Applications

Bilge Ozpeynirci (senior product manager for Red Hat) and Thomas Qvarnstrom (JBoss technology evangelist) will be conducting a webinar about trends in application development and how these changes can influence your Java EE infrastructure, applications, and architectures.

IT is changing rapidly and in a lot of different areas: processes like DevOps, architectures like microservices, and technologies like containers. This not only affects upcoming changes in your IT infrastructure, it can affect how you maintain, migrate, or update existing applications and infrastructure.

This webinar looks at how Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 and Red Hat OpenShift 3 can be used together to effectively manage existing Java  applications and begin moving into a cloud and container based environment.

Registration is open. The webinar is July 26 at 11:00am Eastern Time (US).

register_now

Fun Follow Up: Webinar Q&A

I will collect any questions asked during the webinar, and I’ll do a follow-up post on Friday, June 29, to try to capture the most interesting questions that arise.

Upcoming: Webinar on Design Approaches for Business Automation

Justin Holmes is a business automation practice lead with Red Hat. It is essentially his job to come up with practical solutions to business problems. He is conducting a webinar next week to go over design practices to more effectively develop and deliver software products, with a heavy emphasis using business rules and process automation to make testing and deploying software more controlled and easier. This webinar will look at two historically separate development processes — engineering-driven development and business rules-driven automation — and how it is possible to develop a design model using the strengths of both.

He has more details on the Services Speaks blog.

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This event is free. It will be Tuesday, July 12, at 11am Eastern time.

And the Winner Is…

The comparison between the bag of cash representing a MINI Cooper S and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 is kind of fun. JBoss EAP 7 — like a MINI Cooper S — is small, agile, fast, and fits easily in appropriately-sized containers.

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As part of this year’s Red Hat Summit — and to celebrate the release of JBOss EAP 7 — the Red Hat Middleware group held a drawing for a (metaphorical) bagful of cash equal to the value of a 2016 MINI Cooper S ($24,950 as of June 1, 2016). Anyone at Summit (who is not a Red Hat employee or relative) could enter the drawing.

And the drawing was last night! The winner is … drumroll ….

RYAN THAMES.

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Congratulations, Ryan!

Thank you to everyone who participated and who has visited the booth so far during Summit. It has been quite a ride this week.

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Left to right, Craig Muzilla, senior vice president of Application Platforms Business; Ryan Thames (winner); and Mark Little, CTO of JBoss middleware.

For reference….

The terms and conditions for this contest are available at https://www.redhat.com/files/resources/car-giveaway-contest-terms-conditions.pdf.

Mike Piech and Rich Sharples on Facebook LIVE from Red Hat Summit

Rich Sharples, senior director of product management, and Mike Piech, vice president of marketing, got together for a half hour at the end of the Summit day today to discuss some of the major issues that have come out related to middleware this week. There have been some major announcements: the new microprofile project, the release of Red Hat JBoss EAP 7, the growth of microservices, and the recent acquisition of 3scale and what that means for API management in Red Hat Middleware.

As a quick summary, two of the major themes underscoring a lot of the announcements around JBoss, middleware, and Java this week relate to things that are micro: microservices and microprofile.

Microservices has been a subtext in many of the JBoss EAP 7 sessions and in the OpenShift sessions because this containerized, immutable, consistent environment is what makes microservices possible.Containers fundamentally enable microservices. You have an underlying runtime that is commensurate with the idea of “micro.” You can scale elastically, add instances to scale up and down. The opportunity to change things as an application travels from the desktop to the data center is much less. These are communicating systems, and that’s what container orchestration is. It coordinates these complex webs. we’re The application is the only thing that matters. Operations is there to support the application. I hit a build button and it goes through my CI/CD system, and it’s the same configuration in the environment.

However, like any application or project architecture, it’s more than “JBoss + OpenShift  = awesome microservices.” There has to be consideration and weight given to the application and the underlying technology to find a structure that fits. Microservices architecture isn’t about taking everything you’ve got and decomposing it into atomic services. It’s about having a range of sizes and services, depending on what you need. It is important to be conscious of the trade-offs that come from the increased complexity of the system. It really depends on the organization and the technology platforms they have what architecture is appropriate.

That need to understand and define the underlying framework to do microservices effectively is the theme of the second topic: the microprofile. There are defined specifications for different Java platforms (Standard and Enterprise) but both have the assumption of large-scale, full server architectures. New wave development, though, is increasingly small, with small services in those larger complex systems. What Java EE introduced to development was consistency and dependability. As we move into a new containerized world, we must do it responsibly, preserving the consistency and stability of previous environments. The microprofile project was created because a lot of vendors – Red Hat, IBM. Tomitribe, Payara – were just on a Slack chat, discussing what they needed to do for microservices and ways they could implement it. And then there was a lightbulb: maybe there’s something here. This is a chance to bring the whole Java community around a new architecture, with the strengths and discipline they’ve already developed.

Watch the whole video. For microprofile, you can join the Google group or check out the microprofile site for more information and emerging discussions.

Red Hat Summit: Tuesday Recap

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Tuesday was the first official day of Red Hat Summit. (DevNation started on Monday.) There is a lot going on in middleware, down a lot of different tracks — application development, business automation, integration. Tuesday had an overall focus on containers; for middleware, that means that most of the sessions related to Red Hat Enterprise Application Platform 7 and how it works in cloud and container environments.

Don’t forget to check the Middelware Guide to Loving Summit for session highlights for each day and for social media channels to watch for live tweeting and general commentary.

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit: Tuesday Recap”

JBoss EAP 7 Fast and Sporty: The Cash / Car Giveaway

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 is small, agile, fast, and fits easily in appropriately-sized containers. There are a number of ways we’re showing our pride for the JBoss EAP 7 launch here at Summit, but one of the coolest is the cash / car giveaway, with a Mini Cooper S convertible, tucked inside a custom container.

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Starting today, Red Hat Summit attendees can enter a drawing to win an amount of cash equivalent to the price of the Mini Cooper S convertible ($24,950 as of June 1, 2016). Tablets to sign up are located at various JBoss booths in the Partner Pavilion of Moscone West. The drawing will be held Wednesday evening, so don’t delay.

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There are the normal restrictions: no Red Hat employees or friends and relatives of employees, and you do have to be a Red Hat Summit attendee to be eligible. The full contest terms and conditions are on the Red Hat website: 

https://www.redhat.com/files/resources/car-giveaway-contest-terms-conditions.pdf.

Good luck.

Red Hat Summit: Monday Recap

Yesterday was an incredibly exciting day at the DevNation general session. Two major things occurred (out of half a dozen things) related to middleware at Red Hat:

I summarized those two announcements with some thoughts on how they show the evolution and resilience of Java on LinkedIn. Read the whole thing, as they say.

Other highlights from Monday’s DevNation:

There’s a new photo album on the Middleware Facebook page, too, capturing a lot of moments from this week.