Summit Prep: Process Driven Apps

The “process driven” part of process driven applications is fascinating because of how many different things it touches — complex event processing, low code development, DevOps processes. BPM is an engine for completely different and unique application workflows; and it also unites business analysts and developers in a unique way by visualizing or applying business logic within application designs.

There is a separate business automation track at Red Hat Summit, and a scan of the different session titles hints at the diversity of concept and application that falls under “automation.” These are just some of my favorites; check the catalog for the full list.

Transforming a process driven enterprise into a digitally engaged enterprise

Tuesday, 11:30, 157B

This looks at automation as a step beyond being responsive to events and as a point where customers can directly engage with an application (and organization).

A design approach to bridge DevOps and business automation

Tuesday, May 2, 3:30

DevOps is usually aligned with containers because of the need to rapidly and repeatedly spin up identical instances and environments for development, testing, and production. But if BPM is the intersection of business analytics and development, then there needs to be a way for the process and rules design to be as iterative and nimble as a DevOps environment.

End to end BPM

Wednesday, 3:30, 153C

This looks at an integration between Signavio’s modeling tools and JBoss BPM Suite as a business process engine.

Thyssenkrupp: Workforce optimization with business resource planner and OpenShift

Wednesday, 10:15, 153C

One of the core roles of BPM is workforce management, effectively and responsibly allocating people across an enterprise. This is an interesting session because it looks at the real life, practical application of BPM within a large enterprise and how they successfully created a dynamic system tat continuously incorporates changing data and patterns. Who doesn’t love a story with a good ending?

Using real-time data to enable real-time analytics

Tuesday, 10:15, 156C

This looks at in-memory computing and architectures that keep data “at the edge” of the environment for more responsiveness.

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